Texas Tech University

Graduate Seminars - Fall 2011

ENGL 5309-001 | Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature
From Orphans to Ideology: Charles Dickens and the Meanings of Trauma

Dr. Sean Grass
Thursday 2:00-4:50 PM
Requirements filled: Post-1700 British period requirement; Fiction genre requirement.

Seminar Canceled

ENGL 5313-001 | Studies in Modern and Contemporary British Literature
The Later Lawrence's Cosmos

Dr. Bruce Clarke
Tuesday 2:00-4:50 PM

Requirements filled: Post-1700 British period requirement

This seminar will focus on the second decade of D. H. Lawrence's writings, in their own right, and in the context of several other notable authors of the period. Lawrence lived in New and Old Mexico (Taos, Oaxaca) off and on between 1922-25, and we will look especially at a number of texts that seize these neighboring landscapes. This writing is intense, problematic, and fascinating. The encounter with America opened up in Lawrence a vein of cultural fantasy to which a certain phantasmatic strain in later 1920's British fiction may be compared. And compared with Orlando, First and Last Men, and Brave New World, Lady Chatterley's Lover is positively down-to-earth. Perhaps that was the point. The case of Aldous Huxley is intriguing as well: he presents a positive portrait of Lawrence in Point Counter Point, but then, a few years later, rips into Lawrence's vision of native America to lace Brave New World with bitter satire. We will read some selections of criticism around these authors, related to questions of science, technology, and science fiction, posthumanism and animal studies. But for the most part, the seminar's approach will be non-sectarian and head-on. Classes will be in seminar discussion format. Students will give several formal class reports and write two critical essays.

Readings: D. H. Lawrence, Selected Poetry; Women in Love (1920); Mornings in Mexico (1924); The Woman Who Rode Away, St. Mawr, The Princess (1925); The Plumed Serpent (1925); Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928) ; Virginia Woolf, Orlando (1928); Olaf Stapledon, First and Last Men (1930); Aldous Huxley, Point Counter Point (1928), and Brave New World (1932).

ENGL 5323-001 | Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Short Fiction:The Gothic

Dr. Ann Daghistany
Monday 11:00 AM -1:50 PM

Requirements filled: Post-1865 American period requirement; Fiction genre requirement

The course will begin with the earlier period as seen through the historical allegories of Hawthorne, including "My Kinsman, Major Molineux," "Young Goodman Brown," "The Maypole of Merrymount," and "The Scarlet Letter." We will study Poe's pre-Civil War racial satires "Hopfrog" and "The Black Cat" as well as "The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym." The gothic tales of A. Bernard, a.k.a. Louisa May Alcott, will be represented by her class and gender study, "Behind a Mask," among others; the Civil War stories in her autobiographical "Hospital Sketches" and "My Contraband" depict her experiences as a Civil War Nurse in Union Hospital, a converted hotel. We will read the later ghost stories of Henry James such as "The Turn of the Screw," and Edith Wharton's "The Lady's Maid's Bell." Our twin focus in this course will be upon the gothic tradition as well as nineteenth-century literature's portrait of history and the issues of race, gender and class. In addition, we will read three critical works. Teresa Goddu's Gothic America: Narrative, History and Nation gives close analysis of Hawthorne, Alcott and Poe, while Andrew Smith's Gothic Literature provides necessary European background. Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the Civil War by Catherine Clinton and Nina Silber will provide added historical context. Requirements include a 15-to-20 page paper on the student's selection from a list of topics, an oral presentation of that paper, three very short fiction/film papers, and a final.

