Texas Tech University

SOCIAL and TECTONIC TRANSPARENCY: LUBBOCK DOWNTOWN ATHLETIC CLUB

Arch 3601 · Online

Instructors: Hendrika Buelinckx

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ARCH 3601_Architecture Design Studio V focuses on developing the knowledge and ability of students to design a project in response to programmatic and contextual constraints while maintaining a cohesive design concept and strategy derived from an architectural precedent. The study and analysis of an iconic public building of the most recent past will provide the framework against which to evaluate potential design solutions based on foundational disciplinary ideas, theoretical lines of thought, and mainstream typologies. The discipline of architecture constantly challenges its own history through a process of self-examination and forward-looking observation and projection; working backwards and forwards in time simultaneously, mining and reinventing itself at every step of the design process.

As a skill-based design studio course, this semester's projects will build upon the students' previously acquired skills in architectural representation, spatial composition, and tectonic articulation; yet, they will challenge students' ability to resolve a program of greater complexity and establish relationships between the building and its urban environment. The athletic club provides an opportunity for students to explore the relationships between the body, its movements during athletic exercises, and the spaces that accommodate these practices. The preset sizes of the programmed activities in the athletic center will require the students to resolve the spatial ordering of unlike volumes in both plan and section. The various volumetric space requirements and patterns of use inherent to these activities will engage the students to design beyond purely functional solutions and consider architectural propositions from both the inside-out, and from the outside-in.

The Making of Design Principles: line, plane, volume

Arch 3601 · Hybrid

Instructors: Bryan Buie

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The studio will have two projects both lasting six and half weeks. The first project will be the design of a black box theater, the second project will be an observatory. Each project will be based on a series of design exercises that are fundamental and generalizable to all building types, as well as developable, each one, to a high level of artistic sophistication. Each student will be given a 2'x 2' x 2' wire mesh cube, which will be referred to as “the matrix.” All modeling exercises will be conducted in the matrix using string and chipboard.

The most important lesson of this studio is learning how to make decisions. Decisions are laser-guided choices that are similar to algorithmic steps, but there is more to architecture, art, and life than that. In the Making of Design Principles students will learn how to setup a design problem, how to experience moments of discovery, how to see moments of pattern/logic recognition that are so fundamental to building an idea or argument. To see and understand these moments will be the source of inspiration, the connective logic that makes meaning, it is architecture's source as an art.

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Architecture Design V

Arch 3601 · Hybrid

Instructors: David A Driskill, AIA

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Engagement Project

Lubbock ISD has under construction a new school which combines three existing North Lubbock Elementary Schools: Write/Jackson/Guadalupe. The Guadalupe Sommerville Center, an afterschool and summer program, currently located within walking distance of Guadalupe Elementary needs to relocate within walking distance of the new Northside Elementary to serve the larger population. The City of Lubbock has made land available adjacent to the new school for the proposed Northside Community Center. The land is designated as a city park.

Context

The site in north Lubbock is the center of Latino culture. The original townsite for Anglo Lubbock is now the Lubbock Lake Landmark. Monterey, a Latino community, segregated by law, was located 2 miles down the canyon. The two communities joined as Lubbock when the Lubbock Lake site relocated adjacent to the new railroad, across the tracks from Monterey, now known as the Guadalupe Neighborhood. The northside communities are wedged between a railway and the Canyon Lakes.

Class Modality

The studio will follow a professional methodology: context analysis, precedent studies, establishing project goals/aspirations, concept development, schematic design, design development and presentation excellence.

Playground Studio

Arch 3601 · Hybrid

Instructors: Elisandra Garcia

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Playground Studio will focus on the relationship between play, architecture and landscape. Playground Studio will first investigate the definition of “happiness” in space and understand causes of anxiety and depression. The studio will then explore play, wonder and nature, as a possible spatial solution to host urban gardens and a children rescue center. This rescue center will focus on educational, therapeutic and recreational activities for children at risk of suspension or expulsion, in need of behavioral therapy due to distress or psychological trauma. While the focus will be primarily on architecture for children; the program will be designed to integrate families, people of all color, religion, income and education levels. We will unfold the demographic layers of our context to understand the need for public and community driven buildings.

Through the visualization of data, our playground studio will learn to understand the effects of enclosure, light and shadow in human psychology. Nature will serve as primary inspiration for conceptual and material development. With a heavy focus on graphic expression, our architectural projects will be speculative, but rigorous in their structural, material and conceptual definition. The focus is to allow children a natural space of wonder, adventure and education; while still inviting the inner child in each of us to learn something new about this ever changing world.

