Electrical and Computer Engineering
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EE 4316 - Power Electronics

Designation

 

Elective

Catalog description

EE 4316: Power Electronics (3:3:0). Prerequisite: ECE 3323, ECE 3312, and ECE 3353. For majors only or departmental consent. Switch-mode power conversion, power supplies, inverters, motor drives, power semiconductor devices, and magnetics. System analysis, design, and modeling.

 

Prerequisite(s)

 

ECE 3323, ECE 3312, and ECE 3353

Textbook(s) and/or other required material

 

Mohan, Undeland, and Robbins, Power Electronics, John Wiley & Sons, 2003.

Course learning outcomes

Upon completion of this course students should be able to analyze and design power electronic systems using switching-mode power conditioning devices and motor drives.

 

Topics covered

Introduction of power electronics systems - 1 hour

Overview of power semiconductor switches - 2 hours

line-frequency diode rectifiers - 3 hours

line-frequency phase controlled converters - 4 hours

DC-DC switch mode converters - 4 hours

DC-AC switch mode converters - 4 hours

Switching DC power supplies - 3 hours

Power conditioners and UPS - 3 hours

DC motor drives - 4 hours

AC induction motor drives - 5 hours

HV-DC utility systems - 3 hours

Optimized utility interfaces - 2 hours

Tests and reviews - 4 hours

 

Class/laboratory schedule

Class meets 15 weeks, 3 times per week for 50 minutes or 2 times per week for 80 minutes.

 

Contributions to professional component

This course prepares students for engineering practice through detailed discussion of design and performance of power electronic circuits and their impact on the utilities supplying the primary power and the energy consumption of the loads. This course includes engineering topics and engineering design.

 

Relationship of course to program outcomes

 

This course addresses EE and CMPE Program Outcomes a, c, e, and k.

 

Prepared by

Michael Giesselmann, September 2004