Texas Tech University

Fall 2016 - 5000 Level Courses


  • Campus Map - the English/Philosophy building is #46, located in D1

ENGL 5060: History and Theory of Composition

Dr. Rebecca Rickly
MW 12:00-1:20 PM (ONST)
CRN: 15494

Description
Seminar in history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric studies. Required for all new teaching assistants and graduate part-time instructors.

Requirements fulfilled
Foundations

ENGL 5060: History and Theory of Composition

Dr. Rebecca Rickly
MW 2:00-3:20 PM (ONST)
CRN: 34680

Description
Seminar in history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric studies. Required for all new teaching assistants and graduate part-time instructors.

Requirements fulfilled
Foundations

ENGL 5301: Old English Language

Dr. Brian McFadden
MWF 12:00-12:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 33019

Description
This course will introduce students to the grammar, syntax, vocabulary, phonology, and morphology of Old English and examine its relationship to the language we speak today. Our primary focus will be to develop a basic reading knowledge of Old English for the study of introductory Old English prose and poetic texts, as well as preparing students to begin reading Beowulf in the Spring 2017 semester (this course is a prerequisite for Beowulf). We will also use the newly-online Electronic Beowulf manuscript images to introduce the basics of manuscript study.  Course requirements: daily translations; midterm exam, periodic quizzes, and one final translation/transcription project using the Electronic Beowulf website. Texts: Moore, Knott, and Hulbert, The Elements of Old English; Mitchell and Robinson, A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary; possibly a coursepack of supplemental materials (delivered via Dropbox); The Electronic Beowulf.

Requirements fulfilled
British Literature; High Proficiency language requirement, when combined with ENGL 5303 (Beowulf) and ENGL 5334 (History of the English Language); Medieval and Renaissance Studies Certificate eligible course

ENGL 5305: Studies in Shakespeare: Shakespeare in Context

Dr. Marliss Desens
Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 37202

Description
Shakespeare belonged to a vibrant, dynamic theatrical community. He was a student of the drama of his predecessors, an innovator keenly interested in the experiments of his contemporaries, and a theatrical inspiration to the dramatists who came after him. In this seminar, we will examine some of Shakespeare's plays in conjunction with those of such dramatists as John Lyly, Robert Greene, Christopher Marlowe, George Peele, Thomas Kyd, Ben Jonson, John Marston, George Chapman, and Thomas Heywood, Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, and the ever popular Anonymous. I will e-mail the syllabus to students in the course early in January, as the seminar meets for three hours one day a week, so we need to hit the ground running. For the first meeting, please read the assigned material. Please send your e-mail comments to me and the other seminar members by Wednesday noon (the day before the seminar meets). These comments will jumpstart our conversations about the plays.


Required Texts

  • The Norton Shakespeare, 2nd ed. [Note: If you own The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G. Blakemore Evans and J. J. M. Tobin, it is acceptable, as are Arden editions.)
  • English Renaissance Drama, ed. David Bevington, et. al.
  • Shakespeare and Contemporary Dramatists, ed. Ton Hoenselaars (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Electronic Texts available on-line through Texas Tech University Library
You may also use hard copies of plays not found in the anthologies. Our class is small, so there should be enough library copies available--either in anthologies or single texts--for seminar members to share. The best individual Shakespeare texts are the Arden third editions (or second, if third is not yet published). For the contemporary drama, the best texts are the Revels editions, although Arden has recently moved into non-Shakespearean drama as well. New Mermaids editions are usually acceptable The Nebraska series is long out of print but should be available in the library. Malone Society reprints are solid scholarly editions but do not have much by way of annotation.

Recommended Text
Reading Shakespeare's Dramatic Language: A Guide, ed. Sylvia Adamson, et. al. (Current publisher: Bloomsbury). This book is helpful in learning to understand the conventions of language and drama that Shakespeare and his contemporaries used. I particularly recommend it if you are new to Shakespeare, but advanced students will also find it enlightening.

