Books From A Dynamic Faculty

The following titles are among the most recently authored across a spectrum of disciplines in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Arts & Sciences faculty are encouraged to send book announcements to Senior Editor Toni Salama, Office of the Dean, College of Arts & Sciences.

Recent Books


 

"BORN TO BE WILD: THE RISE OF THE AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST"

Born to be Wild by Randy D. McBee

Randy D. McBee, Associate Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences and Associate Professor in the Department of History, traces the growth of an American subculture--and the alarm it sparked--when the stereotypical leather-clad biker emerged after world War II. And yet, in more recent years, the once-menacing motorcyclist became mainstream. McBee narrates the arc of motorcycle culture since World War II. Along the way he examines the rebelliousness of early riders of the 1940s and 1950s, riders' increasing connection to violence and the counterculture in the 1960s and 1970s, the rich urban bikers of the 1990s and 2000s, and the factors that gave rise to a motorcycle rights movement. McBee's fascinating narrative of motorcycling's past and present reveals the biker as a crucial character in 20th-century American life. (University of North Carolina Press, July 2015)


 

“A COMPARATIVE DOXASTIC-PRACTICE EPISTEMOLOGY OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE”

Mark Webb, Texas Tech, Christianity, Buddhism, comparison, epistemology

Mark Webb, Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy, takes a theoretical enterprise in Christian philosophy of religion and applies it to Buddhism in this second volume in the SpringerBriefs in Religious Studies series. Webb contends that mystical experiences can be fruitfully thought of as perceptual in kind and that they are therefore good prima facie grounds for religious belief, in the absence of defeating conditions. Webb’s work goes on to explore Christian and Buddhist testimony and how the likelihood of self-deception, self-delusion, imaginative elaboration and the like constitutes a defeating condition, which is shown to have less scope for operation in the Buddhist case than in the Christian case. (Springer 2015)


 

"COMPETING VISIONS OF EMPIRE: LABOR, SLAVERY AND THE ORIGINS OF THE BRITISH ATLANTIC EMPIRE"

Abigail Swingen, Assistant Professor in the Department of History, provides a new framework for understanding the origins of the British Empire in this insightful study. Swingen explores how England’s original imperial designs influenced contemporary English politics and debates about labor, economy, and overseas trade. Further, by focusing on the ideological connections between the growth of unfree labor in the English colonies, particularly the use of enslaved Africans, and the development of British imperialism during the early modern period, Swingen examines the overlapping, often competing agendas of planters, merchants, privateers, colonial officials, and imperial authorities in the 17th and 18th centuries. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, February 2015)


 

"TEATRO"

George Cole, Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of the Division of Spanish & Portuguese in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, sets this Spanish-language book in Los Angeles, exploring illegal immigration and racial/class tensions as it follows two young lovers who face a society trying to tear them apart.

La indocumentada es la historia de dos jóvenes, Charles y Julia, que se enamoran perdidamente pero tendrán que enfrentarse a una sociedad que tratará de separarlos. Ambientada en Los Ángeles, la pieza explora el tema de la inmigración ilegal, la falta de comprensión del lado humano de la misma, así como las tensiones raciales y de clases que se ven tanto en esta zona como en otras regiones de los Estados Unidos. (Editorial GC; December 2014)


 

“MEXICAN AMERICAN BASEBALL IN THE ALAMO REGION”

Mexican American Baseball in the Alamo Region

Jorge Iber, Associate Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences and Professor in the Department of History, celebrates baseball as it was played in the Tejano and Tejana communities throughout Texas in this co-authored book. This forthcoming regional focus explores the importance of the game at a time when Spanish-speaking people were demanding cultural acceptance and civil rights in cities like San Antonio, Corpus Christi, and New Braunfels—All of which had thriving Mexican-American communities that found comfort in the game and pride in their abilities on the playing field. (Mount Pleasant, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing, forthcoming.


