Texas Tech University

Graduate Seminars - Fall 2007

5060.001 History and Theories of College Composition

Rich Rice
MW 12:30-1:50

English 5060 provides an introduction to the history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric studies. The course begins from the premise that good teachers are reflective teachers, and good teachers of writing are reflective teachers of writing. Students examine and reflect on the development of the field of composition over the last 40 years, focusing on seminal articles that represent the discipline. Students study readings about integrating basic writing, service-learning, online writing, revision, research writing, proofreading and editing, portfolios, and assessment rubrics within the context of composition in general and TTU's composition program specifically. And just as the field of composition integrates new media tools in its construction, presentation, and assessment, so too will students in this course.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Foundations.

5060.002 History and Theories of College Composition

Rebecca Rickly
TR 3:30-4:50

English 5060 provides an introduction to the history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric studies. The course begins from the premise that good teachers are reflective teachers, and good teachers of writing are reflective teachers of writing. Students examine and reflect on the development of the field of composition over the last 40 years, focusing on seminal articles that represent the discipline. Students study readings about integrating basic writing, service-learning, online writing, revision, research writing, proofreading and editing, portfolios, and assessment rubrics within the context of composition in general and TTU's composition program specifically. And just as the field of composition integrates new media tools in its construction, presentation, and assessment, so too will students in this course.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Foundations.

5067.001 Methods of Teaching College Composition

Rich Rice
MW 2:00-3:20

ENGL 5067 focuses on methods of teaching college composition. Students discuss class observations and interactions in courses they themselves are teaching or preparing to teach. Students discuss document instruction practices, and reflect on and present over teaching experiences and readings about teaching composition in their weblogs, in formal essay writing, and in reflective multimodal writing. If teaching composition for the first time, especially, this course is an excellent support tool.
*This course is required (at least 1 credit) for all 2nd-year MA students holding a TA or GPTI position.

5303.001 Studies in Medieval British Literature

Brian McFadden
F 9:00-11:50

Beowulf
This course will be an in-depth translation and analysis of the first major epic poem in the English language. Topics to be discussed: Germanic social structure as depicted in the poem versus the realities of Anglo-Saxon society; the role of women in the poem and women in Anglo-Saxon society; the tension and accommodation between Christian and Germanic elements in the poem; the Anglo-Saxon conception of monstrousness; the paleography and codicology of the text. Prerequisite: ENGL 5301 (Old English Language). Requirements: one 15-20 page seminar paper; daily translation and reading.
*This course satisfies the requirement in pre-1700 British literature and Genre: Poetry.

5313.001 Studies in 20th-Century British Literature

Bruce Clarke
M 6:00-8:50

British Modernist Novels
We will start with Steven Matthews' Modernism for a look at the modernist period in the context of concurrent British and American social and cultural history. We will review salient concepts of narrative theory for an analytical vocabulary adequate to modernist literary innovations in prose fiction. The readings are drawn from the 1910s and '20s, when modernist experimentalism is consolidated directly in the face of Great Britain's involvement in World War I and its social and imperial aftermaths. Works covered: D. H. Lawrence, The Rainbow and Women in Love; Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier; Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier; Katherine Mansfield, The Garden Party and Other Stories; E. M. Forster, A Passage to India; and Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway. Classes will be in seminar discussion format. Students will give several formal class reports and write two critical essays.
*This course satisfies the requirement in post-1700 British literature and Genre: Fiction.

5323.001 Studies in 19th-Century American Literature

John Samson
TR 2:00-3:20

Realism in the Novel
The course will focus on realism, the dominant literary movement in the last half of the nineteenth century, and its expression in novels of the period. We will begin with an overview of the cultural and ideological forces that contributed to the rise of realism; then we will read and discuss a range of novels from 1849 to 1899. The novels focus upon the main issues of the period, social class and gender, but also are concerned with political corruption, immigration, race, and capitalism. Students will write two shorter (5-7 pp.), interpretive papers, a longer (12-15 pp.), research paper, and a final exam. Texts: Alan Trachtenberg, The Incorporation of America; Herman Melville, Redburn; Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall; Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Henry Adams, Democracy; John Hay, The Bread-winners; William Dean Howells, A Hazard of New Fortunes; Sarah Orne Jewett, Country of the Pointed Firs; Harold Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware; and Kate Chopin, The Awakening.
*This course satisfies the requirement in pre-1900 American literature and Genre: Fiction.