Requirements fulfilled
British Literature; Medieval and Renaissance Studies Certificate eligible course

ENGL 5317: Postcolonial Literature: Imagining Cosmopolitanism from Postcolonial Locations

Dr. Roger McNamara
Thursdays 6:00-8:50 PM (HYBR)
CRN: 37200/37203

Description
Though the concept of cosmopolitanism originates in ancient Greece, it has become increasingly debated in our globalized world where national economies are dependent upon each other, where peoples and cultures are constantly circulating and being transformed, and where states that were unconcerned with each other have come into conflict. In our integrated world critics like Martha Nussbaum believe that cosmopolitanism is the only viable model that can promote social consensus and harmony. For others, such as Kwame Anthony Appiah, cosmopolitanism surreptitiously asserts normative values (typically associated with Europe) and suppresses differences. This course examines the debate over the relevance of cosmopolitanism through the lens of postcolonial theory and literature. How do artists and theorists of color and of different religious and ethnic backgrounds debate the relevance of cosmopolitanism? To this effect, we will be reading theorists like Kwame Anthony Appiah, Leela Gandhi, Walter Mignolo, and David Scott in conjunction with writers from the early twentieth century to the present like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigeria-US), Tsitsi Dangarembga (Zimbabwe), Amitav Ghosh (India), Michael Ondaatje (Canada-Sri Lanka), Rabindranath Tagore (India), and Pramoedya Ananta Toer (Indonesia).

Requirements fulfilled
Comparative Literature

ENGL 5323: Race and the Construction of National Identity in the Antebellum American Novel

Dr. Daniel de Paula Valentim Hutchins
Wednesdays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONLN)
CRN: 37201

Description

The main purpose of this seminar will be to (re)consider a wide assortment of antebellum 19th century American novels and to use them as a way to help us think through questions surrounding the formation of a U.S. national identity. We will investigate how this identity has always contended, sometimes violently, with the ineluctable cosmopolitanism of American populations and the conflicted inclusiveness of the American imaginary. We will pay special attention to the development of race as a critical category before the Civil War and its relationship to changing ideas of national identity and international solidarity.

Requirements fulfilled

American Literature; LSJE

ENGL 5324: Twentieth Century American Literature: West of Everything

Dr. Sara Spurgeon
Thursdays 9:30-12:30 PM (ONST)
CRN: 33021

Description
We will examine works of fiction and film that have helped to establish and to challenge the genre of the Western. Some will be classics (both literary and filmic) and some will undermine, subvert, or expand our ideas about what Westerns are, what they mean, and what they do. We will explore these texts from a number of different angles: What did the myth of the frontier look like in the past and what shape is it assuming in literature and film today? How has it been used to justify or deconstruct American ideas about conquest, colonization, and empire? How might it work to define contemporary ideas about gender, race, class, sexuality, national identity, and borders? How does the work of non-Anglos writing and filming from "the other side" of the frontier reinterpret that myth? We will be doing close readings of novels, films, and theory.

Requirements fulfilled
American Literature; Film and Media Studies; LSJE

ENGL 5327: Studies in Multicultural Literature: Border Wars: From Corridos to Narcos

Dr. Cordelia Barrera
Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 34395

Description
In this course, we take the U.S.-Mexico borderlands as a point of departure for examining its historical, political, and cultural construction. In discussing borderlands literary productions, we will examine the landscape, historical and contemporary conflicts, and nationalizing efforts at the border, as well as more abstract ideas that include the border as strategy for cultural representation and the forging of hybrid identities. Questions we will consider include: What are borders and borderlands? How do borders change over time and what impact do these changes have on border dwellers in a postnationalist America? How are border immigrants and exiles imagined, constructed, and exploited by individuals, governments, and corporations? How do citizens of the borderlands resist injustice and violence? In exploring these questions, we will consider various cultural and literary approaches—including ecocritical and postcolonial theories, transnationalism, mestizaje, feminist critiques, social justice, and globalization. Our analysis of the borderlands will draw from various interdisciplinary sources including history, ethnography, literary productions, and film.

Texts
With a Pistol in His Hand by Américo Paredes, Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa, Caballero by Jovita González and Eve Raleigh, Under the Feet of Jesus by Maria Helena Viramontes, Down the Rabbit Hole by Juan Pablo Villalobos, Beauty Salon by Mario Bellatin. Additional readings by Emma Pérez, Chela Sandoval, Devon Peña, Homi Bhabha and Mary Pat Brady. Films/Shows include: Touch of Evil, Sleep Dealer, Maquilopolis and Narcos.

Assignments
Leading formal discussions; Conference-length paper; article-length paper; book or film review; oral presentation of conference-length paper.

Requirements fulfilled
American Literature; Non-Fiction

ENGL 5337: Studies in Linguistics (Language Typology)

Dr. Min-Joo Kim
Thursdays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONLN)
CRN: 37205

Description

This course is an introduction to language typology and linguistic universals. Questions to be addressed include but will not be limited to:

(a)  How are languages of the world different from and similar to each other? For example, are unrelated languages like English, Japanese, Arabic, Hindi, Quechua, and Navajo really just different ways of speaking the same language?

