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Setting Up an Internship

Introduction | Proposal | Internship Report | Portfolio
Grades | Internship Agreement | Locating an Internship
Internet-Based Internship


Introduction

Internships or job cooperatives can fulfill degree requirements and enhance career preparation for both undergraduate and graduate students in technical communication. Some companies hire permanent employees only from their intern pool. The faculty strongly recommend that students complete internships. 

A student may arrange an internship for the job experience alone, but a student who seeks academic credit for the internship must enroll in a course and complete its requirements in addition to the internship responsibilities. Undergraduates enroll in ENGL 4378, and graduate students enroll in ENGL 5378.

The main academic course requirement is to complete an internship report and a portfolio (print or electronic) of work accomplished. The faculty supervisor may also require periodic meetings to review the work accomplished.

The internship should require the type of work that a professional technical communicator might be expected to do. Thus, it will involve substantial writing, editing, and design. The work plus the outside research and report should roughly equal the amount of work that an organized course would require. An estimate of that workload is 125-150 hours.

Both the undergraduate and graduate courses require a proposal and the approval of the Director of Technical Communication. Approval for the internship must be granted before registration and at least two weeks before the semester begins. The proposal for the research report may be submitted after the work begins and the intern understands job responsibilities.

Proposal

The proposal includes a form, a statement of the position and responsibilities, probable topic for the internship report, and letter from a faculty member in technical communication who agrees to supervise the internship. The proposal goes to the Director of Technical Communication. You can download the internship proposal form here.

See a sample proposal for an internship conducted via the Internet. The proposal is explicit about the work involved in the internship and its relationship to technical communication. It names the faculty advisor. It also proposes several possible research projects.

Internship Report

The internship report is a substantial research report, not a log of daily activities. The report should relate to the internship work and should provide some basis for the decisions that the daily work requires. In addition, the report for graduate students must indicate knowledge of the literature related to the work assignment, much as an organized course requires reading of the professional literature to support class assignments.

Goals of the internship report

Examples of internship reports

  1. A student whose internship required development of employee policy and procedure manuals for nonprofit organizations completed a literature review on the contents, structure, and style of policy and procedure manuals. She explored literature in management as well as in technical communication.
  2. A student who also worked on policy and procedure manuals reviewed some literature but also interviewed employees to test her drafts and learn their attitudes toward the policies and procedures and the wording in the manual. The report analyzed the responses and the implications for the manual.
  3. A student who developed an online help system for a computer company reported on the research about hypertext navigation and screen design.

Portfolio

The portfolio is a collection of documents that you developed as part of your internship. Each document should include a cover page explaining your achievements and the significance of the document.

A print portfolio is often collected in a ring binder with dividers separating the individual documents.

An electronic portfolio may be a web site with a home page identifying the contents and linking to the individual items. Like a print portfolio, the web site should include explanations of the documents, including your achievements and their significance.

Grades and Academic Requirements

You and your faculty supervisor will work out the details of meetings and grading. If your internship is local, your supervisor may require you to meet with him or her every week or two to review work assignments and progress. A long-distance internship may require correspondence by mail or email.

The grade is based largely on the internship report. At least 50% of the grade (and as much as 75%) is based on the report. The rest of the grade comes from a portfolio of work completed as part of the internship responsibilities. The work supervisor does not assign the course grade (because that person is not a Texas Tech faculty member in English), but that person may write an assessment of your performance and professionalism that the faculty member will consider in assigning the grade.

Internship Agreement

Before the internship begins, you, your faculty advisor, and your workplace sponsor should agree to the terms of the internship. These terms will include:

The agreement can be a memo that the responsible parties sign.

Locating an Internship

Students must locate their own internships, but the Director of Technical Communication has some contacts, and the employers who participate each spring in the Technical Communication Job Fair interview prospective interns as well as prospective employees.

Internships may be paid or unpaid. The Texas Tech faculty encourage paid internships, but their main interest is that the type of work completed is technical communication. Some helpful internship opportunities are available through nonprofit organizations.

Last update: September 10, 2007