What can I do with this degree?
TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

AREAS
TECHNICAL WRITING
Technical writers, also called technical communicators, produce instructions, proposals, reports, and
other electronic and paper documents to communicate complex and technical information more easily. Most of the material they develop is designed for online delivery. Technical communicators also develop, gather, and disseminate technical information among experts and the public.

EMPLOYERS
Large corporations
Industries, including high tech, manufacturing, and healthcare
Government agencies, including Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of State, Veterans Affairs, National Archives and Records Admin.
Trade, professional, or consumer publications
Internet sites
Self-employed/Freelance
Nonprofit organizations

STRATEGIES
Minor in a technical or scientific subject to gain knowledge about technical areas and trends. Become familiar with proposal writing. Gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs. Join the Society for Technical Communication (
http://stc.org) and its local chapter (http://www.english.ttu.edu/tcr/stc/ ).

AREAS
TECHNICAL EDITING

Technical editors prepare the work of technical writers, scientists, engineers, and other professionals for publication.

EMPLOYERS
Large corporations
Industries, including high tech, manufacturing, and healthcare
Government agencies, including Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of State, Veterans Affairs, National Archives and Records Admin.
Internet sites
Trade, professional, or consumer publications
Self-employed/Freelance
Nonprofit organizations

STRATEGIES
Minor in a technical or scientific subject to gain knowledge about technical areas and trends. Gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs. Join the Society for Technical Communication (
http://stc.org), its Technical Editing Special Interest Group (http://www.stc-techedit.org ) and its local chapter (http://www.english.ttu.edu/tcr/stc/ ).

AREAS
INFORMATION DESIGNER

Information designers design visual and software interfaces to disseminate technical and scientific information through web sites and other publications.

Large corporations
Industries, including high tech, manufacturing, and healthcare
Government agencies, including Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of State, Veterans Affairs, National Archives and Records Admin.
Internet sites
Trade, professional, or consumer publications
Self-employed/Freelance
Nonprofit organizations

STRATEGIES
Minor in a technical or scientific subject to gain knowledge about technical areas and trends. Learn how to use design software to manage page layout, typography, and graphics. Gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs. Join the Society for Technical Communication (
http://stc.org) and its local chapter (http://www.english.ttu.edu/tcr/stc/ ).

AREAS
INFORMATION ARCHITECT

Information architects make sure that all of the people who need information can get it easily. They do so by designing systems of information, including databases, using technologies such as XML.

STRATEGIES
Minor in a technical or scientific subject to gain knowledge about technical areas and trends. Learn international coding and markup languages like HTML, CSS, XML, MYSQL, and PHP. Gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs. Join the Society for Technical Communication (
http://stc.org) its local chapter (http://www.english.ttu.edu/tcr/stc/ ), and the Information Architecture Institute (http://iainstitute.org/ ).

 

AREAS
USABILITY EXPERT

Usability experts test web sites, documents, products, and software interfaces to make sure that users can get the information they need when they need it. Usability experts learn how to use empirical techniques such as usability testing and eye tracking to determine where information systems cause problems with users. Then they use that information to help redesign the systems for greater usability.

STRATEGIES
Minor in a technical or scientific subject to gain knowledge about technical areas and trends. Take courses in usability testing and research methods. Gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs. Join the Society for Technical Communication (
http://stc.org) its local chapter (http://www.english.ttu.edu/tcr/stc/ ), and the Usability Professionals’ Association (http://www.upassoc.org ).

GENERAL INFORMATION
A major in Technical Communication can be a great foundation for a career in almost any industry, government agency, or nonprofit. The skills you learn as a technical communicator – how to analyze audiences, assess situations, and use communication to solve problems – will apply in almost any career or job you find open to you.

Develop a specialty area of interest via additional coursework and/or work experience for greater marketability within a specific industry.

Save samples of written work to be used for a portfolio.

Conduct informational interviews or shadow professionals in careers of interest to learn more about their jobs.