Texas Tech University

International Student Career Resources

FAQs for International Students Seeking Jobs in the U.S.

If a job posting does not indicate whether or not the employer hires international students, should I still apply?

Often times, employers may not have experience hiring international students. In these cases, it is your responsibility to educate the employers about the process of hiring an international student and sponsoring for an H-1B visa. However, be mindful that you still may not get the job. Therefore, we recommend targeting employers with a history of petitioning for H-1B visas, by looking at websites, such as MyVisaJobs.com, Hire Red Raiders, and Vault.

Should I include my work authorization status in my resume or CV?

No, you should not include your visa status in your resume or CV. Similarly, you should not include your age, gender, race/ethnicity, religion, marital status, home country, or photograph. In all situations, you should never lie about your work status. Given the reservations some employers have about hiring an international student, it is not to your advantage to draw attention to your status during the application process.

However, if your name "sounds" foreign and you are a green card holder or U.S. citizen, you may want to include your visa status or citizenship on your resume to indicate that you are already legally authorized to work in the U.S.

When do I reveal my work authorization status with potential employers?

It depends. Although it is illegal for a potential employer to ask about your race, nationality, native language, or immigration status, they must ask if you are authorized to work in the U.S or if you will now or in the future require sponsorship for an employment visa. You can wait until employers bring up the subject, but be sure to mention it by the end the interview.

Also realize that being an international student can be an asset to many employers. Having multi-lingual abilities, experience of living in other cultures, and determination to work in the U.S. convey to the potential employers that you can overcome challenges and work hard.

How would I answer if asked by an employer about my work authorization in the U.S. (for F-1 student)?

If you are applying for Optional Practical Training (OPT), explain that you are eligible to work in the U.S. for one year after the OPT is authorized (students in the STEM field may have the option to extend this period), and this process requires very little work on the employers' part. Next, discuss that your work authorization can be extended for another three to six years with an H-1B visa. Avoid saying the word "sponsor" when talking about the H-1B application process, instead use the phrase "petition."

How do I get specific immigration information about my work authorization in the U.S.?

Please refer to the TTU Office of International Affairs website about international student employment in the U.S. If you have additional questions, you can make an appointment with your international student advisor through the website.

How can I learn more about the job search process and develop myself professionally?

Contact the UCC to schedule an appointment with a Career Representative and look over the UCC website to see all the resources available to TTU students and alumni.

References:

Loyola University New Orleans
Michigan State University

How to Find U.S. Employment Opportunities for International Students

Below are some helpful resources in finding jobs and internships for international students.

1. MyVisaJobs.com*

MyVisaJobs.com provides a free list of employers who have petitioned for H-1B visas in the past. This site also includes employers who have sponsored for Permanent Residency (Green Card).

2. Hire Red Raiders

Hire Red Raiders assists in finding internships and jobs specifically for TTU students and alumni. After selecting a position from the job search, you may be able to find whether employers are willing to support an H-1B visa by the indication of "Employment (H-1) Visa" in the "Work Authorization" section of that position. If you would like to further discuss potential employers who may support an H-1B visa, please make an appointment at the TTU University Career Center (806-742-2210).
Below are some helpful resources for information regarding visas and the immigration process.

1. InternationalStudent.com*

The InternationalStudent.com assists in finding visa, immigration, and other career related information such as tips for writing resumes and personal statements. It also assists in finding available jobs and internships to enhance your career.

2. U.S. Department of Labor

The U.S. Department of Labor generates annual reports on labor certifications. This website provides a report of top occupations for H-1B by state, top 10 employers sponsoring for H-1B, and top occupation areas for permanent residency applications. It also provides detailed information regarding various permanent and temporary employment visas and certifications.

3. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) provides answers to questions about on/off campus work and required employment records for students with an F-1 visa, the typical student visa.

4. Vault

Vault allows students to research companies through company reviews written by employees who work there. Additionally, Vault offers articles that may be beneficial for international students.

5. Homeland Security: Study in the States

The Department of Homeland Security provides basic information regarding the work authorization process.

Reference:

Union Graduate College
* The University Career Center does not sponsor or endorse these resources.

Employer Resource

Employer Brochure for Recruiting International Students

All international students must consult with your international student counselor at the TTU Office of International Affairs regarding your visa status and to follow an appropriate procedure to obtain employment authorization in the United States.

 

Contact

University Career Center