College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
TTU Home CASNR Home NewsCenter Home

CASNR News Center

Red leaves are blooming, it’s poinsettia sale time again

image image ‘Tis poinsettia season for Texas Tech University’s Department of Plant and Soil Science. In the coming weeks members of the department will be selling the holiday “Christmas plant” at the university’s greenhouse located on the corner of Main and Hartford, just north of the United Spirit Arena.

This year plant colors available include red, pink, white and marble. The cost for the plants, which are about 18-inches tall, is $14 each.

Officials note that proceeds of the sales event will benefit the Texas Tech Horticulture Society.

Floral Gifts. According to the Society of American Florists, more people buy floral gifts for others and themselves at Christmas than any other time of the year. More than 80 percent of flowering plants purchased now are poinsettias, primarily the traditional red variety.

Officials said holiday flowers will be available for pick up Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. during the last week of November or delivery of three of or more plants is available by prior arrangement.

Walk-ins are welcome, officials said. In addition, email orders can be made at ttupoinsettia@yahoo.com and an order confirmation will be returned. Payment with cash, check or departmental funds transfers can be sent to the Horticulture Society MS42122.

Poinsettia’s Namesake. The Aztecs in Mexico first cultivated the flowering native evergreen shrub as a symbol of purity and for its reddish purple dye and medicinal latex. But it wasn’t until the 17th century that poinsettias started to be associated with Christmas.

In 1825, Joel Robert Poinsett – botanist, first American ambassador to Mexico and the poinsettia’s namesake – introduced the shrub to the United States. It took another century before they started to be sold as potted plants in the U.S. and Canada during the holiday season. Today, poinsettias come in more than 100 varieties, with many shapes and sizes.

– Written by Brittni Drennan

 

Find something wrong on this page? Help us fix it! Report an error.