 

"ESTELAS EN LA MAR: CANTOS SENTIMENTALES"

Estelas by Genaro Perez

Genaro Pérez, Professor of Spanish in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, published a book titled: "Estelas En La Mar: Cantos Sentimentales." Written in Spanish, this is Pérez's 13th book—his fifth of poetry—and covers topics of love, aging, and dementia. (Bloomington, Ind.: iUniverse; 2014)


 

“A CONCEPTUAL GUIDE TO THERMODYNAMICS”

A Conceptual guide to Thermodynamics

Bill Poirier, Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, introduces a new concept in interdisciplinary pedagogy. Providing clear explanations for core topics such as entropy, and working in conjunction with over 70 standard thermodynamics textbooks used in various science and engineering fields, the book has consistently remained one of the best-selling thermodynamics titles since its release. (Oxford UK: John Wiley & Sons, September 2014)


 

“GULAG TOWN, COMPANY TOWN: FORCED LABOR AND ITS LEGACY IN VORKUTA”

Alan Barenberg, Texas Tech, Gulag Town, Vortuka

Alan Barenberg, Assistant Professor in the Department of History, offers a radical reassessment of the infamous “Gulag Archipelago” by exploring the history of Vorkuta, an arctic coal-mining outpost originally established in the 1930s as a prison camp complex. Hiss eye-opening study reveals Vorkuta as an active urban center with a substantial non-prisoner population. It was a place where the borders separating camp and city were contested and permeable, enabling prisoners to establish social connections that would eventually aid them in their transitions to civilian life. With this book, Barenberg makes an important historical contribution to our understanding of forced labor in the Soviet Union. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, August 2014)


 

"REVISITING CONVIVENCIA IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN IBERIA"

Revisitng Covivencia by Connie Scarborough

Connie Scarborough, Professor of Spanish in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, editied this collection of articles by 18 prominent Hispanists who explore the centuries in the Iberian Peninsula when Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in harmony with one another. The term convivencia has been applied, both inside and outside academic circles, to imply a "golden age" of multi-religious, amicable harmony. (Juan de la Cuesta-Hispanic Monographs; June 2014)


 

“LATINO AMERICAN WRESTLING EXPERIENCE: OVER 100 YEARS OF WRESTLING HERITAGE IN THE UNITED STATES”

Jorge Iber, Book, Latino Wrestling, TTU, College of Arts & Sciences

Jorge Iber, Associate Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences and Professor in the Department of History, brings a century's worth of Spanish-speaking student wrestlers and coaches--high school, collegiate, and post-graduate--into the spotlight through 60-plus stories of individual accomplishment and triumph. (Stillwater, Okla.: National Wrestling Hall of Fame, e-book, March 2014)


 

“MEMORY OF BLUE”

Jacqueline Kolosov, TTU, Memory of Blue

Jacqueline Kolosov, Professor in the Department of English, contemplates our inner lives, the connections that bind us to each other, and the joy to be found in the everyday, in “Memory of Blue." Kolosov dedicates this third poetry collection to the late Margaret Sheffield Lutherer, who served Texas Tech for many years. Kolosov will donate 50 percent of book-sale proceeds to a local charity that rescues horses. (Knockeven, Ireland: Salmon Poetry, February 2014)


 

"THE AESTHETICS OF GRAMMAR: SOUND AND MEANING IN THE LANGUAGES OF MAINLAND SOUTHEAST ASIA"

Jeffrey Williams, TTU, Arts & Sciences, Linguistics, Anthropology, The Aesthetics of Grammar, Cambridge Press

Jeffrey Williams, Professor of Anthropology, provides, in this ground-breaking volume, a detailed comparative overview of the mechanisms by which the aesthetic qualities of speech become grammatical works of art that express and convey emotions, senses, conditions and perceptions that enrich discourse. (Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, November 2013)


 

"BREAST OR BOTTLE: CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIES IN INFANT-FEEDING POLICY AND PRACTICE"

Amy Koerber, Associate Professor of Communication & Rhetoric in the Department of English, analyzes the changing rhetoric of infant-feeding discourse through critical examination of scientific and medical controversies and the way in which medical beliefs are communicated to the public. (Columbia, S.C.: The University of South Carolina Press, May 2013)


 

"INSCRIBING THE ENVIRONMENT: ECOCRITICAL APPROACHES TO MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE"

