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Tech, CASNR Celebrate 90th Year; Senate Bill Signed This Month in 1923

Tech, CASNR Celebrate 90th Year; Senate Bill Signed This Month in 1923

Texas Tech’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources celebrates a milestone this month, the 90th anniversary of the passage of Texas Senate Bill No. 103, Texas Technological College’s charter. The bill – passed Feb. 10, 1923 – was signed by the governor to establish a Texas state college in West Texas.

With the site of Texas Technological College chosen, the cornerstone for the Administration Building was laid Nov. 11, 1924. Five schools began classes in the fall of 1925, including agriculture, arts and sciences, engineering, home economics and music. In the 1960s and 1970s, the institution officially changed its name to Texas Tech University.

“What started as a vision to provide educational opportunities in West Texas has grown into a world-class institution of higher learning,” added Interim Texas Tech President Lawrence Schovanec.

Today, CASNR is a leading academic college offering 11 baccalaureate, 10 masters and six doctorate degrees in agricultural sciences and natural resources disciplines. University officials note that it ranks in the upper third in size among universities with agricultural sciences and natural resources programs.

“Since Texas Tech’s beginning, we’ve provided programs of excellence in teaching, research and public service to prepare students for employment in the modern agricultural and renewable natural resources industry,” said CASNR Dean Mike Galyean. Currently, CASNR has 1,522 undergraduates and 334 graduate students, along with 76 tenured, tenure-track faculty members. It has a total endowment of $40.8 million, annual scholarship awards of $2.1 million, and total research funding: $10.3 million.

Lubbock was chosen as the future site of Texas Technological College in August 1923 with the help of Texas State Senator William Bledsoe, who authored Senate Bill 103 and called Lubbock home. The Lubbock community played a key role by coming out to celebrate and greet the locating committee during its visit.

Reporting by Callie Jones

CONTACT: Michael Galyean, Dean, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Texas Tech University at (806) 742-2808 or michael.galyean@ttu.edu

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