The expected deliverables include but are not limited to, rigorous research and data visualization, analog and digital art, architectural and experimental drawings, and a small short film at the end of the semester.

ARCHITECTURE THAT FIGHTS PANDEMICS: Designing a student living neighborhood and the new normal of student campus life

Arch 3601 · Online

Instructor: Lisa Lim

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The history of this pandemic is still being written. The death toll continues to climb, and the world is trying to find a vaccine. While we all are waiting for the moment it ends, it is continuously changing the way we live. Most places were closed, we were working and learning at home, and we were meeting virtually. Businesses and schools are reopening, but everything looks much different. We continue to keep our social distance from each other, wear face coverings or even a personal protective equipment to live our daily lives. It has changed the way we walk, watch movie, enjoy the park, dine, and exercise, and so on. Some believe it will never be the same as they were before; and what we should be doing now is to make the new normal a good one. This is the moment to really think how architecture can help and lead the change.

Architecture and built environments play significant roles in infection control. Purposefully designed spaces can support prevention and treatment of infectious disease. It can not only help controlling the transmission of infectious agents but also regulate the way users behave. Architecture can decrease the opportunity to contact contagion by providing ample and clean airflow, by building effective system, or by designing spaces that are conducive to infection control. Designed spaces can also regulate the way people interact with each other. It can ensure social distancing between the users, and it can define the way people talk to each other, dine together, learn together, and so on. In order to support the transition into post-pandemic, groups of experts including designers, engineers, and public health experts are providing design guidelines for safer restaurants, outdoor dining spaces, streets, schools, and offices, indicating the critical role of architecture in fighting pandemics.

This studio is about developing provocative design statements for student living neighborhood in response to the pandemic. Students will imagine and suggest new possibilities of future student lifestyle on campus, the new and safe way of learning, eating, exercising, etc. through design. Students will design the student living neighborhood located in Texas Tech University Lubbock campus, in relation to the private and public student living spaces, and the broader context including the campus and the city. The course is a critical lesson in developing students' design thinking skills, analyzing precedents, and learning the role of architects in response to communal values.

Deliverables

  • Precedent analysis and research booklet
  • Concept statement and diagrams/images illustrating the defined scenarios
  • Study model and progress images/sketches/diagrams
  • Drawings: site plan, floor plans, sections, and perspectives
  • Atmospheric perspectives
  • Final presentation booklet

Class Modality

Studios are scheduled to meet virtually, during regularly scheduled hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 1:00pm - 4:50 pm. We will use multiple platforms, including Blackboard, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, and One Drive.

CENTER FOR UNLEARNING: DESIGNING CULTURALLY ACCESSIBLE STRUCTURES FOR ANTIRACIAL COMMUNITIES

Arch 3601 · Hybrid

Instructor: Victoria McReynolds

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McReynolds's hybrid modality studio explores the socio-spatial variations of multiracial environments by asking the question, “What are the stories not being told and what narratives are missed within the civic spaces of our communities?”. We will approach this question through three phases: (1) remixing the human figure as a cultural figure, (2) mapping hidden histories, and (3) configuring structures for ‘unlearning'.

This studio aims to cultivate empathy as an essential component of design through drawing, narrative, mapping, and exchange. Students will learn how to identify cultural and physical inaccessibility found in public spaces and, through their proposed structures, dislodge these normative modes of operation.

Our method for ‘unlearning' will overturn assumptions on authorship authority through an open framework of collaboration, dialogue, and exchange. We will engage other architecture students from multiple universities, such as Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in California and McGill University in Montreal, as well as Texas Tech. Discussions will align with themes on unlearning, narrative, and knowledge so we may become more aware of our own implicit biases and improve our design consequences.

Beyond Plants

Arch 3601 · Online

Instructors: Brendan Shea

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Currently there are interlinked crises in climate, health, and class. In each of these inequities, buildings play a major role. Rather than imagine a post-pandemic city, this studio, Beyond Plants, seeks to uncover causes in the built environment here and now. The studio will explore the design and distribution of plants, examining them through the architecture and geography of industrial chicken-growing complexes and sprawling processing facilities across the Broiler Belt of Texas and the American South. The critical reappraisal of the plant as type will be twofold; first, providing pressure to think speculatively, moving far beyond convention with the formal, spatial, and socio-economic possibilities of new, experimental configurations of factory production, and, second, as a pretext for dismantling systems, introducing animated drawings, genetic algorithms, evolutionary solvers as tools to challenge, renegotiate, or otherwise expand the perspective on canonical approaches to producing architectural objects in response to pressing social problems.