ENGL 5324-001 | Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature
West of Everything

Dr. Sara Spurgeon
Friday 9:00-11:50 AM

Requirements filled: Post-1865 American period requirement

Class Closed

In this course we will examine 20th and 21st century texts engaging and challenging the myth of the frontier, including works by Native American, Chicano/a, Asian American, and Anglo American writers and directors. We will be exploring these texts from a number of different angles: What did the myth of the frontier look like in the past and what shape is it assuming in American culture today? How has it been used to justify or deconstruct contemporary American ideas about conquest, colonization, and empire? How might it work to define our ideas about gender, race, class, sexuality, national identity, borders, the environment, etc.? How has the myth of the frontier formed the genre we know today as the “Western” and why are we still writing and producing such texts? How do the works of non-Anglos writing from "the other side" of the frontier reinterpret that myth? We will be doing close readings of novels, films, and theory.

ENGL 5338-001 | Syntax

Dr. Min-Joo Kim
Monday 2:00-4:50 PM

Requirements filled: Linguistics area requirement

Syntax is a sub-discipline of linguistics that deals with sentence structure—that is, how grammatical sentences are formed and structured. This course aims to introduce the fundamental principles of theoretical syntax, and prepare students to conduct more advanced research in theoretical syntax and/or to apply the knowledge to other more applied disciplines such as language acquisition, language disorders, mass communication, machine translation, and artificial intelligence Students will learn analytical methods used in syntactic research such as how to analyze syntactic data drawn from various languages, how to formulate plausible hypotheses based on them, and how to compare and evaluate different theories and/or hypotheses. Topics will include but will not be limited to phrase structure rules, Case, binding, and movement (e.g., wh-movement, head-to-head movement)

There will be a textbook and some minimal reading assignments. But the course will proceed based largely on lectures and discussions about the weekly assignments. In addition to doing the weekly assignments, students will read a journal article and do a critique on it. Furthermore, students will write a research paper, utilizing the acquired knowledge of syntax in linguistic analysis. They will also make an in-class oral presentation on their research papers.

ENGL 5340-001 | Research Methods

Dr. Ann Hawkins
Tuesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Foundations course requirement

This course prepares students to undertake intensive literary research on the graduate level. Students will gain a thorough grounding in using library resources and in applying bibliographic theory. They will create enumerative and annotative bibliographies and write a textual history and/or research guide for their topic. Students will consider the technological aspect of books by analyzing their physical characteristics (binding, cover, printing, font, impression, etc) as well as their nature as socially constructed material objects. Students should expect to complete a variety of practical skills-building exercises in analytical and descriptive bibliography and in textual editing (including a project in TEI-coding for electronic editions). Note: This course covers traditional literary research methods, not strategies more associated with field research such as interviews and surveys. This is not a course in literary analysis or literary criticism, but in the historical, cultural and technological contexts of books, contexts which are essential to any understanding of a literary work.

ENGL 5340-002 | Research Methods

Dr. Jennifer Snead
Tuesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Foundations course requirement

This course prepares students to undertake intensive literary research on the graduate level. Students will gain a thorough grounding in using library resources and in applying bibliographic theory. They will create enumerative and annotative bibliographies and write a textual history and/or research guide for their topic. Students will consider the technological aspect of books by analyzing their physical characteristics (binding, cover, printing, font, impression, etc) as well as their nature as socially constructed material objects. Students should expect to complete a variety of practical skills-building exercises in analytical and descriptive bibliography and in textual editing (including a project in TEI-coding for electronic editions). Note: This course covers traditional literary research methods, not strategies more associated with field research such as interviews and surveys. This is not a course in literary analysis or literary criticism, but in the historical, cultural and technological contexts of books, contexts which are essential to any understanding of a literary work.

ENGL 5342-001 | Critical Methods

Dr. Jen Shelton
Monday 9:00-11:50 AM

Requirements filled: Foundations course requirement

Class Closed

This course will address major theoretical movements of the late 20th and early 21st century in order to give students tools to use in reading and writing literary criticism. The course will contextualize theory in terms of questions readers and writers frequently debate (such as intention, rhetoric, and so on) and will feature hands-on work with major theorists, including post-structuralists. Students should not expect to emerge from this class with a publishable seminar paper. Instead, the class, strongly pragmatic in nature, will feature a series of short assignments intended to help you both understand theory as promulgated by others and do theory of your own. Assignments will be four short essays, two or three brief in-class presentations, and a teaching presentation in which you will work with other students.

