Texas Tech University

2017 Art History Symposium

October 14, 2017 from 1:00-4:45 PM
Museum of Texas Tech University

Texas Tech University School of Art, in collaboration with the Museum of Texas Tech University, presents the 2017 Art History Symposium on October 14th, 2017 from 1:00 PM to 4:45 PM in the Helen DeVitt Jones Auditorium of the Museum of Texas Tech. This symposium is free and open to the public, with a public reception to follow the presentations.

The symposium will feature presentations of current research by four Texas Tech School of Art faculty on a wide range of topics and interests in art and art history. From the medieval to modern, each presentation wonderfully represents the diversity of Art History subject matter. Each presentation will be about 30 minutes followed by a Q&A session.

Presentation schedule is as follows:
1:00 PM: Welcome
1:15 PM: Janis Elliott, Ph.D.
 - "The Hungarian Angevin Legendary: A Multicultural Book of the Lives of the Saints."
2:00 PM: Brian Steele, Ph.D. - "Angelic Choirs and Musical Practice, Devotional Visions and Celestial Ecstasy in Sixteenth-Century Italy."
2:45 PM: Francisco Ortega-Grimaldo, Ph.D. - "The Wacky in Wackyland: The Meta-Fictional in American Animated Cartoons."
3:30 PM: Jorgelina Orfila, Ph.D. - "When Voice is more than Speech: An Analysis of Charlie Kaufmann's Anomalisa (2015)."
4:15 - 4:45 PM: Reception

Elliott
Magdalen cycle, Vat.Lat. 8541, f.104r

Janis Elliott, Ph.D. - "The Hungarian Angevin Legendary: A Multicultural Book of the Lives of the Saints."
The Hungarian Angevin Legendary is a picture book of saints' lives, including the litany of Roman saints, Angevin and Capetian family saints, and Hungarian saints. The largest preserved sections of the manuscript are in Vatican City at the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (Ms. Vat. Lat. 8541) and in New York at the Pierpont Morgan Library (MS 360). There is general agreement that the Hungarian Angevin Legendary was created during the reign of Charles Robert (aka Carobert), King of Hungary (r. 1308-1342) who was a nephew of King Robert of Naples (r. 1309-1343). Dr. Elliott will focus on the fact that there is no text, only rubricated captions under each page of illustrations. This paper examines this phenomenon within the context of other picture books with limited texts, such as the French Bibles Moralis√©es, and within its own context as a book of saints' lives written for a prince.

 

Steele
Eusebio da San Giorgio, Adoration of the Magi, 1505.

Brian Steele, Ph.D. - "Angelic Choirs and Musical Practice, Devotional Visions and Celestial Ecstasy in Sixteenth-Century Italy."
Angelic consorts in sixteenth-century Italian art often observe a genre-like distinction between loud and soft instruments, but some celestial ensembles maintain an indiscriminate admixture of instrumentation that evokes ecstasy rather than reality. Dr. Steele places varied examples within accounts of performance, music theory, and devotional literature. They suggest an evolving context that gradually privileged strings and vocal performance, while the imaginatively mixed choirs that artists envision intimate neither theory nor practice but rather the celestial ecstasy articulated in devotional literature.

 

Ortega
"Wackyland Dodo Bird" by Matthew Hunter

Francisco Ortega-Grimaldo "The Wacky in Wackyland: The Meta-Fictional in American Animated Cartoons."
This presentation explores "Wackyland" as a surreal fissure within cartoons' fictional worlds. Introduced to us in the 1938 animation "Porky in Wackyland" this dimension presents meta fictional elements that go beyond the breaking of the fourth wall. The paper argues that this over-eccentric, meta-fantastic dimension -- one that is beyond the understanding of the staple cartoon characters -- makes their fantastic nature and behavior look more "real" and coherent.

 

Orfila
Charilie Kaufman and Duke Johnson,  Anomalisa (2015), film still.

Jorgelina Orfila, Ph.D. - "When Voice is more than Speech: An Analysis of Charlie Kaufmann's Anomalisa (2015)."
Until recently, film and animation studies centered on the analysis of visual images and tended to disregard the importance of sound in both mediums. This paper examines the use of sound and voice in the 2015 stop motion feature film Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson). Unpacking the voice's role in building the movie's characters and plot structure helps us to better understand animation's distinct nature as an audio-visual medium.

This paper was presented at the Society of Animation Studies Annual Conference, Padua 2017 with special thanks to Dean Noel Zahler and a Dean's Advancing Creative Scholarship Award.