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AFS grad Clayton Dehn tapped for executive post at clinical research firm

AFS grad Clayton Dehn tapped for executive post at clinical research firm

Clayton Dehn, a graduate from Texas Tech’s Department of Animal and Food Sciences, has been appointed executive director of metabolic diseases at Lincoln, Neb.-based Celerion, one of the nation’s leaders in early clinical research and applied translational medicine.

Dehn will lead the expansion of Celerion’s current capabilities that supporting early proof-of-concept in the development of diabetes, obesity, metabolic and cardio-metabolic interventions. He received his bachelor’s degree in in animal science (2002) and master’s degree in physiology (2003) from Texas Tech.

“Were pleased to have Clayton join the Global Clinical Research team,” said Phil Bach, Celerion’s vice president of global clinical research. “His comprehensive knowledge of specialized metabolic testing methods and hands-on operational experience will be a great asset to our organization and clients’ drug development programs.”

Dehn comes to Celerion with 15 years of experience in drug development. Previously he led successful metabolic programs at two contract research organizations, and served as director of clinical research and development at a start-up biotech company developing investigational devices, techniques and compounds for use in assisted reproduction.

Celerion officials claim that Dehn reinforces Celerion’s commitment to accelerating drug development through applied transitional medicine. Clients working in the metabolic area will have access to an arsenal of complex, highly sensitive pharmacodynamic tests capable of detecting early signals of efficacy.

One of the goals of Celerion is to help drug developers capture and understand early signals of activity and confirmation of drug mechanism in humans through use of biomarker technologies. By applying technology and study designs, the potential risk of positive or equivocal signs of drug toxicity from preclinical studies can often be addressed in early clinical studies.

Written by Norman Martin

CONTACT: Michael Orth, Chair and Professor, Department of Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech University at (806) 742-2805 ext. 223 or michael.orth@ttu.edu

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