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Marta Kvande

Associate Professor

Ph.D. Delaware
Office: 432
Phone: (806) 834-6480
Email:marta.kvande@ttu.edu
Website:http://www.faculty.english.ttu.edu/kvande

Kvande specializes in eighteenth-century British literature, with particular interests in women writers, the history of the novel, narrative, the Gothic, and the history of the book.  She has published articles on Eliza Haywood, Jane Barker, and Delarivière Manley in SEL and The Eighteenth-Century Novel and has an article on Charlotte Lennox and theories of reading in the collection Masters of the Marketplace as well as an article on Jane Barker’s Exilius in the collection New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction.  Her article on Haywood, Richardson, and attitudes toward manuscript and print cultures is forthcoming in Eighteenth-Century Studies.  Her co-edited collection, Everyday Revolutions: Eighteenth Century Women Transforming Public and Private, is published by the University of Delaware Press.  She is currently working on a book project titled Negotiating Print and Manuscript in the Eighteenth-Century Novel.

Co-Edited Collection
Articles
Reviews
Other Publications
Work in Progress

Everyday revolutions: eighteenth-century women transforming public and private


Co-Edited Collection

  • Everyday Revolutions: Eighteenth-Century Women Transforming Public and Private. Ed. Diane E. Boyd and Marta Kvande. Newark, DE: U of Delaware P, 2008.

 

Articles

  • "The Removes of Harriot Stuart; or, Charlotte Lennox and the Birth of the Western." With Sara Spurgeon. Before the West Was West: Essays on Pre-1800 Western American Literature. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, forthcoming.
  • “Printed in a Book: Negotiating Print and Manuscript Cultures in Fantomina and Clarissa.” Eighteenth-Century Studies 46.2 (2013): 239-57.
  • “Jane Barker’s Exilius: Politics, Women, Narration, and the Public.” From “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”:Essays in Honor of Jerry C. Beasley. Ed. Christopher D. Johnson.  Newark, DE:  U of Delaware P, 2011. 127-143.
  • Reading Female Readers: The Female Quixote and Female Quixotism.” Masters of the Marketplace:  British Women Novelists of the 1750s. Ed. Susan Carlile. Bethlehem, PA: Lehigh UP. 2011. 219-41.
  • “Frances Burney and Frances Sheridan: Epistolary Fiction and the Public Sphere.” Everyday Revolutions: Eighteenth-Century Women Transforming Public and Private.  Ed. Diane E. Boyd and Marta Kvande.  Newark, DE: U of Delaware P, 2008.  159-187.
  • “Jane Barker and Delarivière Manley: Public Women Against the Public Sphere.” The Eighteenth-Century Novel 5 (2006):143-74.
  • “The Outsider Narrator in Eliza Haywood’s Political Novels.” Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 43 (2003): 625-43.

 

Reviews

  • Rev. of Women, Work, and Clothes in the Eighteenth-Century Novel, by Chloe Wigston-Smith. New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century 11.1 (2014): forthcoming.
  • Rev. of Revolution and the Antiquarian Book: Reshaping the Past, 1780-1815, by Kristian Jensen. Forthcoming in The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography.
  • Rev. of The Eighteenth-Century Novel vol. 8. New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century 10.1 (2013): 96-8.
  • Rev. of Reading Fictions, 1660-1740:  Deception in English Literary and Political Culture, by Kate Loveman. Reception: Texts, Readers, Audiences, History 3 (2011): 180-183. 
    Web. http://www.english.udel.edu/rsssite/Loveman.pdf
  • Rev. of The Seduction Narrative in Britain, 1747-1800, by Katherine Binhammer.  Forthcoming in The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography.
  • Rev. of The Eighteenth-Century Novel volumes 6-7. New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century 8.1 (2011): 95-6.
  • Rev. of America in the British Imagination, eds Catherine Armstrong, Roger Fagge, and Tim Lockley. The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 33 (2011): 507-8..
  • Rev. of A Political Biography of Delarivier Manley, by Rachel Carnell. The Scriblerian 43.2 (2011): 238-40.
  • Rev. of A Simple Story, by Elizabeth Inchbald, ed. Anna Lott.  The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 33 (2011): 568-9.
  • Rev. of Women Novelists and the Ethics of Desire, 1684-1814: In the Voice of Our Biblical Mothers, by Elizabeth Kraft. East-Central Intelligencer 24.1-2 (Feb. 2010): 29-32.
  • Rev. of The Vagabond: A Novel, by George Walker, ed. W. M. Verhoeven. The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 31 (2010): 530-531.
  • Rev. of The Infernal Quixote: A Tale of the Day, by Charles Lucas, ed. M. O. Grenby.  The Eighteenth Century:  A Current Bibliography 30 (2009): 530.
  • Rev. of Ingenuous Subjection: Compliance and Power in the Eighteenth-Century Domestic Novel, by Helen Thompson. Eighteenth-Century Studies 42.1 (2008): 179-81.
  • Rev. of Novel Relations: The Transformation of Kinship in English Literature and Culture, 1748-1818, by Ruth Perry.  The Eighteenth Century:  A Current Bibliography 30 (2009): 549-50.
  • Rev. of Sterne’s Whimsical Theatres of Language: Orality, Gesture, Literacy, by Alexis Tadié. The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 29 (2003): 558-9.
  • Rev. of Patriotism and Poetry in Eighteenth-Century Britain, by Dustin Griffin. The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 28 (2002): 564-5.
  • Rev. of Writing for the Rising Generation: British Fiction for Young People 1672-1839, by Sylvia Kasey Marks. East-Central Intelligencer 18.3 (2004): 25-6.
  • Rev. of The Young Philosopher, by Charlotte Smith, ed. Elizabeth Kraft. The Scriblerian 34 (2001-02): 102.

 

Other Publications

  • "Book Production." Encyclopedia of British Literature 1660-1789. Ed. Gary Day and Jack Lynch. Oxford: Wiley/Blackwell (forthcoming).   
  • Volume advisor for "Jane Barker." Literature Criticism 1400-1800. Ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau. Vol. 216. Detroit: Gale, 2013. 1-72.
  • Co-author, Study Guide for Technical Communication in the Global Community, 1 ed., by Deborah St C. Andrews.
    On-line:http://dev.prenhall.com/divisions/hss/app/andrews/

 

Work in Progress

  • Negotiating Print and Manuscript in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
    Book manuscript studying eighteenth-century novels’ representations of manuscripts and of print in the context of the period’s burgeoning print culture. Argues that eighteenth-century novels had to negotiate among the different kinds of authority attributed to manuscripts and to print in order to construct a new kind of authority for themselves; shows that the way these negotiations changed over the century forms an important part of the history of the novel and of print culture.  In progress.