Texas Tech University

FAQs

To view specific FAQs click on one of the following categories:

Academics

What if I don't have access to a computer and/or the internet?

Please refer to the Tools for Learning, Teaching, and Working Remotely at Texas Tech page.

Are online courses manageable for students receiving accommodations through Student Disability Services?

Blackboard, the Learning Management System used by Texas Tech, includes resources for several types of accommodations, including the increased time to complete an assignment. Students who have questions about how their accommodations will be managed, given the transition from face-to-face to online instruction should contact Student Disability Services.

Employees (Faculty/Staff/Students)

What can we do to support members of our community from areas where coronavirus is present?

Texas Tech values the many people of different nationalities and cultures who are cherished members of our community. We must avoid stigmatizing anyone who comes from a country where the coronavirus is prevalent or who has been in quarantine.

Should graduate lab assistants employed in a faculty member's research group follow guidance for employees or students?

Please refer to the Texas Tech Human Resources Coronavirus (COVID-19) page .

I'm an undergraduate student working on campus. Do I come back to work?

Please refer to the Texas Tech Human Resources Coronavirus (COVID-19) page .

What can I do if I'm experiencing bias or discrimination?

The Office of Equal Opportunity (EO) upholds each institution's anti-discrimination and anti-retaliation policies and ensures that employees and applicants of the Texas Tech University System are treated fairly, equally and respectfully. An employee who believes they are being discriminated against or harassed based on or related to sex (including pregnancy), race, color, national origin, religion, age, disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity, or other protected categories, classes, or characteristics. Employees may file a grievance with the Office of Equal Opportunity without fear of retaliation. For additional information, please call 806-742-3627 or email eeo@ttu.edu.

I am feeling anxious or worried about the situation surrounding COVID-19. Where can I go for help?

Texas Tech University provides free and confidential counseling services to employees and their immediate family members through an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) at The Counseling Center @ TTUHSC. For additional information or to make an appointment, please call 806-743-1327 or email counselingcenter@ttuhsc.edu.

I am concerned about returning to work. Can I continue to work remotely?

Faculty and staff listed in the Phase II recommendation to return to work who have concerns regarding returning to work during this phase, may continue to work remotely with notification to their respective supervisors.

Is there a way to seek medical care without going to the doctor?

For employees who participate in HealthSelect, the University's medical health plan, virtual doctor visits are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including weekends and holidays. Additional information about this benefit is available on the ERS website . Additionally, the ERS Dr. on Demand website has made available a Coronavirus Assessment to help prepare and protect you and the ones around you. BlueCross BlueShield also offers a 24-hour Nurse Line 1-800-581-0368. In most cases, the virtual doctor and nurse line visits will not have a co-pay.

Does the Texas Tech Student Wellness Center test for the coronavirus?

The university is offering free, non-mandatory COVID-19 testing Aug. 3-24. Students, faculty and staff can pre-register for a date and time at https://texas.curativeinc.com/welcome.

At the conclusion of this testing period, Student Health Services will begin providing testing for students. Faculty and staff should contact their primary care provider or contact (806) 743-2911 to speak to a nurse to assist with information for COVID-19 testing.

Are there new policies in place for employee leave of absence of coronavirus?

Texas Tech Human Resources Coronavirus (COVID-19) page.

Does the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) apply to absences due to COVID-19.

Yes, COVID-19 qualifies as a “serious health condition” under FMLA allowing eligible employees to take FMLA leave if either the employee or an immediate family member is diagnosed with the disease. Please contact the Office of Human Resources with any employee-related questions or concerns by emailing hr.talent.management@ttu.edu or by calling (806) 742-3650.

If I am displaying signs of respiratory symptoms such as coughing or other symptoms identified by the CDC, can my supervisor require me to go to a doctor?

Supervisors should encourage employees to seek medical advice, but they cannot require them to go to the doctor.

Events/Gatherings

Has a decision been made when large gatherings can resume?

