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French Graduate Courses

To see a full list of French Graduate courses please use the Texas Tech online catalog.

4308: French and Francophone Culture Through Film

This course aims at learning and communicating French culture through the film medium. Students will build vocabulary, grammar, and fluency while learning about issues relating to contemporary French society.

 

4315: The French Short Story

This course provides an introduction to the richness and diversity of the French short story from various critical perspectives that take into account its formal aspects and historical presence. Students will familiarize themselves with the two dominant short-story forms in France—le conte and la nouvelle—analyzing representative examples and identifying their recurring structures and themes.

 

4317: Readings in French Literature and Culture

This course provides an overview of major literary works and cultural milestones of nineteenth- and twentieth-century France.

 

4322: French Civilization

A survey of French civilization from the Middle Ages to the present: literature, art, music, philosophy, science, and architecture.

 

5315-001: Immigrant Culture of France Through the Novel and Film

In this course, we will examine Francophone “immigrant” literature, culture, and film through various texts and productions of the descendents of the North African and Caribbean immigrants in France. We will explore this recent challenge to French culture and society, which invites the reconsideration of France as a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural civilization. The texts studied illustrate the contradictions linked to the post-colonial situation in France through important issues such as language, identity, the social status of minorities, the role of the school system for different social groups and the question of nationality. There will be also an emphasis on the originality of these writings (style, slang, humor, expression in relationship with gender, and the importance of music and cinema). This will involve the discussion of “Beur” films.

We will also study literary and critical theory concepts, and view and discuss documentaries and films on the authors depending on time and availability.

 

5319: Nineteenth-Century Literature

This seminar takes as its point of departure the historical and theoretical dimensions of the nineteenth-century novel with special attention given to the competing ideologies that make up the period. The novel was able to mediate many upheavals in a century which included technological revolutions, political instability, and the emergence of a powerful bourgeoisie class. In many prefaces, the authors set their sights on painting a more complete picture of nineteenth-century French society. Despite an ideal of truthfulness and reliability in the narrative voice, the novel remains a highly specialized art form whose techniques evolved radically in the nineteenth century. The extensive use of detailed description, subversive narrative strategies, and inventive structures contribute to making the novel highly "aware" of its status as a work of art. This course will also serve as an introduction to contemporary criticism on the novel.

 

5320-001: 20th & 21st Century French Culture and Literature

(From 1900 to the Present) This course consists of an overview of twentieth-twenty first century French culture and literature. We will focus on some of the most important writers. We will study how their work simultaneously expressed socio-cultural concerns and contributed to reflect on essential issues in contemporary France. We will also learn how their production transformed its culture and literature by inducing new writing techniques and developing modern theoretical perspectives such as psychoanalysis, autobiographical writing and esthetic movements such as surrealism, “engagement,” existentialism, feminism, and the New Novel. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as on the historical, political and artistic context of the day.

We will also study literary and critical theory concepts, and view and discuss documentaries and films on the authors depending on time and availability.

 

5321: French Cinema

The story of French cinema is a narrative of its transformations: from a technological innovation to a form of divertissement, from a documentary to the mise en scène, and from a narrative art to its own art form. As such, we will also be looking at the theoretical dimensions of cinema: the signification of techniques such as camera angles, montage, slow motion, zoom, etc. This course seeks to provide an overview of French cinema, an appreciation of the works which brought new techniques and perspectives to French cinema.

 

5327: French Civilization

This course will focus on the development of French culture from the nineteenth century to the present day. It will deal not only with key politico-historical moments from the past but the multiples ways in which they have left a lasting mark on today’s France. Students will explore art, philosophy, history, politics, food and architecture from critical perspectives which emphasize modes of cultural exchange and meaning.

 

5328-001: African-Carribean Cultures and Literatures

(From “Négritude” to “Créolité” and “Mondialité”)

This course focuses on the conditions of emergence and on the development of Francophone cultures and literatures in Africa and the Caribbean. There will be an equal emphasis on the issues raised in decisive theoretical texts and on representative literary works. Our goal is to explore the (inherent) connections between the two forms of expression and to achieve an understanding of the intellectual, aesthetic and linguistic legacies that have enabled the production of narratives that make these specific cultures and literatures.

This course will discuss a set of concerns including culture and literature as a production, a form and an institution which contribute to the formation of the epistemological/ontological categories of identity, difference, and gender, to the anthropological categories of language, culture and representation, and to the ideological and political categories of nation and race. We will complete our work by thinking about the multiple relationships between Francophone African and Caribbean productions and international literatures. We will conclude it with a discussion of the concept of Francophonie with which they are connected.

We will also study literary and critical theory concepts, and view and discuss documentaries and films on the authors depending on time and availability.

 

5328-002: Quebec Culture and Literature

This course consists of an overview of the history of Canada and Quebec and its study through twentieth century Quebecois literature and culture. We will focus on some of the most important writers and poets, as well as on Diasporic culture and “migrant” cultural productions. We will study how their work simultaneously expressed socio-cultural concerns, contributed to reflect on essential issues in contemporary Quebec and Canada and transformed their societies, cultures, and identities by inducing new themes, debates and writing techniques, by expressing contemporary ideological issues and by developing modern aesthetic movements. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as on their historical and contemporary political and artistic contexts.

We will also study literary and critical theory concepts, and view and discuss documentaries and films on the authors depending on time and availability.

 

5329: Literary Criticism and Theory

This course provides an introduction to the major principles of literary criticism and theory from both a historical and theoretical perspective. The historical dimension involves charting the flow of ideas that make up literary discourse in France and elsewhere. How was theory introduced, received and exported from France? Is there a French hegemony in literary theorization? The formal dimension of the class considers theory in its forms and structures. How do we speak about the complex relationship between language and meaning, between theory and the literary text, between theory and literary history? Is theory itself a specific genre? Students will gain in their appreciation and knowledge of the major movements in literary criticism.