ENGL 5350-001 | Studies in Drama
Humanism, Skepticism, and Renaissance Revenge Tragedy

Dr. Timothy Crowley
Wednesday 9:00-11:50 AM

Requirements filled: Pre-1700 British period requirement; Drama genre requirement

Class Closed

This course examines the dramatic genre of revenge tragedy in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, with an eye to English theatrical contexts in relief with English and European intellectual contexts. Primary readings will include classical and continental works by authors such as Seneca and Michel de Montaigne, alongside English plays by authors such as Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Webster, and Tourneur.

ENGL 5350-002 | Studies in Drama
Comedy from Stage to Screen

Dr. Connie Kuriyama
Wednesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Film/Drama genre requirement

As Northrop Frye observes in Anatomy of Criticism, comedy is remarkably constant in its elemental form and content. It can bridge both temporal and cultural divides, and flourish in diverse genres and media, often with only slight modifications. In this course we will identify and trace major elements of Western dramatic comedy, both verbal and visual, through representative works, beginning with Aristophanes and concluding with the shift of comedy's primary locus from stage to film in the first decades of the twentieth century. The changes involved in the movement to film will get special attention.

Readings will include plays by Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Molière, Wilde, and Shaw, as well as selections in theory of comedy. Screenings will begin with silent film comedy, and end with a film made in the last decade. One or more screenings may be scheduled in addition to regular class meetings, in order to allow complete viewing of the films and adequate time for discussion.

ENGL 5351-001 | Studies in Film and Literature
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Space, Time, and Technology in the Cinema

Dr. Allison Whitney
Monday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Elective; Film/drama genre requirement

This course will examine the relationship between transportation and communications technologies and the cinema, considering both their representation in films and their influence on film style, narrative and spectatorship. We will focus on four major technological systems that revolutionized modern conceptions of space, time, speed, the senses, private and public spheres, and social relations: trains, automobiles, airplanes, and the telephone. We will consider how cinema, with its own powers of spatial and temporal manipulation, adapted to these technologies while also adopting their novel and uniquely modern characteristics into its own visual and auditory language. By examining the historical and conceptual connections among these technologies, we will not only highlight the role of the human-machine relationship in film spectatorship, but also observe how cinema's intimate relationship with machines allows it to act as a form of cultural memory, offering us the opportunity to imagine the cultural significance of a technology at a given historical moment. We will address films from a broad spectrum of historical periods and genres, including early cinema (The Great Train Robbery, The Lonely Villa, Suspense), film noir (Detour, Sorry Wrong Number), documentary (Night Mail), experimental film (Decasia), and Hollywood blockbusters (Star Wars, Top Gun), among others. Readings may include Harold Innis' The Bias of Communication, Lynne Kirby's Parallel Tracks: The Railroad and Silent Cinema, Leo Marx's The Machine in the Garden, David E. Nye's American Technological Sublime, Paul Virilio's War and Cinema: The Logistics of Perception and Michel Chion's The Voice in Cinema.

ENGL 5353-001 | Studies in Poetry
Thresholds: Liminal Experience in Modern and Contemporary Women's Poetry

Dr. Jacqueline Kolosov
Tuesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Post-1865 American period requirement; Poetry genre requirement

Liminality comes from the Latin līmen, meaning “threshold.” Anthropologist Victor Turner defines it as “a state of great intensity that cannot exist very long without some [stabilizing]… structure…” Jungians frequently frame the process of individuation as a journey through liminal space and time, from disorientation to integration.

In this seminar, we will use the concept of liminality as a way into the diverse aesthetics of six modern and contemporary women poets including H.D., Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Jorie Graham, Marie Howe, and Brigit Pegeen Kelly. To an important extent, each poet's art is grounded in or grows out of liminal experience, which is implicitly both individual and archetypal. The movement from disintegration towards integration reoccurs throughout the poets included here, even if that movement inevitably leads back to chaos, or profound uncertainty.

