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CASNR IS

  • A leading college in the U.S. with programs awarding 11 baccalaureate, 10 masters and 6 doctorate degrees in agricultural sciences and natural resources disciplines.
  • Currently ranked in the upper third in size among universities with agricultural sciences and natural resources programs.

CASNR HAS

  • State-of-the-art research and teaching facilities
  • Biotechnology – ready greenhouse
  • Collaborative design studio for landscape architecture
  • An Equestrian Center with four outdoor arenas and one indoor arena
  • One on-campus and two off-campus research farms
  • A 2,300-acre ranch
  • Turf management and maintenance program at the Rawls Course (Texas Tech’s European designed, 18-hole championship golf course)

OP-ED ON FILE

  • The Critical Role of Scholarship Funding: Scholarship support to attract top academic scholars is essential to accomplishing our goals of quality growth. By Jane Piercy
  • A Vital Resource For the Future: Baccalaureate degrees in Texas Tech University’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources are key to providing the science-based expertise necessary to ensure economic viability. By Michael Galyean
  • The Greatest Challenge Facing Agriculture: ‘If there is no guarantee the farmers can keep their land, then no farmer will be concerned with any long-term benefits from the land.’ By Kevin Redwine
  • Career Opportunities in Agriculture: ‘We need professionals that can stand up for the agriculture industry to protect the quality of life for our growing society.’ By Lori Dudley
  • Boosting Student Retention: CASNR’s Student-Centered Programs, Faculty-Based Advising Key Student Success By Rachel Bobbitt
  • Dollars and Sense: The Long-Term Economic Value of Higher Education and Research By Eduardo Segarra and Sukant Misra
  • A Historical Perspective: America’s Founding Fathers Established the Importance of Agricultural Education by Steve Fraze
  • The Ties That Bind: Forging New Links from the Farm to Natural Resource Management by Philip Gipson
  • Agricultural Research: Carrying the Water for U.S. Competitiveness by Darren Hudson
  • A Global Priority: Education and Research in Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources by Sukant Misra

ABOUT THE COLLEGE

  • 1,577 Undergraduates
  • 350 Graduate Students
  • 76 Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty
  • $46.1 Million Total Endowment
  • 16 Endowed Professorships & Chairs
  • $1.9 Million Scholarship Awards
  • $10.2 Million Research Funding

UPDATE

Strategic Vision
CASNR continues to work toward becoming a national leader in teaching/learning, research, and engagement programs. It is currently operating under the Strategic Plan for the 2006-2010 time-period; with periodic revision of goals, objective, and strategies as deemed necessary by the CASNR Strategic Planning and Visioning Committee.

Longer-term goals for CASNR include 2,150 total student enrollment, $20 Million research grants per year and $80 Million in endowment by 2020.

Jane Piercy

The Critical Role
Of Scholarship Funding:
Scholarship support to attract top academic scholars is essential to accomplishing our goals of quality growth.

By Jane Piercy

Texas Tech has always been an institution where students can obtain a valuable education without the burden of a heavy price tag; however, decreased state funding continues to hinder the university’s ability to provide assistance to outstanding students with financial need. Moreover, the increasing cost of higher education is placing an unprecedented burden on college-bound students.   more >>

Michael Galyean

A Vital Resource
For the Future:
Baccalaureate degrees in Texas Tech University’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources are key to providing the science-based expertise necessary to ensure economic viability.

By Michael Galyean

In the years to come, CASNR graduates will contribute significantly to meeting world food production demands and sustainably managing global natural resources. The long-term economic and environmental health of Texas depends on continuing support for these important degree programs.   more >>

Kevin Redwine

The Greatest Challenge
Facing Agriculture:
‘If there is no guarantee the farmers can keep their land, then no farmer will be concerned with any long-term benefits from the land.’

By Kevin Redwine

We must remember that the agricultural industry comes with a biological lag that other industries do not have to worry about. It allows for creative ways to become more inefficient within the agricultural sector. By overcoming the hindrances from the government, growing population, and lack of property rights the agricultural sector could become a more productive industry.   more >>

Lori Dudley

Career Opportunities in Agriculture:
‘We need professionals that can stand up for the agriculture industry to protect the quality of life for our growing society.’

By Lori Dudley

It’s a tough row to hoe for kids in college today; especially those aiming at getting a degree that focuses on agriculture and natural resources degrees. You’ve probably heard that major agricultural universities like ours here on the High Plains have helped to create a society where less than 2 percent of our citizens produce the food required to keep the remaining 98 percent at the dinner table.   more >>

Rachel Bobbitt

Boosting Student Retention:
CASNR’s Student-Centered Programs, Faculty-Based Advising Key Student Success

By Rachel Bobbitt

It’s a tough row to hoe for kids in college today; especially those aiming at getting a degree that focuses on agriculture and natural resources degrees. You’ve probably heard that major agricultural universities like ours here on the High Plains have helped to create a society where less than 2 percent of our citizens produce the food required to keep the remaining 98 percent at the dinner table.   more >>

Eduardo Segarra

Dollars and Sense:
The Long-Term Economic Value of Higher Education and Research

By Eduardo Segarra and Sukant Misra

Given the magnitude of the current economic downturn nationally, there’s been considerable debate regarding how to address state revenue shortfalls. Several states have been dealing with these issues for years, but for Texas, it’s a new phenomenon. Current revenue projections for Texas highlight the necessity to scrutinize any and all state expenditures … higher education included. Let’s look at one example, a case study if you will, of higher education’s economic value using Texas Tech’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. Overall it’s a small slice of the budget pie, but one that packs some surprising economic punch.   more >>

Steve Fraze

A Historical Perspective:
America’s Founding Fathers Established the Importance of Agricultural Education

By Steve Fraze

To address the current and future importance of agricultural education, we need to reflect on our history. George Washington declared the importance of agricultural education in his 1796 State of the Union Address when he said, ““It will not be doubted that with reference either to individual or national welfare, agriculture is of primary importance.” Thomas Jefferson’s unwavering image of the United States’ future prosperity was based on a nation rich in agricultural wealth. Such wealth, he imagined would yield worldwide respect and power for the young nation.   more >>

Philip Gipson

The Ties That Bind:
Forging New Links from the Farm to Natural Resource Management

By Philip Gipson

In today’s difficult economic times, we need to remember the importance of agriculture and natural resources to our economy and culture. First, let’s put a number on it. There are some 250,000 farms and ranches in Texas. Private lands devoted to farming, ranching and forestry include more than 142 million acres. That adds up to 88 percent of the land in Texas. Moreover, we lead the nation in cattle, sheep and goat production; not to mention our national dominance in cotton and grain crops, along with huge quantities of watermelons, grapefruits and cantaloupes.   more >>

Darren Hudson

Agricultural Research:
Carrying the Water for U.S. Competitiveness

By Darren Hudson

Less than 2 percent of the American population lives or works on a farm. But, supplying input to those farms, processing the product, transportation, and retailing of food and fiber products collectively accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. employment and economic output. On the Texas High Plains, that percentage is much higher – about 40 percent. And, around the globe, agriculture forms the foundation for the economies of many nations.   more >>

Sukant Misra

A Global Priority:
Education and Research in Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources

By Sukant Misra

Here’s some food for thought: In the next four decades experts are predicting that the world’s population is likely to grow by 50 percent from 6 billion to 9 billion. That huge growth, along with a rising standard of living across the globe, leads inevitably to a forecast that we’ll have to double food production. But that increase is going to have to take place on the same or less land using the same or less water and energy.   more >>