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Ann R. Hawkins

Women Writers and the Artifacts of Celebrity in the Long Nineteenth Century. Ed. with Maura Ives. Ashgate, 2012.

Reviews

This immensely interesting and informative volume elegantly maps the ways in which women writers participated in celebrity culture through printed and visual artifacts. In offering  probing analyses of the sometimes vexed relationship between celebrity status and critical success for writers whose gender and popularity could occlude recognition of their aesthetic brilliance, this collection makes an essential contribution to our understanding of the literary history of women writers.' Harriet Kramer Linkin, New Mexico State University, USA ‘These essays show the close connections between the artifacts of celebrity and the discourses of celebrity, and the ways in which the two can meld together in a printed codex...The conjunction of gender, celebrity and material culture make this book essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the cultural history of literary celebrity in the nineteenth century’.

– Tom Mole, Review 19
Full Review]

 

Ann R. Hawkins

Romantic Women Writers Reviewed. Volume 6: 1791. Ed. Ann R. Hawkins. Pickering & Chatto, 2012.

Reviews

These volumes admirably fill a gap in our knowledge of how the work of Romantic women writers was received. [...] a splendid, albeit expensive, resource that should grace the shelf of every Romantic scholar.

– G. Todd Davis, Review 19
[Full Review]

Ann R. Hawkins

Romantic Women Writers Reviewed. Volume 5: 1790. Ed. Ann Hawkins. Pickering & Chatto, 2012.

Reviews

These volumes admirably fill a gap in our knowledge of how the work of Romantic women writers was received. [...] a splendid, albeit expensive, resource that should grace the shelf of every Romantic scholar.

– G. Todd Davis, Review 19
[Full Review]

Ann R. Hawkins

Romantic Women Writers Reviewed. Volume 4: 1790. Ed. Ann R. Hawkins. Pickering & Chatto, 2012.

Reviews

These volumes admirably fill a gap in our knowledge of how the work of Romantic women writers was received. [...] a splendid, albeit expensive, resource that should grace the shelf of every Romantic scholar.

– G. Todd Davis, Review 19
[Full Review]

Ann R. Hawkins

Romantic Women Writers Reviewed. Volume 1-3: 1790. Ed. Ann R. Hawkins. Pickering & Chatto, 2011.

Reviews

These volumes admirably fill a gap in our knowledge of how the work of Romantic women writers was received. [...] a splendid, albeit expensive, resource that should grace the shelf of every Romantic scholar.

– G. Todd Davis, Review 19
[Full Review]

Ann R. Hawkins

Conradiana: A Journal of Joseph Conrad Studies 38.1 (Spring 2006)-present. Issues of Conradiana, beginning with 38.1, are available via Project Muse.

Ann R. Hawkins

Teaching Bibliography, Book History and Textual Criticism. An edited collection. London: Pickering and Chatto, 2006.

Reviews

‘The collection of twenty-three articles … serves not so much as a comprehensive pedagogical guide as an eclectic and thought-provoking conversation. [...] Scholars and librarians going forward must find ways to incorporate book-historical concepts and skills more democratically. Teaching Bibliography sets us on that road.’
– Barbara A Brannon, SHARP News (2009)

'Ann R. Hawkins has compiled a highly readable and pedagogically sound collection of essays and resources for faculty teaching bibliography, book history, or literary criticism.'
– Libby Chenault, The Library Quarterly 78.3 (July 2008): 333-35.

'Required reading'
– Helen Vincent, The Rare Books Newsletter  (2007): 79.

'This book deserves to be on the shelves of anyone who faces the need to engage students with understanding of how the past has come down to us.'
– David McKitterick,  “In Brief: Bibliography” The Times Literary Supplement May 25 2007: p. 29.

'As a compilation of thoughtful, inventive, and highly readable entries, Teaching Bibliography, Textual Criticism, and Book History makes a valuable contribution to the discipline."
– Franklin Parks, The Eighteenth-century Intelligencer n.s. 21.2 (May 2007): 36-39.

Other reviews (all positive) include the following:

  • Hinks, John. Journal of the Printing Historical Society. (Summer 2008)
  • Alston, Robin. The Library. 8.3 (2007) 351-53.
  • Osborne, Roger. Script and Print: Bulletin of the Bibliographical Society of Australia & New Zealand. 30.3. (2006): 190-93.
  • Anderson, Kristine. Biblionotes. [a publication of the American Library Association] 50, (Fall 2007): 6-7.
  • Baker, William. Papers of the Bibliographical Society 101.2, June (2007): 233-34.

Ann R. Hawkins

Victims of Society (1837) by Marguerite Farmer Power Gardiner, Countess of Blessington, Vol. 4 in Silver Fork Novels, 1826-1841, London: Pickering and Chatto, 2005.

Review

'In making a select number of these novels available to contemporary readers, the Pickering & Chatto editors will help to ... register the extent to which an ostensible ephemeral literature may permanently alter the landscape of nineteenth century fiction.'

– Lauren Gillingham, Times Literary Supplement

Ann R. Hawkins

Venetia (1836) by Benjamin Disraeli, Vol. 6 in "The Early Novels of Benjamin Disraeli," London: Pickering and Chatto, 2004.

Review

‘These Pickering and Chatto editions are the first to collate all the different editions that appeared in Disraeli’s lifetime. They show what his twenty and thirty-year-old self had dared to put into print as well as what his forty-year-old self took out and tried to hush up. For four of the six novels, comparison of the different editions now be made for the first time. All six have detailed endnotes as well as new scholarly introductions, expertly placing the works in a hitherto uncertain literary territory somewhere between the Romantics and the heyday of Dickens.’

– William Kuhn, Times Literary Supplement

Ann R. Hawkins

Henrietta Temple (1837) by Benjamin Disraeli, Vol. 5 in "The Early Novels of Benjamin Disraeli," London: Pickering and Chatto, 2004.

Review

‘These Pickering and Chatto editions are the first to collate all the different editions that appeared in Disraeli’s lifetime. They show what his twenty and thirty-year-old self had dared to put into print as well as what his forty-year-old self took out and tried to hush up. For four of the six novels, comparison of the different editions now be made for the first time. All six have detailed endnotes as well as new scholarly introductions, expertly placing the works in a hitherto uncertain literary territory somewhere between the Romantics and the heyday of Dickens.’

– William Kuhn, Times Literary Supplement

Mary Jane Hurst

Language, Gender, and Community in Late Twentieth-Century Fiction: American Voices and American Identities. Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Mary Jane Hurst

The Voice of the Child in American Literature: Linguistic Approaches to Fictional Child Language.  Lexington: UP of Kentucky, 1990.

Mary Jane Hurst

HTLV-1 and the Nervous System.  Eds. Gustavo Roman, Jean-Claude Vernant, and Mitsuhiro Osame, Editors.  Mary Jane Hurst, Technical Editor.  New York: Alan R. Liss, 1989.