5324.001 Studies in 20th-Century American Literature

Bryce Conrad
TR 11:00-12:20

American Modernism
This course is devoted to examining American modernism from multiple perspectives. While studying several key literary texts of the period, we will investigate other modernist forms of expression, such as architecture, music, painting, photography, and film. Rather than giving a prescriptive definition of modernism that isolates literature from the rich ferment of American art in the opening decades of the twentieth century, we will seek an integrated though not totalizing picture of the aesthetic, social, cultural, economic, and historical forces that animated modernism.
Requirements include two exploratory essays, an oral presentation, a research paper, and a final examination. Writers to be covered will most likely include Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, John Dos Passos, Hart Crane, Djuna Barnes, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Zora Neale Hurston, Ernest Hemingway, and Wallace Stevens.
*This course satisfies the requirement in post-1900 American literature.

5337.001 Studies in Linguistics

Mary Jane Hurst
TR 12:30-1:50

Language and Gender
Our main goals in English 5337 will be to learn at a graduate level some basics of language study, to explore the relationship between gender and language, to examine competing theories about language and gender, and, overall, to understand the context of gender studies from the perspective of linguistics. Aside from some introductory background lectures, the first three-fourths or so of the semester will be arranged around discussions of specified readings. The last part of the semester will be devoted to student presentations applying course concepts in the analysis of specific texts. For details about how this class has been taught in a previous semester, visit the course information section of Dr. Hurst's website (www.faculty.english.ttu.edu/hurst). This course would be appropriate for students in any subfield or combination of subfields in English (linguistics, literature, technical communication, rhetoric, film, creative writing, etc.) as well students with interests in language and/or gender from programs outside English (CMLL, Psychology, Anthropology, Education, HDFS, etc.). The books for Fall 2007's English 5337 have not been selected as of 1/19/07.
*This course satisfies the Linguistics requirement in sociolinguistics.

5340.001 Research Methods

Ann Hawkins
T 6:00-8:50

This course prepares students to undertake research on the graduate level. Students will gain a thorough grounding in using library resources and in applying bibliographic theory. Students will undertake intensive literary research, creating enumerative and annotative bibliographies, and writing a textual history and/or research guide for their topic. Students will consider the technological aspect of books by analyzing their physical characteristics (binding, cover, printing, font, impression, etc) as well as their nature as socially constructed material objects. Students should expect to complete a variety of practical skills-building exercises in analytical and descriptive bibliography and in textual editing (including a project in TEI-coding for electronic editions). Note: This is not a course in literary analysis or literary criticism, but in the historical, cultural and technological contexts of books, contexts which are essential to any understanding of a literary work.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Foundations.

5340.001 Research Methods

Ann Hawkins
T 6:00-8:50

This course prepares students to undertake research on the graduate level. Students will gain a thorough grounding in using library resources and in applying bibliographic theory. Students will undertake intensive literary research, creating enumerative and annotative bibliographies, and writing a textual history and/or research guide for their topic. Students will consider the technological aspect of books by analyzing their physical characteristics (binding, cover, printing, font, impression, etc) as well as their nature as socially constructed material objects. Students should expect to complete a variety of practical skills-building exercises in analytical and descriptive bibliography and in textual editing (including a project in TEI-coding for electronic editions). Note: This is not a course in literary analysis or literary criticism, but in the historical, cultural and technological contexts of books, contexts which are essential to any understanding of a literary work.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Foundations.