We will begin with H.D.'s Trilogy, which she wrote in London amid the bombings of WWII. Informed by her psychoanalytic work with Freud, out of the terror of this time—“this orgy of destructions”—H.D. turned inward to write a book of hope or resurrection, one that views poetry as a regenerative and healing force.

With Bishop, we will consider the themes of travel, the uncanny, and home-lessness in light of liminal experience, inevitably confronting Bishop's very early need to transform the instability of an orphaned childhood into the mode of knowledge that would empower her aesthetic. Sylvia Plath, like Bishop, places the uncanny or the unheimlich at the center of her Ariel poems. Yet for Plath, the uncanny is never about pleasure; her concerns are far more concentrated in the incantatory underground voices of a hidden self or selves. We will read both the original American edition of Ariel (1965) as well as the restored manuscript edition (2004).

Turning to the contemporary poets, we will begin with Jorie Graham's Erosion (1983), a collection in which the speaker journeys from the visible world into a realm of unknowing. Marie Howe's third collection, The Kingdom of Ordinary Time, is a book of spiritual and personal inquiry. Ordinary time marks the time in the calendar when there is an absence of the miraculous or the divine. For Howe, ordinary time becomes a personal metaphor as well, a time when illusions must be surrendered if one is to continue to live authentically in the world.

The course will conclude with Brigit Pegeen Kelly's The Orchard, beginning with Kelly's affinity with H.D.'s spiritual imagination, and honing in on her preoccupation with the uncanny. Kelly's poetry often takes place in a passionate, mythic realm and focuses on unsettling, liminal moments that simultaneously yield revelation or epiphany. There will be a midterm paper, and each student will give a 30 minute oral presentation, which will ideally provide the basis for the final paper.

ENGL 5355-001 | Studies in Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature Methods

Dr. Yuan Shu
Thursday 9:00-11:50 AM

Requirements filled: Comparative Literature area requirement

Seminar Canceled

ENGL 5370-001 | Creative Writing Workshop
Fiction

Dr. Dennis Covington
Monday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Creative Writing workshop requirement

This course will center on a frank and supportive discussion of student work. Participants will be expected to produce three short stories varying in length from 1500 to 5000 words, depending on the assignment, and to provide copies of the stories for distribution to the other members of the class. There will also be minor in-class and out-of-class assignments. Texts will be announced at a later date.

ENGL 5370-002 | Creative Writing Workshop
Poetry Writing

Dr. Curtis Bauer
Wednesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Creative Writing workshop requirements

This workshop will examine issues of craft and vision through the practice of poetry. We will consider technical and historical aspects of poetry writing, as well as discuss and formulate our own “poetics.” The group will work to form a responsive, critical audience for one another's work. Though our primary text will be student writing, we will also practice close readings of individual poems by contemporary poets, as well as contemporary essays on craft, theory, legacy, and the creative process. From this we will consider the fine points of writing poetry (e.g., line break, meter, scansion, stanzaic form, image, tension, and metaphor), and the larger issues of writing as it relates to politics, publishing, influence, voice, personal and social responsibility, and ethics. Students will write a new poem each week, and at semester's end turn in a final portfolio of poems with a formal introduction that outlines their poetics.

ENGL 5380-001 | Advanced Problems in Literary Study
Eighteenth-Century Readers and Authors

Dr. Marta Kvande
Monday 2:00-4:50 PM

Requirements filled: Post-1700 British area requirement; publishing certificate; Book History requirement

Seminar Canceled

ENGL 5380-002 | Advanced Problems in Literary Study
Contemporary Spanish and American Poetry

Dr. Curtis Bauer
Monday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: Post-1865 American area requirement; Comparative Literature program requirement; Poetry genre requirement

