Business professor, Yitzhak Fried, examined how the fear of terrorism led to insomnia.

Fear of Terrorism Hastens Path to Burnout for Israeli Workers

Rawls College of Business professor, Yitzhak Fried, examined how the fear of terrorism led to insomnia.

Despite the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, and some subsequent smaller acts of terrorism on United States soil, most Americans have remained relatively safe and free from terrorism becoming part of their daily lives.

Not so throughout the Middle East, where suicide bombings and explosions from improvised explosive devices (IED) are much more common, sometimes happening on a daily basis.

Even for citizens completely disassociated with the military or fighting terrorists, the threat of terrorism becomes a real, tangible part of daily life, and its effects are wide-ranging. Professor Yitzhak Fried, a native of Israel who was recently named the area coordinator of management at the Texas Tech University Rawls College of Business, was part of a team that studied the link between fear of terror as a major factor in job burnout as manifested in emotional, physical and mental exhaustion among Israeli workers.

“Other studies before have focused more on the big events of terrorism like 9/11,” Fried said. “What we’ve done here is not focusing on that as much as looking at the ongoing experiences of terrorism. That is the type that will take a toll on you being under that stress all the time, and I think the results are very interesting.”

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