Texas Tech University

This Week: February 18th - 24th

Miguel Brieva: Welcome to the World 
Art Building Studio Gallery 
January 19th - March 3rd
RECEPTION: Thursday, February 28th from 5:30 - 6:30 PM.

Welcome to the World

Michael Borowski: Home Reports
Art Building SRO Photo Gallery
February 13th - March 17th

Borowski - London 13

Colin Tuis Nesbit: I'm not made for love 
SOA Satellite Gallery at CASP by appointment
Artist's Talk: Friday, February 22nd at Noon in Art 102

Colin Nesbit

Nesbit's work will fill the gallery with projected archival footage of Judy Garland singing "Ol' Man River," from Show Boat and purple light from two artist made chandeliers modeled from those on the opulent Mississippi riverboat J. M. White. Colin Tuis Nesbit is an artist and independent curator originally from St. Louis and currently practicing in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Nesbit holds a BFA and MFA in Drawing and Printmaking. His creative practice draws from phenomenology, investigating "sensory experience of specific objects, images, and spaces." His most recent curatorial project was presented at Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa in 2018.

Also of Interest This Week

Land Arts of the American West - 2018 Season Exhibition
Leonardo's Kitchen, Museum of TTU
OPENING RECEPTION: Saturday, February 23rd, 6:00-8:00 PM

Land Arts

Lubbock-Con 2019
Lubbock Memorial Civic Center
February 23rd & 24th

Lubbock-Con

COMING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28th

THE LIFE AND ART OF YAYOI KUSAMA
Thursday, February 28th
7:00 at Alamo Drafthouse Cinema [FREE - Reserve your seats now] 

Kusama

KUSAMA: INFINITY producer Karen Johnson will be at the Lubbock screening to discuss the film. This showing at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is in partnership with Texas Tech's International Film Series and TTU School of Art.

Now the top-selling female artist in the world, Yayoi Kusama overcame impossible odds to bring her radical artistic vision to the world stage.

For decades, her work pushed boundaries that often alienated her from both her peers and those in power in the art world. Kusama was an underdog with everything stacked against her: the trauma of growing up in Japan during World War II, life in a dysfunctional family that discouraged her creative ambitions, sexism and racism in the art establishment, mental illness in a culture where that was particularly shameful and even continuing to pursue and be devoted to her art full time on the cusp of her 90s.