Connie L. Scarborough, Professor in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, applies the concepts of ecocriticism to key, canonical works from medieval Spain with an eye to authors’ depictions, realistic and symbolic, of their natural surroundings. Scarborough shows how descriptions of the natural world in these texts are informed by both the authors’ perceptions of the environment and established literary models. (Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, April 2013)


 

"ePORTFOLIO PERFORMANCE SUPPORT SYSTEMS: CONSTRUCTING, PRESENTING, AND ASSESSING PORTFOLIOS"

Co-edited by Rich Rice, Associate Professor of Technical Communication and Rhetoric in the Department of English, this 12-essay collection examines the ways in which ePortfolios can facilitate sustainable and measureable writing-related student development, assessment and accountability, learning and knowledge transfer, and principles related to universal design for learning, just-in-time support, interaction design, and usability testing. (Ft. Collins, Colo.: The WAC Clearinghouse & Anderson, S.C.: Parlor Press, April 2013)


 

“CANINES IN CERVANTES AND VELAZQUEZ: AN ANIMAL STUDIES READING OF EARLY MODERN SPAIN”

John Beusterien, Associate Professor and Director of the Comparative Literature Program in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures, studies the representation of dogs in literature and art in early modern Spain (London: Ashgate, April 2013)


 

"EMPIRE OF IDEAS: THE ORIGINS OF PUBLIC DIPLOMACY
AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF U.S. FOREIGN POLICY"

Justin Hart, Associate Professor of U.S. and Foreign Relations in the Department of History, explores the role of propaganda and public relations in the Roosevelt and Truman years (New York: Oxford University Press, January 2013)


 

"OPERATION SCREWTAPE: THE ART OF SPIRITUAL WAR"

Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics Andrew Farley's Latest Novel Brings the Spiritual Warfare of C.S. Lewis' "The Screwtape Letters" into the Data-Driven 21st Century (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Publishing Group, December 2012)


 

"ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONVERSATIONS THROUGH A DISCIPLINE"

Co-edited by Christopher Witmore, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Classics, Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures (London: Routledge, November 2012)


 

"ARCHAEOLOGY: THE DISCIPLINE OF THINGS"

Co-authored by Christopher Witmore, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Classics, Department of Classical & Modern Languages & Literatures (Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, November 2012


 

"WORKING THEORIES FOR TEACHING ASSISTANT DEVELOPMENT:
TIME-TESTED AND ROBUST THEORIES..."

Edited by Associate Professor Greta Gorsuch, Department of Classical & Modern Languages Literatures (Stillwater, Okla.: New Forums Press, October 2012)


 

"WORDS BEFORE DAWN"

English Professor William Wenthe's Third Book of Poetry (Baton Rouge, La.; Louisiana State University Press, October 2012)


 

"MILITARIZING THE BORDER: WHEN MEXICANS BECAME THE ENEMY"

Book: Militarizing the Border

Assistant History Professor Miguel Levario's New Book Shows How the Past Influences the Present (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, September 2012)


 

"THE CONTINUUM COMPANION TO AESTHETICS"

Edited by Associate Philosophy Professor Anna Ribeiro (London: Continuum Books, May 2012)


 

"ARISTOTLE AND THE VIRTUES"

Book: Militarizing the Border

Howard J. Curzer, Professor in the Department of Philosophy, works through Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics virtue-by-virtue, explaining and generally defending Aristotle's claims. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, May 2012)


 

"LATINO AMERICAN CINEMA: AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MOVIES, STARS, CONCEPTS AND TRENDS"

Book: Latinos in American Cinema

Associate English Professor Scott L. Baugh Specializes in Film Studies and Latin American Culture (Santa Barbara, Calif.; Greenwood, April 2012)


 

"WOMEN WRITERS AND THE ARTIFACTS OF CELEBRITY IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY"

Co-edited by English Professor Ann R. Hawkins (Burlington, Vt;, Ash-gate, February 2012)


 

"THE ESSENTIALS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION"

Second Edition, Co-edited by Outgoing English Department Chair Sam Dragga (New York; Oxford University Press, December 2011)