This studio is part of the ongoing project Wild Interfaces, which explores urban-rural relations, the built environment of resource management in the anthropocene, and the notion of coexistence across the human/nature divide. The task last semester was to reconsider the National Parks and reemploy "wilderness" as a distributed system of cultural spaces in fringe conditions of cities. This semester will challenge students to reimagine the architectural mechanics and affects of plants while wrangling with industrial landscapes and the twinned environmental dilemmas of the intensification of globalized trade networks and the localized effects of the livestock revolution.

The studio will undertake the development of a single speculative design project over the course of the semester in four parts. In Concentration One, Plant-opedia, students will conduct research to rigorously analyze and collectively illustrate the numerous architectural forms and industrial functions of the plant. A series of black-and-white dimensioned drawings, formatted according to the standards of a template, will be required. In Concentration Two, Plant Crazy, students will study an existing service building or plant precedent from a critical practitioner of architecture in order to retrace the project's disciplinary position and reup the architect's formal, organizational, and environmental principles. Plan perspective drawings of both the existing plant and the reupped approach will be foregrounded as well as an animation of the transformation. For Concentration Three, Small Plants, Large Plants, students will consider size and propose architectural strategies to rethink the plant at two distinct scales; the corner and the building. At this point, the studio will generate chthonic axonometric drawings for the corner condition and set them into tension with an unfolded elevation drawing of the entire plant building. Lastly, in Concentration Four, The Dis-, Trans-, Co-Gen Plant for 2045, the modified plant will be revisited in relation to disciplinary problems with program, representation, and time. Projecting forward 25 years, students will illustrate scenarios in an alternate future through single-point and multi-point perspectives rich with color, texture, and context.

Deliverables

  • C1 - Diagrams, Dimensioned Drawings
  • C2 - Plan Perspective, Animation
  • C3 - Chthonic Axonometric, Unfolded Axonometric
  • C4 - Perspectives

Image - Jones Partners & Associates, UCLA Chiller Plant / Cogeneration Facility, 1994

Spatial Crimes: Architectures of Control

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Galo Canizares + Stephanie Sang Delgado

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The prison is one of the most complex architectural mechanisms in human history. It is perhaps the ultimate architecture of control. From Daedalus's mythical prison-labyrinth to Bentham's Panopticon the construction of prisons exists as both a fictional-imaginary trope as well as a very real social justice issue. Together with the protean conception of “crime,” the carceral system has evolved into a mechanism for urban-scale control that affects the built environment, perceptions of race, economic development, and our own concepts of justice.

This seminar will focus on architecture's role in spatial crimes, crimes that are committed by architects, or are created by spatial conditions. We will study fiction and non-fiction representations of prisons and other crimes such as burglary, slavery, and redlining. In this class, students will analyze architecture of control from castles to plantations to urban design and reflect on architecture's role in the development and perception of the contemporary carceral system.

Women & Architecture Here & There

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Hendrika Buelinckx

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This course explores issues relating to women and architecture at both the local and global level. It traces female contributions to architecture in the past, assesses their status in the present, and strategizes on how to envision their role in the future. Topics for the readings, lectures, and discussions will be culled from a wide variety of sources—briefly reviewing the vernacular tradition, critically examining their contributions to modern architecture of the twentieth century, assessing their present status, and distilling conclusions for future action. This local and global—here & there—review of issues pertaining to women in architecture aims to provide students with a basic framework to assess contemporary and future architectural practices.

Visualizing Violence through Data

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Elisandra Garcia

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Visualizing Violence through Data will be a course focused on the research, investigation and graphic representation of violence in the modern era. While we will be learning from case studies around the world, we will primarily focus on American Violence and its effect on space, society and politics.

Each student will investigate a violent historic event after the early 20th century, that possibly keeps affecting American society today. We are going to dissect the historic event through architectural drawings, diagrams and creative informative artwork.

Through the collection and curation of all of the work produced, each student will be given a booklet template to edit and finalize with their selected topic. This is also part of our class Collection of Books. Booklets will be published upon qualification.

Design Thinking

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Robert D. Perl

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Design Thinking addresses methods of design, ways of thinking, and means of design thinking through multiple experiences of reading, discussing, and writing. It positions design thinking within the discipline of architecture, explores the role of design within the profession of architecture, and considers the place of creativity in design processes. The course will make students more conscious of their current design, thinking, and communications skills and assist them in developing new abilities in these areas.