5342.001 Critical Methods

James Whitlark
W 6:00-8:50

What makes Critical Methods absolutely essential is that whatever you write about literature derives from some literary theory. The problem is that unless you know which theory and how it works (as well as the present state of scholarship in it), you may sound out of date or even self-contradictory. Furthermore, theories are like lenses: looking at a text through one or more may help you discover interesting and valuable insights that are potentially publishable. These metaphoric lenses fit together as physical lenses do in a microscope or telescope. Consequently, the class will focus on the basic patterns that underlie the theories and fit the theories together. Assignments: midterm, term paper, and final examination
*This course satisfies the requirement in Foundations.

5350.001 Studies in Drama

Constance Kuriyama
R 2:00-4:50

Comedy
As Northrop Frye observes in Anatomy of Criticism, comedy, though notoriously resistant to theoretical reduction and analysis, is remarkably constant in its elemental form and content. Comedy crosses both temporal and cultural divides, and flourishes in diverse media with only minor modifications. In this course we will trace major elements of Western dramatic comedy, both verbal and visual, through a succession of representative works, beginning with Aristophanes and concluding with the shift of comedy's primary locus from the stage to film in the twentieth century. Readings will include plays by Shakespeare, Jonson, Molière, Wilde, and Shaw, as well as selections in theory of comedy. Screenings will begin with silent film comedy, and end with a film made in the last decade. Some screenings may be scheduled in addition to regular class meetings.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Genre: Drama.

5351.001 Studies in Film

Michael Schoenecke
T 6:00-8:50

The Auteurist Approach: Analysis of Filmmakers and Their Films
Auteur criticism is located at a midpoint on the criticism spectrum bound by textual criticism and contextual criticism. On the one hand, the auteurist critic is primarily engaged in identifying formal and rhetorical patterns in single films (individual texts), in discovering and describing cinematic structures and personal visions that are consistent from film to film in the work of a single film artist. On the other hand, auteurism is connected to the extratextual (contextual) consideration of film as an intersection of social and personal history, through questions of authorship, artistic influence, and biography. Auteur critics seek to characterize and illuminate the style of a single artist through a consideration of formal elements and the recurring attitudes and ideas expressed through plot, character, and theme, but they also draw a description and interpretation of the forces, both personal and public, that surround the production of the films under consideration.
Each week a different filmmaker will be addressed. Students will be required to few several films outside of class. Filmmakers to be addressed include Frank Capra, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Alfred Hitchcock, and others.
*This course satisfies the requirement in post-1900 American literature and Genre: Drama.

5352.001 Studies in Fiction

Ann Daghistany Ransdell
M 9:00-11:50

Gender, Race, Class and the Victorian Novel
English 5352, "Studies in Fiction," is a comparative literature course that may be arranged in various ways. This fall the students will read the English Victorian Novel, in order to compare the treatment of issues dealing with race, gender, and class. Students will understand in greater depth the origin of American social attitudes in the Victorian period. History and criticism of the period will be utilized. Specific attention will be paid to the Victorian concepts of education, and institutions such as the boarding school and the workhouse will be compared as microcosms of social policy. The impact of gender and class attitudes upon learning will be highlighted. Contemporary films of three novels that we read will be shown in the class to provide a novel/film comparison of character and theme. There will be three short papers, a long paper, an oral presentation of that long paper, and a final. We will read the following texts: Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist;Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Charlotte Brontë, Villette; Charlotte Brontë, The Professor; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; and George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss.
*This course satisfies the requirement in post-1700 British literature and Genre: Fiction.

5370.001 Studies in Creative Writing

Jill Patterson
M 6:00-8:50

Fiction
In this course, students will study contemporary short story cycles and novels told in stories. We'll take a look at the different techniques behind narrating novels and/or large, over-arching stories in small increments: shifting viewpoints, elliptical and parallel plotlines, recurring motifs, fragmented time, etc. We'll read five books: Susan Vreeland's Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, Julia Alvarez's ¡Yo!, Lee Martin's The Bright Forever, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, and a possible predecessor, Jean Toomer's Cane. We may even look at how filmmakers are using the form in feature films, perhaps Crash or Babel. Students will write brief, informal response papers to the reading assignments, but the majority of the class will be spent on original work: Students will write at least six chapters (no less than 120 pages) toward the completion of a novel or cycle. Students will submit individual chapters/stories (which should stand on their own) for publication in literary journals, and they will also prepare a query letter and proposal for the entire manuscript. Submission of manuscripts for publication will comprise a substantial portion of the student's grade. Some classes will take place online in a virtual classroom: stay at home, wear pajamas, and eat pizza while we meet!