In this course we will explore Modernity and beyond through the lens of poetry from both Spain and the United States. We will study representative poems of, and literature about the multiple schools and generations in both countries in order to identify and map degrees of influence and departure across the twentieth and into the twenty-first century. The reading list will include Spanish poems (bilingual texts) from the Generation of '27 and the Novísimos, up to the most recent generation of writers in Spain, “The Generation of 2000,” as coined by the critic Luis Antonio de Villena. The reading list will also include equally influential poets from the U.S., including Pound, Eliot, Rukeyser and H.D., the New York School, Confessional Poets, up to a selection of emerging American writers. Students will be expected to contribute weekly to group WIKI discussions, present on a course text and/or school of poetry to his/her peers and complete an article-length research paper.

ENGL 5380-003 | Advanced Problems in Literary Study
The Art and Theory of Translation

Dr. Wendell Aycock
Tuesday 9:30 AM -12:20 PM

Requirements filled: Comparative Literature program requirement

Seminar Canceled

ENGL 5380-004 | Advanced Problems in Literary Study
North and South: Imagining American Geographies, 1700 to 1865

Dr. Michele Navakas
Wednesday 6:00-8:50 PM
Requirements filled: Pre-1865 American period requirement

While U.S. regionalism is usually considered a nineteenth-century development, this course begins by examining the even earlier roots of the notions of “North” and “South,” starting with Anglo-American writing of the early eighteenth century such as William Byrd's History of the Dividing Line (1728) that considers everything below Virginia to be productive of “gross humours” and a great “refuge for all debtors and fugitives.” Together we will consider various genres of writing that arose as America moved from colony to nation and empire, and ask how they imagine the diverse climates, geographies, and populations that America's ever-changing borders sought to contain. As we read both classic and lesser known literary works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will focus on the constantly contested notion of nationhood. In particular, we will think about how concepts of sovereignty, possession, expansion, settlement, and founding that develop in response to various southern topographies and climates put pressure on the more salient ideals of national identity that took shape on northern grounds.

Readings will include William Byrd, History of the Dividing Line; Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer; Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Huntly; Poe, Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym; William Wells Brown, Clotel; Or, The President's Daughter; and Harriet Beecher Stowe, Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp.

ENGL 5380-005 | Advanced Problems in Literary Study
Many Tongues: Translating Middle English Literature

Dr. Julie Nelson Couch
Wednesday 12:00 noon-3:00 PM

Requirements filled: Pre-1700 British period requirement; High Proficiency language requirement; Poetry genre requirement

Class Closed

This course will introduce students to the grammar, syntax, vocabulary, phonology, and prosody of Middle English. The term Middle English encompasses an array of regional dialects that coexisted in England after the Norman Conquest in 1066 and before the standardization of English in 1430. Students will gain proficiency in distinguishing between and reading the different regional dialects that comprise Middle English. As a result, students will be able to comprehend and read aloud Middle English prose and poetry, from a twelfth-century debate poem between an owl and a nightingale to late fourteenth-century romance poetry. This course will prepare students to study a major Middle English corpus (Chaucer, the Pearl Poet, or Romance and saints lives) in the Medieval British Literature course (English 5303) to be offered in the spring. This course will be of interest to literature students as well as to linguistics and creative writing students interested in the theory and praxis of translation. Class time will be spent hearing, translating, and pronouncing the language. Students' work with Middle English will culminate in a translation/transcription project and in a dramatic reading of a bawdy tale by Chaucer. Course requirements also include a mid-term and a final exam.

ENGL 5390-001 | Writing for Publication

Dr. Lara Crowley
Tuesday 9:00-11:50 AM

Requirements filled: MA/PhD professional development requirement

Note: this section of ENGL 5390 is geared toward graduate students in English literature, creative writing, and linguistics. Students from other departments should contact Dr. Joyce Carter (joyce.carter@ttu.edu) to see if the Technical Communication and Rhetoric division of the English Department is offering a section of ENGL 5390 which may be more suitable to students in other disciplines.

