Texas Tech University

TCR Graduate Courses Fall 2010

Online Courses (~6:00 – ~7:30 p.m.) 

Course Title Instructor sections CRN MOO
ENGL 5363 Research Methods in TCR Rickly

D21

15066

Tues

  " x21

23802

Wed

ENGL 5361: Introduction to Rhetorical Theory Rice

D21
x21

23800
23801

Thurs

ENGL 5368 Theories of Argumentation Carter

D21
x21

24315
24316

Mon

ENGL 5371 Foundations of Technical Communication Baake

D21

15206

Tues

" Baake

x21

23804

Thurs

ENGL 5379 Empirical Methods Eaton

D21
x21

26581
26582

Tues

ENGL 5377 Theoretical Approaches:  Intercultural Communication Still

D21
x21

15298
23817

Wed

ENGL 5390 Writing for Publication Lang

D21
x21

18850
18851

Mon

ENGL 5376: Online Publishing
hybrid (online + on-campus)
Baehr

001

15286

T 11-2

ENGL 5387: Publication Management
hybrid (online + on-campus)
Baehr

001

24320

Th 11-2

Note: All online students register for section D21 except non-Texas-resident online doctoral students, who register for section x21

On-campus Courses

Course Instructor section CRN Date Room
ENGL 5060 History and Theory of College Composition Kemp 001

15494

TTh 12:30

303

ENGL 5060 History and Theory of College Composition Rice 002

15502

TTh 12:30

352

ENGL 5377 Theoretical Approaches:  Intercultural Communication Still 001

15293

MW 12:30

303

ENGL 5361 Introduction to Rhetorical Theory Kemp

001

24313

TTh 9:30

303

ENGL 5363 Research Methods in TCR Cargile Cook 001

15059

TTh 3:30

353

ENGL 5371 Foundations of Technical Communication Booher 001

15203

W 5-8

352

ENGL 5368 Theories of Argumentation Carter 001

24314

TTh 11:00

352

ENGL 5376: Online Publishing Baehr 001

15286

T 11-2

357

ENGL 5384: Rhetoric of Scientific Literature Zdenek

001

15358

TTh 2:00

352

ENGL 5387: Publication Management Baehr 001

24320

Th 11-2

357

Descriptions

English 5060: History and Theory of College Composition  (Drs. Rice and  Kemp)

English 5060 is a 3 credit workshop-style course which provides an introduction to the history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric studies. We begin from the premise that good teachers are reflective teachers, and good teachers of writing are reflective teachers of writing. We will examine and reflect on the development of the field of composition over the last 50 years, focusing on seminal articles that represent the discipline. That is, we'll study readings about teaching basic writing, service-learning, online writing, revision, research writing, proofreading and editing, portfolios, and assessment rubrics within the context of composition. And just as the field of composition integrates new media tools in its construction, presentation, and assessment, so too will we.

http://richrice.com/5060.

English 5361: Introduction to Rhetorical Theory (Kemp)

http://ttopic.english.ttu.edu/manual/manualframe.asp?typeof=5361_fa10

English 5363: Research Methods in Technical Communication and Rhetoric (Rickly)

This course will introduce you to a variety of research methods and methodologies used in Composition and Technical Communication and Rhetoric research. While this course does serve as an overview, we will concentrate primarily on work that has influenced our broad field for the past ten years. The work you do in this course will give you an orientation which will prove to be valuable as you select further research courses from which you will ground your dissertation research. In subsequent, more focused research courses, you'll build upon the overview knowledge base you'll get in 5363.

The course builds on the assumption that research is intimately related to context, theory, and practice, and that all research—quantitative, qualitative, or mixed—is an act of selecting and interpreting information. Throughout the course, we will explore the implications of these assumptions, test their applicability to specific research methodologies, and look for common ways in which they shape the work of researchers using different research methods and approaches. Our central questions for this course will be "what constitutes a good, workable research question?" and "how do I select the best method to answer that question?". As a participant in this class, you will read critically texts on conducting research as well as evaluate existing research, and this experience will enable you to address the central questions from an informed perspective.

English 5368: Studies in Written Argumentation

In this course we will examine theoretical and practical aspects of argumentation. Our emphasis will be on understanding the varied threads that have come together in the past 25 years to form somewhat of a recognizable field: Logic, Rhetoric, Dialectic. Since this course is being offered within a Technical Communication and Rhetoric program, we will focus the bulk of our attention to the rhetorical aspects of this field. In addition, we will examine the role of argumentation theory in our technological world. In broad terms, our reading and writing about argumentation theory will focus on the following four questions:

  • How is argumentation defined as a field of study?
  • What theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives influence the field?
  • What methods does the field value and use to produce knowledge?
  • What happens to the scope, effectiveness, and structure of argumentation as our society turns increasingly towards technology?  Consider the web, cyberspace more generally, instant messenger technology, and so on.