Large gatherings of 100 or more people are prohibited. Organizers should postpone the meeting, event, or program, restructure it, or employ remote technology if possible. There are state guidelines on outdoor gatherings over 10 people. Guidance will be coming soon on the University approval process on outdoor events over 10 people. For third-party hosted activities on campus, there may be additional requirements.

Meetings, events, and programs of any size should be reconsidered. Use discretion to minimize all in-person meetings and consider virtual or hybrid delivery.

For additional information, visit Campus Events Guidelines.

Study Abroad

What processes are in place for current and future Study Abroad students?

For specific Study Abroad information, please contact the Office of International Affairs (oia.reception@ttu.edu) if you have additional questions.

Can a student receive a refund for canceled Study Abroad trips?

The University will refund student deposits for canceled Study Abroad trips through their student account. Reimbursements for prepaid expenses such as airline change fees, cancellation penalties, and lost travel-related deposits will be reimbursed through the TTU travel system. The Office of International Affairs will assist students in processing such reimbursements. Students should cancel any remaining reservations as soon as possible to obtain possible refunds and/or unused airfare credits.

Textbook Rental Returns (TTU Barnes & Noble – Student Union Building)

How can I return my rental textbooks?

  • We are now open Monday - Friday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Please use the East side café doors to enter the store as the SUB is still closed.
  • Spring and Summer I rentals can be returned in store or mailed in. A free UPS label is available for all rentals by logging into your bookstore account or clicking the link in the email reminders.
  • Spring rental charges for books not returned will occur August 28, 2020. All Summer rentals are due August 7, 2020 with non-returned charges occurring around August 13, 2020.
  • Web orders are still only being shipped to help with social distancing efforts for the store.

How can I sell my books back to the store?

At this time we are not purchasing textbooks from students. We plan to resume this in December for the Spring 2021 term.

University Status

What plans are in place if the outbreak continues for an extended period of time?

Texas Tech is following the guidance of the CDC and local and state health department officials. The Office of the President is examining potential scenarios to help protect the safety and well-being of faculty, staff, students, and visitors for an extended period of time while maintaining campus operations, even on a limited basis.

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Centers for Disease Control Website
CDC: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Information
CDC: Travel Health Notices
Johns Hopkins Coronavirus (COVID-19) Map

What is COVID-19 and how does it spread?

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus, which can cause illness in humans and animals. Those who have become sick are reported to suffer coughs, fever, breathing difficulties and tiredness. In severe cases, organ failure has been reported.

  • What experts know about COVID-19, a relatively new virus, is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses. The World Health Organization named this illness “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated COVID-19).
  • Person-to-person: The CDC says that the virus is spread mainly from person-to-person, which means those who are in close contact with one another, and/or through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Those droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby and possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • CDC officials say that it is possible a person can contract COVID-19 by touching a surface or an object that has the virus on it, and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes, but they said this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

How serious is COVID-19?

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild to severe, including cases that have resulted in death. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), most people who become infected experience mild illness and recover, but the risk of severe illness is higher in older people and those with underlying conditions such as heart disease, lung disease or diabetes.

What are the symptoms of the coronavirus?

Flu-like symptoms such as fever, cough, shortness of breath and sore throat. For most people who have had the illness, symptoms were mild and resolved after several days. The CDC says people are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic – the sickest. Still, it's possible to spread the disease before showing symptoms, so a person can feel fine and still have it, just as with other viruses. Such cases have been reported, but are not thought to be the main way it spreads. WHO reports that most people – roughly 80 percent – recover from the disease without needing special treatment.

What should I do if I believe I might have the coronavirus or think I have been exposed?

If you or someone you know – especially those with travel exposure – develops symptoms, please seek urgent medical attention. Call ahead before visiting your clinic or emergency room to inform them of your symptoms and concern for COVID-19 infection. Once arrived, stay in the car with mask on, and ask the clinic or emergency room to call you on your cell phone when they are ready to see you. Do not use the waiting room in the clinic or hospital.

How can I protect myself from getting COVID-19?

We ask all employees and students to help the Texas Tech University community stay well by taking the following steps to reduce the transmission of communicable diseases.

