Political Communication Research Cluster

Shannon Bichard, Advertising Department Chairperson, Associate Professor

Shannon Bichard, Advertising Department Chairperson

Dr. Bichard's research interests focus on social media use in political contexts. She is primarily interested in the study of agenda-setting, framing, uses/gratifications, and selective exposure as theoretical underpinnings for her political analyses.

Contact:shannon.bichard@ttu.edu

Sample Publications:

Parmelee, John. & Bichard, Shannon. (2012). Politics and the Twitter Revolution: How Tweets Influence the Relationship between Political Leaders and the Public. Lexington Books: A Division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Lanham, Maryland.

Zhang, Weiwu; Seltzer, Trent; & Bichard, Shannon. (2013). Two Sides of the Coin: Assessing the Influence of Social Network Site Use During the 2012 U.S. Presidential Campaign. Social Science Computer Review. Vol. 31 (5), pp. 542-551.

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Erik Bucy, Regents Professor of Strategic Communication

Erik Bucy, Regents Professor of Strategic Communication

Dr. Bucy’s research interests include analysis of nonverbal communication in political news and cognitive and emotional processing of televised leader displays. He is the co-author of Image Bite Politics: News and the Visual Framing of Elections (Oxford, 2009), winner of two outstanding book awards, and editor of the Sourcebook for Political Communication Research: Methods, Measures, and Analytical Techniques (Routledge, 2011). Bucy is the editor of the peer-reviewed journal, Politics and the Life Sciences.

Contact: erik.bucy@ttu.edu

Sample Publications

Bucy, E. P., & Bradley, S. D. (2011). What the Body Can Tell Us About Politics: The Use of Psychophysiological Measures in Political Communication Research. In E. P. Bucy & R. L. Holbert (Eds.), Sourcebook for Political Communication Research: Methods, Measures, and Analytical Techniques (pp. 525-540). New York: Routledge.

Bucy, E. P. (2010). Nonverbal Communication, Emotion, and Political Evaluation. In E. Konijn, K. Koveling, & C. von Scheve (Eds.), Handbook of Emotions and Mass Media (pp. 195-220). New York: Routledge.

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Melissa Gotlieb, Assistant Professor

Melissa Gotlieb, Assistant Professor

Dr. Gotlieb's research lies at the intersection of media, politics, and consumer culture. She is particularly interested in the interaction between audience orientations and media messages in the context of youth engagement in expressive politics, such as political consumerism. Her research draws from mass communication, psychology, political science, and marketing.

Contact: melissa.gotlieb@ttu.edu

Sample Publication

Gotlieb, M. R., & Wells, C. (forthcoming). From concerned shopper to dutiful citizen: Implications of individual and collective orientations to political consumerism. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

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Yunjuan Luo, Assistant Professor

Yunjuan Luo, Assistant Professor

Dr. Luo's research interests include new media effects, political communication, international communication, and communication theory, particularly agenda-setting theory. Her current research focuses on the social and political impact of new media, digital media literacy, web credibility, and online social capital.

Contact: yunjuan.luo@ttu.edu

Sample Publication

Luo, Y. (2013). Mapping agenda-setting research in China: A meta -analysis study. Chinese Journal of Communication, 6(3), 269-285.

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Trent Seltzer, Associate Professor

Trent Seltzer, Associate Professor

Dr. Seltzer’s research focuses on organization-public relationships (OPRs), including how politically situated OPRs influence political engagement and policy.

Contact: trent.seltzer@ttu.edu

Sample Publications

Seltzer, T., & Zhang, W. (2011). Debating healthcare reform: How political parties' issue-specific communication influences citizens' perceptions of organization-public relationships. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly.

Seltzer, T., & Zhang, W. (2011). Toward a model of political organization-public relationships: Antecedent and cultivation strategy influence on citizens' relationships with political parties. Journal of Public Relations Research.

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Weiwu Zhang, Associate Professor

Weiwu Zhang, Associate Professor

Dr. Zhang’s research interests include political public relations, communication, social capital and citizen engagement, new media and politics, framing and media relations. Specifically, my programs of research include (a) the effects of mass and interpersonal communication, particularly the Internet, on civic and political participation and on potential dark effects of social capital such as intolerance, (b) the examination of antecedents, processes, and consequences of organization-public relationships in the political context (POPR), and (c) the use of social media in public relations.

Contact: weiwu.zhang@ttu.edu

Sample Publication

Zhang, W., Johnson, T., Seltzer, T., Bichard, S. (2010). The revolution will be networked: The influence of social network sites on political attitudes and behaviors. Social Science Computer Review.

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