(b)  What are the factors that shape up the syntactic structures of languages in the world? For example, does geographic proximity to another language influence the structure of a language? And are there certain structural properties that hold regardless of geographical factors?

(c)   Do structural differences between languages impact how speakers of different languages package information? For instance, are verb-initial word order languages more efficient than verb-final languages in terms of conveying information?

In this course, students will be introduced to both a macro-level and a micro-level analysis of languages in the world.

Requirements fulfilled
Graduate Certificate in Linguistics; Methods

ENGL 5340: Research Methods

Dr. Julie Nelson Couch
Wednesdays 9:00 AM-11:50 AM (ONST)
CRN: 35475

Description
This course is an introduction to the methods, processes, and procedures for graduate-level (MA and PhD) research in English, for students pursuing MA and PhD degrees in English with concentrations primarily in Literature, Linguistics, and Creative Writing. Students will investigate the uses of archival, bibliographic, and web-based sources in graduate-level scholarship. Literary criticism and textual scholarship are two routes professional readers take in presenting, interpreting, and teaching works of literature.

In this course, we will posit textual scholarship—a discipline that encompasses bibliography, editing, and reception—as foundational to literary research. We will briefly explore its theories and practices: combining theoretical discussion of textual matters—such as the nature of texts, authorship, readership, and translation—with practical skills in research and bibliography.

Requirements fulfilled

Foundations

ENGL 5341: History and Theories of the Book

Dr. Jennifer Snead
Mondays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONLN)
CRN: 37204

Description
This course focuses on the relationships between texts and their material embodiments, from stone to screen, papyrus to paper, codex to Kindle, taking as its guiding principle that understanding the social and material construction of texts, and the circumstances of their physical dissemination, is crucial to understanding literary works and their reception. The scope of the course is broad, beginning with an overview of material text production across history and cultures, examining early writing and publishing technologies. We'll move through the transition from scribal to print cultures and the hand press period, through the nineteenth-century industrialization of print, and end with digital texts and the medium of screen and internet.

Along the way we will consider how a series of contemporary theoretical issues inform or are informed by our examination of material texts: authorship and ownership (copyright); the role of the book in the state; the role of editors, publishers, and readers in the creation of textual meaning; the ways in which ideas are translated into things.

Requirements fulfilled
Graduate Certificate in Book History and Digital Humanities; Non-fiction

ENGL 5342: Critical Methods: Cultural/Literacy Theories/Readings

Dr. Scott Baugh
Tuesdays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 18812

Description
“Critical Methods” is a graduate seminar designed to survey a range of approaches to reading texts critically. Bring in theory, some naively assume, and you lose the magic of reading; however, it is always already there, and we may gain from being fully aware of our own discursive approaches to reading texts, our critical methods, and articulating them as such, methodologies. We will explore recognized ‘schools' of criticism predominant over the last four decades or so, but we will place emphasis on significant patterns within and among these schools. As a result, we will be able to return to our scholarship in a more serious, more conscious, and more professional way. We will begin, as did Terry Eagleton, with the question, what is literature? We will move, as did Roland Barthes, from work to text. Like Judith Butler, we will inscribe bodies that matter. Mirroring Slavoj Zizek, we may look awry and, following Bakhtin, avoid utter inadequacies. Rather than bound ourselves into a single anthology, an online reserve of readings will include some tried pieces for a course such as this—by Paul de Man, Stanley Fish, Julia Kristeva, Walter Benjamin, Jonathan Culler, Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Manthia Diawara, among others—as well some less-tested ones like Joanna Russ' How to Suppress Women's Writing, Jesús Salvador Treviño's “Thirty Years of Struggle,” articles from Wired magazine, and others as they fit.

As a group, we will cross the range of critical methods, but individually participants will be encouraged to devise particularly relevant projects that facilitate larger research agendas and professional interests. Moreover, as you discover ‘schools' most useful to your own research, then you will have the opportunity to read backward and through earlier influences on that school, potentially exploring pools of information across a number of disciplines including philosophy, history and historiography, sociology, psychology, physics, among others.

Formal requirements: assigned readings & several in-class ‘teaching demo' presentations; one short (5-7 pp.) research essay; one class research presentation; and one article-length (15+ pp.) essay. A course-long ‘journal' will be due as a final exam; it's also likely we will take advantage of some online discussions in Blackboard.