Required Books

Bizell, Patricia, and Bruce Hertzberg. The Rhetorical Tradition : Readings from Classical Times to the Present, 2nd ed. St. Martin's, 2001. [amazon]

Aguayo, Angela, and Timothy Steffensmeier Readings on Argumentation. Strata, 2008.[amazon]

van Eemeren, Frans H., Rob Grootendorst, and Tjark Kruiger.  Fundamentals of Argumentation Theory : A Handbook of Historical Backgrounds and Contemporary Development. Erlbaum, 1996. [amazon]

Course website http://argtheory.wordpress.com/

English 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication (Booher)

description to follow

English 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication (Baake)

Technical communicators work alone and with others to prepare documents and presentations that communicate information within business, government, industry, and the scientific community—any workplace setting. Because the academic field of technical communication is relatively young, we are still trying to define technical communication as a discipline and still trying to determine what types of communicative acts are included in the field. Technical writers respond to a problem, whether that is in providing instructions to users of technology, writing a workplace report, presenting information on a Web page, or reporting on scientific findings. Often times a technical writer faces a rhetorical situation in which he or she must develop written communications to address the problem. (A problem also is known in rhetorical theory as an exigency). Hence, this course will follow the same approach, which I am calling a “problem-based approach.” Students should see themselves as technical rhetoricians who seek out problems and then offer suggestions for solving them. Look for examples of technical communications problems in the readings, in our class discussions, and in your own workplace experiences. Envision rhetorical strategies for solving them.

The class comprises English graduate students, including those who are in the Ph.D. Technical Communication and Rhetoric program, the MA Technical Communication program, and in Literature programs. The class will occur in two ways:

Regular MOO meetings, which will involve class discussions about the readings and our projects and collaborative activities.

Written postings. Students and I will write prompts and responses to the class readings and previous class discussions. Each posting will go to our electronic bulletin board, Web Board or a similar platform.

Books and coursepack readings

Johnson-Eilola, Johndan & Stuart A. Selber, (Eds.). Central Works in Technical Communication. New York: Oxford UP, 2004. ISBN: 978-0195157055

Gerald J. and Dale L. Sullivan (Eds.) Writing a Professional Life: Stories of Technical Communicators On and Off the Job. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2001. ISBN: 978-0205321063

A third book to be decided.

Coursepack readings posted to Web Board.

ENGL 5376: Online Publishing

This course will provide an overview of the practical and theoretical aspects of designing effective online documents and Web sites. Specifically, our work will focus on process and planning, content development, site structure, navigation, visual design, interface design, usability, and accessibility.The course will cover practical skills with various software tools and scripting languages, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript and DHTML. Assignments will primarily focus on developing Web sites using a variety of tools and development methods. And finally, the course will address several core issues in hypertext theory such as digital literacy, authorship, credibility, and digital rhetoric.

English 5377: Intercultural Communication

Initially, this course will expose students to foundational readings related to the study of intercultural communication, including Hofstede, Hall, Trompenaars, Hampden-Turner, Schwartz, du Gay, and Appadurai. Moving toward taking our own positions on the subject, we will read and interrogate the state of intercultural communication in TC. Ultimately, the aim is to build upon but not take for granted such scholarship as we carve out informed but novel perspectives on topics related to intercultural communication such as technology adoption and use, online international interactions (to include information design for international users), hybrid or intercultural identity vs national identity, translation and localization, interpersonal or face-to-face intercultural communication, intercultural communication in the workplace and in the classroom.

I've not yet determined all readings but will make available by the Summer any readings that must be purchased. Most core readings for the class, however, will be articles that I provide free access to via the course web site.

Expect possible assignments to be a major paper, presentation, discussion forum, literature analysis, and some form of empirical project (such as the building out of an intercultural teaching unit for a specific class, a web site or other online communication tool, or carrying out a small scale quasi-experimental study).

English 5379 Empirical Research Methods

The primary goals of this course are to make students intelligent consumers of quantitative research and to provide the necessary understanding so they can design their own study, should they have a research question that can be investigated with quantitative methods.

In this course, we will cover underlying concepts such as sampling, reliability, validity, descriptive and inferential statistics*; use of statistical programs such as SPSS®; and genres, including surveys, quasi-experiments, and experiments. We will study situations in which quantitative research methods are valuable and when they are not, and study and critique examples of quantitative research in psychology, composition, and technical communication. We will study the nature and value of quantitative methods, and review the debate in English over their use. And finally, students will design a small study of their own to practice these skills.

*No experience with research methods or statistics is necessary—all concepts will be introduced or reviewed.

Tentative Textbooks and Materials

Frey, Baton, and Kreps. Investigating Communication: An Introduction to Research Methods. Allyn and Bacon, 2nd Edition.

Green, Samuel B. and Neil J. Salkind. Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding Data. 5th edition.

A six-month license for SPSS software, currently $35.

English 5387: Publication Management

This course covers strategies of process and knowledge management that support the document publication cycle in a professional setting. Specific work assignments involve content development for both print and online documents, including static and dynamic Web site content. It addresses key issues in publication project management, including process maturity, content models and units, project plan development, single-sourcing strategies, and methods of tracking and assessment. Specific tools and technologies covered in this course include XHTML, XML, CSS, and working with content management systems. Your work for the course will involve the development of a single-sourcing project and deliverables related to the management, scheduling, progress, and presentation of this project.