  • Masks or face coverings are required in campus buildings and external areas where appropriate social distancing is not possible.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Wash your hands frequently with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your mouth with tissues whenever you sneeze, and discard used tissues in the trash. If a tissue is not available, sneeze or cough into your elbow or upper sleeve, not into your hand.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick with respiratory symptoms.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Consider using telephone and video conferencing instead of face-to-face meetings, if available, during this outbreak. If face-to-face meetings are unavoidable, meet in a large room to avoid close contact.
  • Refrain from shaking hands.

Is there a vaccine, drug or treatment for COVID-19?

Medical experts across the globe are rushing to find a cure. However, there is not one at this time. The disease is viral, which means antibiotics will not help; the antiviral drugs that work against the flu do not work against coronavirus. Those with a weak immune system and those who already are sick are urged to be especially cautious.

What is the risk to those living in Texas for developing Coronavirus?

Cases continue to rise in Texas, as they do around the United States. Continue to avoid close contact with people who are sick; avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth; stay home when you are sick; cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash; avoid shaking hands; clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

How widespread is the virus?

As of August 10, there have been more than 20,119,511 total cases reported worldwide. In the United States, more than 5,095,163 cases have been confirmed in many states. The number of cases being reported globally – including in the United States – will increase significantly in the days and weeks ahead, as testing for COVID-19 becomes more available. This is not necessarily cause for additional alarm as it is likely that there have been many existing cases that have not been identified, and the additional information will help improve the understanding of and response to the virus. Visit the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Global Cases Map from Johns Hopkins for the latest data.

How can I track the COVID-19 outbreak?

There are a number of online resources for tracking the number of reported cases of COVID-19 globally. Johns Hopkins University is maintaining an interactive map that is gathering data from a number of sources. See Johns Hopkins map.

Are there confirmed cases of COVID-19 on campus or in the surrounding community?

As of August 10, there are 6,222 confirmed cases in Lubbock County and 80 deaths related to COVID-19. Visit the City of Lubbock COVID-19 page for the latest data.

Is the University working with local, state and federal health officials?

The University remains in constant contact with the City of Lubbock Health Department and continues to follow the coronavirus guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control.

What steps is Texas Tech taking to help protect the safety and well-being of faculty, staff and students?

  • The University canceled all classes for the week of March 23-27 following spring break. Beginning March 30, all classes resumed with online instruction.
  • The University's ongoing monitoring of COVID-19 is being coordinated by the Office of the President.
  • The University is working closely with medical personnel from the TTU Health Sciences Center and City of Lubbock Health Department to do everything possible to ensure the health of the campus, Lubbock and surrounding communities.
  • Upon initial concerns surrounding coronavirus in January, we recalled one student from China, who has continued his studies in Lubbock, and altered the study abroad program for two other students to avoid a stay in China. Three students studying abroad this semester in Italy were brought home in early March, due to the increasing spread of the virus. These students were required to self-isolate for 14 days, before receiving medical clearance to return to campus. Additionally, Texas Tech has brought home more than 100 students – many currently in affected countries – from study abroad programs.

Where can I find the most up to date information about Texas Tech's response to COVID-19?

The President's Office maintains a webpage that has the most up to date information available.

Does the Texas Tech Student Wellness Center test for the coronavirus?

The university is offering free, non-mandatory COVID-19 testing Aug. 3-24. Students, faculty and staff can pre-register for a date and time at https://texas.curativeinc.com/welcome.

At the conclusion of this testing period, Student Health Services will begin providing testing for students. Faculty and staff should contact their primary care provider or contact (806) 743-2911 to speak to a nurse to assist with information for COVID-19 testing.

What should I do if I believe I might have the coronavirus or think I have been exposed?

If you or someone you know – especially those with travel exposure – develops symptoms, please seek urgent medical attention. Call ahead before visiting your clinic or emergency room to inform them of your symptoms and concern for COVID-19 infection. Once arrived, stay in the car with mask on, and ask the clinic or emergency room to call you on your cell phone when they are ready to see you. Do not use the waiting room in the clinic or hospital.

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