Requirements fulfilled
Foundations

ENGL 5342: Critical Methods

Dr. Jen Shelton
Tuesdays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONLN)
CRN: 33345

Description
This course will address major theoretical movements of the late 20th and early 21st century in order to give students tools to use in reading and writing literary criticism. The course will contextualize theory in terms of questions readers and writers frequently debate (such as intention, rhetoric, and so on) and will feature hands-on work with major theorists, focusing on post-structuralists. Students should not expect to emerge from this class with a publishable seminar paper. Instead, the class, strongly pragmatic in nature, will feature a series of short assignments intended to help you both understand theory as promulgated by others and do theory of your own.

Requirements fulfilled
Foundations

ENGL 5351: Studies in Film and Literature: Go Big or Go Away: Media Transformation in the Late Nineteenth Century

Dr. Wyatt Phillips
Tuesdays 9:00-11:50 AM (ONST)
CRN: 15008

Description
The rise of visual culture. The emergence of urban modernity. New technologies for recording and reproducing. The United States in the late nineteenth century was privy to a number of overlapping changes that radically affected the trajectory of media and shaped the forms and genres that came to dominate twentieth-century mass culture. This course will consider and then expand upon these historical contexts through an extended examination of the economic landscape of this period and the impact it had on the origins of mass media at the turn of the last century (19th to 20th). What effect did new business strategies and economic imperatives have on the type of cultural products that proliferated at the time and that persisted into the new century? What media practices and, in fact, media forms faded in importance and what emerged to take their place? In seeking answers to these questions, we will study the emergence of new media such as cinema and recorded sound as well as the concomitant transformation of older print forms including books, newspapers, and magazines.

Texts
Primary texts will include at least selections of early films and early recorded sound (1895-1910); series fiction (e.g., Beadles and Adams, Stratemeyer Syndicate); serialized fiction and story papers (e.g., New York Ledger, Atlantic Monthly), Hearst/Pulitzer newspapers; and trade journals (Publisher's Weekly, Moving Picture World). These will be supplemented with medium specific histories of development/transformation in this period; histories of the broader cultural and industrial transformations in America in the 19th century; new media theory; and related later cultural critics such as the Frankfurt School.

Course Requirement
One short (5pp) midterm essay and a research project resulting in an annotated bibliography, an oral presentation, and an article-length paper. For the research project, students are free to consider work from outside our period and region so long as the analytical methods of political economic contextualization and intermediality that the course presents shape and inform the research and writing.

Requirements fulfilled
Film and Media Studies; Book History and Digital Humanities Certificate; American Literature

ENGL 5370: Poetry: Graduate Poetry Workshop

Dr. John Poch
Mondays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 15196

Description
In this class, in addition to writing poems each week, we will be reading contemporary and modern poetry (verse, criticism, and theory). Classes will be discussion and critique oriented. Recitation of a poem is a requirement. A final portfolio of poems with a statement of aesthetics is due at semester's end.

Requirements fulfilled
Poetry

ENGL 5370: Fiction Workshop

Dr. Dennis Covington
Wednesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 33026

Description
TBA

ENGL 5370: Nonfiction Workshop

Dr. Jill Patterson
Mondays 6:00-8:50 PM (ONST)
CRN 15198

Description
In this writing workshop, we will study the various forms of creative nonfiction and all of the ethical concerns that lie behind writing nonfiction. In particular, we'll consider how narrative nonfiction participates in and changes the larger conversation about the social justice issues most important today—how does one translate experience and research into engaging stories that persuade? We will read several books as well as individual essays in order to study the types of scaffolding available to nonfiction writers: the lyric, metanarrative, flash, experimental, short documentary films, video essays, and multimedia essays. Each student will write three essays and create one video essay. Revision and submission to literary journals will comprise a large portion of the final course grade. Texts (I will narrow this down to four or five): A Cup of Water Under My Bed by Daisy Hernandez; Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson; The Other Side by Lacy Johnson; Citizen by Claudia Rankine; Bluets by Maggie Nelson; A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah; When Women Were Birds: Fifty-Four Variations on Voice by Terry Tempest Williams.

Requirements fulfilled
Non-Fiction

ENGL 5380: Advanced Problems in Literature: Chapbook and Broadside Publishing

Dr. Curtis Bauer
Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN: 33027

Description
In this course, students will examine the history of the small book (otherwise known as Chapter Book, or in its more contemporary setting, the Chapbook) and broadsides in America, beginning with those published in the early 19th century and ending with the most contemporary ones being published today. We'll see how chapbooks and broadsides have changed, for better or for worse, and what the future might hold for such literary outlets. Additionally, students will learn the business of editing and publishing a chapbook and broadside: each student will create his or her own small press, design a logo, establish a mission statement, formulate rejection and acceptance letters, select a manuscript of appropriate length for a chapbook and broadside, and, most importantly, learn how to typeset (using Adobe InDesign AND materials in the LetterPress Studio), how to copy edit (using MLA, Chicago, and AP stylesheets), and how to print using various technologies (a range of presses in the TTU LetterPress Studio as well as laser printers and photocopy machines).