5370.002 Studies in Creative Writing

John Poch
T 2:00-4:50

Poetry
Instruction in the invention and techniques of poetry writing, including revision. Students will be expected to work in traditional forms as well as free verse. The final grade is largely based on a portfolio of poems. In this class, in addition to writing poems each week, we will be reading contemporary and modern poetry (along with some criticism and theory). Classes will be discussion-oriented, although lectures are possible. Recitation of a poem is a requirement. Consistent class participation is a requirement. A final portfolio of poems is due at semester's end. A variety of poems and styles are appreciated and welcome.

5370.003 Studies in Creative Writing

Dennis Covington
T 6:00-8:50

Nonfiction
This is an advanced workshop in the writing of creative nonfiction, or "literary journalism," a genre Ronald Weber calls "fact writing based on reporting that frequently employs techniques drawn from the art of fiction to create something of fiction's atmosphere or feeling, and that most important, moves toward the intentions of fiction while remaining fully factual." Students will write at least three article-length pieces in this genre. Minimum word length will vary, according to assignments, from 1,500-3,000 words. The required texts will be Salvador, by Joan Didion, and Stiff, by Mary Roach.

5390.001 Writing for Publication

Scott Baugh
T 6:00-8:50

The self-evident goal of this seminar is to provide structure and support for writer-scholars to prepare their writing for publication. Practical activities—writing workshops, conference-style presentations, guideline and procedural overviews, etc.—aim at this primary goal of preparing a manuscript for submission. Further, a range of writing exercises, time-management tools, and resources will aid writer-scholars to maintain writing-for-publication habits and scholarly development. A greater aim of this seminar, however, focuses on examining the current role of publishing in our discipline and a range of styles of scholarship available to graduate students in the humanities. With these contexts in mind, each seminar participant will customize a research agenda, contemplate the role of publishing in her or his own course of professional development, and strive toward refining a professional profile.
The Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.) and The MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd ed.) will function as invaluable references for matters of style and convention and as essential guides for scholarly activity. A course reader will cover a range of supplementary topics, most likely including Ernest Boyer and Lee Shulman on scholarship of teaching; James Hoge and Robert Patten on scholarly reviews; MLA reports and Profession articles on evaluation of scholarship within the academy; Philip Lewis, Jennifer Crewe, and Gerald Graff on research institutions and publishing/perishing “crises”; Richard Abel on press infrastructures; William Strong, Peter Givler, and Susan Hockey on new media and rights; etc.
Assignments will include a publishable article (12+ pages); a conference-style presentation (12 minutes); a publishable book review or review essay (2-5 pages); a survey-of-scholarship report (7+ pages); and a resources report (open format). In addition to traditional seminar activities and discussions, some required participation will take advantage of a designated wiki.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Professional Development.

5390.002 Writing for Publication

Sara Spurgeon
W 9:00-11:50

This required course in professional development introduces graduate students to conventions of scholarly publication. Your work for this course will be based largely upon work you have done for prior courses in your primary area(s) of interest. You will have the opportunity to revise and expand a prior seminar paper for publication. In addition, we will discuss calls for papers, submission guidelines for journals, query letters to editors and conference organizers, the peer-review process, and other topics. In addition to preparing a journal-length version of a research project, students will write and submit other kinds of documents: a cover letter, an abstract, a conference-length paper, and a book review or encyclopedia entry. These are the genres for which academics typically write. We will wrap up the semester with a mini-conference.
*This course satisfies the requirement in Professional Development.