Texas Tech University

Frequently Asked Questions

 

I am a PreLaw Major. What classes should I take?

PreLaw is NOT a major, rather a designated title indicating your intention to attend Law School. Texas Tech University offers a Legal Studies Minor that is optional and may serve to prepare students with the skills that will be necessary in Law School.

What Majors do Law Schools recommend?

Law Schools do not have a preference of major for students interested in a legal education. Rather, admissions encourage diversity in their applicants and degrees that are challenging and in fields of interest to the individual. It is encouraged that students take courses that they can maintain a high GPA while learning to speak clearly and think critically.

How do I get involved in the PreLaw Program?

You can join the PreLaw Program at any time. For the most benefit, it is best to start as soon as possible. The website is a great tool to inform students of up-coming events and opportunities with the program. See the event calendar for more information and register for an event today!

What does it mean to study law?

The discipline of law is for students who are interested in combining precision in thinking, researching, and writing with a desire to work with people. Students may choose to use their law degrees in the courtroom or in a non-law practicing career. The skills developed through their education in law will assist them to be successful in their profession of choice.

Students will need a four year bachelor's degree in the academic discipline of their choice prior to applying to law school.

Who do I contact with Questions about Law School Applications?

The PreLaw Advising team consists of Assistants and Ambassadors that are willing to answer any of your Law School related questions. Attending an event is a great way to speak personally to a team member; however, emailing the program at prelaw@ttu.edu is a great way to receive feedback as well.

What are the main things Law School Admissions look for in an Application?

The main components of your law school application are:
GPA, LSAT score, Resume, Letters of Recommendation, and your Personal Statement. Many schools use your LSAT score and GPA to determine if your application meets their minimum admission requirements. If your scores are satisfactory, then law schools will examine the remaining components holistically to determine if you are a good fit for their law program.

What is the LSAT?

The LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) is a standardized test required for admission to all ABA-approved law schools. It is a test of general skills in reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, and logic. The scores range from 120 to 180 and the test is arranged according to the following format:

The test consists of 5 timed 35-minute multiple choice sections:

  1. 2 Logical Reasoning
  2. 1 Reading Comprehension
  3. 1 Logic Games
  4. 1 Experimental section that is NOT scored
  5. Writing Section (read but not scored)

The LSAT is administered through LSAC and is given 4 times a year. For more information see: www.lsac.org

What is LSAC?

The LSAC (Law School Admissions Council) is a non-profit corporation whose members consist of more than 200 law schools across the United States and Canada. LSAC is best known for administering the LSAT exam.

Why do I need a LSAC Account?

Students use the LSAC website throughout their application process. An account with LSAC is required before attaining an account with the Credential Assembly Service. The LSAC website is where students will sign up to take the LSAT exam. Further, the Candidate Referral Service (CRS) uses the LSAC website to allow law schools to contact individuals that may benefit from their program.

What is the Credential Assembly Service?

Students use the LSAC website throughout their application process. An account with LSAC is required before attaining an account with the Credential Assembly Service. The LSAC website is where students will sign up to take the LSAT exam. Further, the Candidate Referral Service (CRS) uses the LSAC website to allow law schools to contact individuals that may benefit from their program.

What Services does the Credential Assembly Service Provide?

The CAS (Credential Assembly Service) is required for all students applying to an ABA-approved law school. The CAS will create a law school report and send that out to the law schools of your choice. Your LSAT scores, transcripts, personal statement, letters of recommendation, and resume will be sent out to law schools by the CAS.

To create an account, students must register with www.lsac.org first and then use the link on the home page to guide them through the process.

How do I become a PreLaw Ambassador?

During the Spring Semester each year, the PreLaw Program sends out applications for leadership positions. After the submission deadline, the chosen applicants are called in for interviews and then notified whether or not they have been chosen as part of the Ambassador Team.