UNLEARNING FROM LAS VEGAS

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Brendan Shea

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This course introduces canonical texts and drawings then reconsiders them in light of alternative discursive positions and emerging formats of representation which might rework, resist or otherwise recondition the disciplinary conventions for the study of challenging topics in the history and theory of architecture. In this context, Las Vegas—a formally, spatially, and socially charged site with valences in and beyond the American West—will serve as the central case study to dismantle.

Digital Media II (El Paso)

Arch 3341 · Online

Instructor: Andres Gandara + Stephen Mueller

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The course will introduce students to paradigmatic and emerging models of contemporary digital production, accelerating capacities for design exploration, execution, and communication. The digital technologies architects use to generate, measure, assess, refine, and represent designs have the ability to shape new possibilities for our built environment and our lived experience. A foundational fluency and critical engagement with emerging design technologies—including computational, generative, and analytical tools—can provide real-time feedback between input and output, desire and effect.

This course will introduce students to a range of digital design software environments and techniques, with an emphasis on developing and representing highly crafted digital and physical models, alongside 2D and 3D digital drawings, with each artifact exhibiting a high degree of digital craft and complexity. Craft, in architectural representation, is tied intimately to the craft of construction itself. As architects craft representations—drawings and models of space—they imagine, test, speculate on, and anticipate possible constructed worlds. Architects must constantly navigate the gap between the immaterial virtual environment and the material constructed environment it implicates. A digitally crafted representation will exhibit both the mastery of digital skill and input from the material world it engages. Complexity in this course is understood as describing architectural and representational systems in which many parts are inter-related and codependent – each element affects and contributes to the whole.

Architecture Technology III: Gravity: Assemblies

Arch 3350 · Online

Instructor: Peter Raab

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Study of structures with emphasis on capacities/actions/statics and equilibrium. Analysis of structural behavior: material/assemblies/joints. Introduction to structures codes.

Building Information Technology

Arch 3352 · Online

Instructor: Darrick Wade

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Construction drawings, often referred to as working drawings, are a communication medium whose purpose is to graphically convey the design requirements for a construction project. They respond to the intent of the design by indicating in considerable detail how the building components of the project are assembled and joined. The drawings work together with the specifications to illustrate and describe the intended results. While the drawings communicate how the building's elements and components come together to realize the design intent, the specifications define the exact nature of each building component, and how it must perform.

Architectural Technology IV: Atmosphere (El Paso)

Arch 3355 · Online

Instructor: Guillermo Barajas

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Study of environmental systems and envelopes with emphasis on their relationships. Analysis of air-conditioning, ventilation, acoustics, daylighting, facades, cladding. Introduction to MEP, codes, regulations.

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS & SITE PLANNING: Situating Architecture in a Changing Field

Arch 3373 · Online

Instructor: Victoria McReynolds

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This lecture course explores site and the greater environment as an ongoing system of relationships with architecture. Introduced themes and examples challenge the traditional notion of a site as a place from which building sits. Rather these course topics introduce site as a dynamic field defined by an ecology of changing factors. Architecture therefore is a construction of ideas situated within a changing context. With a focus towards the most vulnerable sites and environments, we will analyze terms and definitions, consider concepts and conditions, explore methods and case studies, and become familiar with industry standards and tools for designing site.

Environmental and sustainable strategies are no longer an exception to the design culture. Rather solutions to the increasingly complex site changes are approached with an integrative solution that takes into account immediate change and the long term vision. Our observations, understandings and implementations of sustainable environmental approaches is now considered an essential component of design. We live in an increasingly unpredictable world of constantly changing, unstable environmental effects. Therefore our design solutions need to equally take into consideration a flexible and innovative strategy that accommodates for the for coming extremes.

Environmental considerations range from the single residential project site to larger infrastructure strategies. This course teaches tactile practical lessons to understand the consequences of solar, water, temperature challenges at all project scales. And approaches the understanding of environmental systems through the critical urgent challenges facing contemporary design and construction.

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS & SITE PLANNING (El Paso)

Arch 3373 · Online

Instructor: Ersela Kripa

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Basic course to develop a working knowledge of the techniques and principles involved in site planning to provide optimum living and working environments.

Environmental analysis is the observation and quantification of the physical, biological and cultural assets and phenomena of a particular site. A context- sensitive approach to sustainable site planning and development recognizes inherent site problems or constraints, and capitalizes on inherent site assets, or opportunities.

A Playful Approach to Understanding 20th Century Architectural Styles

Arch 3314 · Online

Instructor: Noémie Despland-Lichtert

In this project-based seminar, students will research, write, and illustrate iconic works of architecture to create a card game aiming at learning and teaching architectural styles and movements. Adopting a playful approach, students will gain research skills and historical understanding of architecture lineage of the 20th century.