By the end of the semester, students will have produced one chapbook and broadside for their small press. Students will be encouraged to not only hand bind their chapbook, but also to work with the print department and the letterpress lab to design and print a letterpress cover and/or broadside.

Requirements fulfilled
Non-fiction; Graduate Certificate in Publishing and Editing

ENGL 5380: Advanced Problems in Literature: Transnational Feminist and Queer Studies

Dr. Kanika Batra
Fridays 9:00-11:50 AM (HYBR)
CRN 15357/37206

Description
Chandra Mohanty's conceptualization of feminism without borders is premised on intersections between women's movements, activism, and analysis on a global scale. As a method of inquiry encompassing biological, kinship, and work-related categories that span cultures and continents -- women as unwaged, white, blue, or pink collar workers performing corporate, academic, manual, domestic, or sexual labor -- transnational feminist studies has emerged as an important branch of globalization theory. Following Nancy Fraser, we can identify struggles for recognition of new identity categories and redistribution of economic, social, and political power as the major strands in transnational feminist analysis.

'Redistribution' and 'recognition' are keywords in the feminist philosophical, anthropological, and historical accounts we will read in this course. Some of the issues the course will address are: emergence of new categories of work such as 'higglers' and ‘migrant sex workers' in the Caribbean; transnationalization of labor practices such as those in the export processing zones all over the world; women's responses to their changing public and private roles including an increase in domestic and social violence; new forms of affective intimacy in late capitalism including the adoption of a global vocabulary of identity politics such as 'gay', 'lesbian' or 'queer,' and the intersection of these identities with practices of tourism and migration. While we will examine these issues in a transnational framework, the course includes a special focus on the political, social, and cultural economies of the global South as manifested in gender studies scholarship and curricula in the Euro-American academy.

Requirements fulfilled
Comparative Literature; Non-fiction; Methods; Women's Studies Graduate Certificate

ENGL 5390: Writing for Publication

Dr. Marta Kvande
Wednesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN 15389

Description
This is a pragmatic course focusing on the process of preparing an essay for submission to a peer-reviewed journal and on professional activity more broadly. Students must begin the course with a previously-prepared article-length critical paper (5,000 to 7,000 words), usually one from a previous graduate course. Revising this essay for publication (including peer workshops and other revision practices) will be one of the major projects of the course. In addition, students will also learn and practice other aspects of the scholarly process, such as preparing and presenting conference-length papers, determining appropriate venues for their work (both conferences and journals), composing cover letters, applying for grants, writing book proposals, and writing book reviews, among other scholarly genres and conventions. As they learn more about the process of professionalization, students will also develop research agendas to help encourage their professional success.

Requirements fulfilled
Professional Development

ENGL 5390: Writing for Publication: Creative Writing Emphasis

Dr. Jacqueline Kolosov
Wednesdays 2:00-4:50 PM (ONST)
CRN 15391

Description
In this course, graduate students in creative writing will focus on preparing and submitting manuscripts to professional journals, agents, and publishers in their genres. It is therefore imperative that writers come into the course with a body of work in progress in a particular genre or in a hybrid genre. Writers who work in multiple genres must choose one genre on which to focus. Over the course of the semester, writers will revise and refine a body of existing creative work for submission. The specifics here will be determined by the student writer and his or her faculty mentor. (For the MA, the mentor is the portfolio chair. For the PhD, the mentor is the director of a member of the committee.)

Alongside honing a body of creative work-in-progress, writers will write a craft essay, a book review, an interview, and relevant query letters to publishers, agents, and other professionals in the literary marketplace. Essentially, Writing for Publication is designed to enable writers to develop the skills and savvy needed to navigate the contemporary literary publishing landscape.

Requirements fulfilled
Professional Development

Program links

Helpful links

Contact

Dr. Kanika Batra
Director / Advisor
Graduate Studies in Literature, Creative Writing and Linguistics
ENG/PHIL Rm. 206
806.834.8984

About the area

picture of campus

Lubbock is the "Hub City" of west Texas, eastern New Mexico and western Oklahoma--the center of commerce and culture for a giant swath of the sunny southwest.

  • 263 days of sun each year
  • Altitude: 3,000 feet
  • Average high temp: 80.1º F
  • Average low temp: 52.3º F
  • Population: 220,000