Three Honors College Students Score Goldwater Scholarships

Research/Academic Showcase

Hosam Attaya Hosam Attaya, molecular biology major, conducts research on the development of cotton fibers.

Three Texas Tech Honors College students, Hosam Attaya and Bobbak Mansouri of Lubbock and Suzanne McDonald of Allen have won Goldwater scholarships for the 2006-2007 academic year.

Attaya, a 19-year-old junior cell and molecular biology major, conducts research on the development of cotton fibers. He plans to pursue a doctorate in cell and molecular biology and genetics, possibly specializing in cancer biology and tumor physiology.

“My family was really proud again, because I'm now the second Goldwater Scholar of the family,” Attaya says. “My eldest brother was a Goldwater Scholar here at Texas Tech in 2002. He was the reason I decided that I should probably go for it as well. I feel as though I really accomplished something in my academic career.”

Bobbak Mansouri Bobbak Mansouri, molecular biology major, is researching the cognitive abilities of children as they pertain to the educational process.

Mansouri, 21, a junior cell and molecular biology major, hopes to pursue a doctorate in neurology/neurobiology and is researching the cognitive abilities of children as they pertain to the educational process.

Mansouri is studying in Cannes, France, this semester, and didn’t know he had won the scholarship until he called his father.

“I totally started yelling in this little telephone box that I was calling from. Luckily, no one was around so I didn't look completely nuts,” Mansouri says.

McDonald, a sophomore electrical engineering major, plans to pursue a doctorate in applied mathematics and astronautical engineering. The 20-year-old says she is interested in developing manned and unmanned probes to explore the solar system.

Suzanne McDonald Suzanne McDonald, electrical engineering major, is interested in developing manned and unmanned probes to explore the solar system.

“I think that I have always known that I was going to study something in either math or science,” she says. “I am going to use the money to finish paying for my tuition, room and board, and my books. I am planning on staying at Texas Tech to finish my bachelor’s and master’s degrees.”

About the Goldwater Program

The Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program, established by Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, was designed to provide opportunities for American undergraduate students with excellent academic records and outstanding potential.

Sophomores and Juniors who intend to pursue careers in mathematics, engineering or the natural sciences are eligible. Awards are made on the basis of merit and only 323 scholarships were awarded from a field of 1,081 applications during the 2006-2007 academic year. Each award covers tuition, fees, books, and room and board, up to a maximum of $7,500 per year for as many as two years. For more information visit the Goldwater Web site.