Class Closed

Description: This course focuses on the process of preparing an essay for submission to a peer-review journal. Each student begins with a previously prepared essay (15-25 pages) that he/she wishes to revise. Students prepare and present a conference-length version of this research and determine an appropriate conference for presenting such a paper. They also consider appropriate journals for their essays, in part by analyzing critical approaches and emphases found among articles in various journals, and then tailor their submissions for their target journals. In addition to revising their own essays, students participate in peer-editing workshops, write cover letters, and learn about related issues, such as how one obtains grants for research in libraries and archives, publishes book reviews, and develops proposals for books, collections, and editions. Although this course takes a practical approach to scholarly publication, we also consider throughout the semester how one might define scholarly success in this field, and each student develops a research agenda that will encourage future success.

ENGL 5390-002 | Writing for Publication

Dr. Marta Kvande
Tuesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: MA/PhD professional development requirement

Note: this section of ENGL 5390 is geared toward graduate students in English literature, creative writing, and linguistics. Students from other departments should contact Dr. Joyce Carter (joyce.carter@ttu.edu) to see if the Technical Communication and Rhetoric division of the English Department is offering a section of ENGL 5390 which may be more suitable to students in other disciplines.

Class Closed

Description: This is a pragmatic course focusing on the process of preparing an essay for submission to a peer-reviewed journal and on professional activity more broadly. Students must begin the course with a previously-prepared article-length critical paper (5,000 to 7,000 words), usually one from a previous graduate course. Revising this essay for publication (including peer workshops and other revision practices) will be one of the major projects of the course. In addition, students will also learn and practice other aspects of the scholarly process, such as preparing and presenting conference-length papers, determining appropriate venues for their work (both conferences and journals), composing cover letters, applying for grants, writing book proposals, and writing book reviews, among other scholarly genres and conventions. As they learn more about the process of professionalisation, students will also develop research agendas to help encourage their professional success.

ENGL 5390-003 | Writing for Publication

Dr. Scott Baugh
Tuesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Requirements filled: MA/PhD professional development requirement

Note: this section of ENGL 5390 is geared toward graduate students in English literature, creative writing, and linguistics. Students from other departments should contact Dr. Joyce Carter (joyce.carter@ttu.edu) to see if the Technical Communication and Rhetoric division of the English Department is offering a section of ENGL 5390 which may be more suitable to students in other disciplines.

Class Closed

The self-evident goal of this seminar is to provide structure and support for writer-scholars to prepare their writing for publication. Practical activities—writing workshops, conference-style presentations, guideline and procedural overviews, etc.—aim at this primary goal of preparing an article-length manuscript for submission. Further, a range of writing exercises, time-management tools, and resources will aid writer-scholars to maintain writing-for-publication habits and scholarly development.

A greater aim of this seminar, however, focuses on examining the current role of publishing in our discipline and a range of styles of scholarship available to graduate students in the humanities. With these contexts in mind, each seminar participant will customize a research agenda, contemplate the role of publishing in her or his own course of professional development, and strive toward refining and projecting a professional profile.

The Chicago Manual of Style(15th ed.), Publication Manual of the APA (5th ed.), and The MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd ed.) will function as both invaluable references for matters of style and convention as well as essential guides for scholarly activity. Orders for the MLA Style Manual and Guide will be made through the campus bookstores, although copies of all three of these references are available online. A course reader, which is available as an electronic reserve, will cover a range of supplementary topics, most likely including Ernest Boyer and Lee Shulman on scholarship of teaching; James Hoge and Robert Patten on scholarly reviews; MLA reports and Profession articles on evaluation of scholarship within the academy; current reports on new media and rights; etc.

Assignments will include a publishable article (12+ pages); a conference-style presentation (12 minutes); a publishable book review or review essay (2-5 pages); a survey-of-scholarship report (7+ pages); and a series of resources reports (open format) that will guide your article revision. In addition to traditional seminar activities and discussions, some required participation will take advantage of our department Moodle.