Texas Tech University

TCR Grad Courses, Fall 2014

Online Courses (6:00 – ~9:00 p.m. central)

Course Title Instructor sections CRN Day
ENGL 5361: Intro to Rhetorical Theory (theory) Rice

D01

32538 Monday nights
ENGL 5363: Introduction to Research Methods (hybrid) Cargile Cook

D01

32537 Mondays 6-9 pm
ENGL 5368: Studies in Written Argumentation (theory) (hybrid) Carter D01 32532 Tuesday 6-9 pm
ENGL 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication Moore

D01

32543 Wednesday nights
ENGL 5374: Technical Editing (applied theory) Eaton

D01

32540 Wednesday nights
ENGL 5382: Theory and Research in the Discourses of Health and Medicine (theory, methods) Koerber

D01

32544 Thursday nights
ENGL 5385: Ethics (theory) Dragga

D01

32539 Tuesday nights

On-campus Courses

Course Instructor section CRN time Room
ENGL 5060: History and Theories of College Composition Rickly 001 15494 W 6-9 pm 303
ENGL 5060: History and Theories of College Composition Rickly 002 15502 TTh 3:30
ENGL 5363: Introduction to Research Methods (hybrid) Cargile Cook 001

15059

M 6-9 pm 358
ENGL 5368: Studies in Written Argumentation (theory) (hybrid) Carter

001

34053 Tuesday 6-9 pm 358
ENGL 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication Moore 001

15203

MW 3:30-4:50 pm 358
ENGL 5374: Technical Editing (applied theory) Eaton 001

32531

MW 2:00-3:20 pm 358

Descriptions

English 5361: Intro to Rhetorical Theory (Dr. Rice)

English 5361 is a 3 credit course which provides an overview of the history and theory of rhetoric from classical times to the present, especially as they relate to inventio, and especially as they demonstrate the multicultural and global nature of rhetoric. The concept of invention in classical rhetoric is one of selection, whereas in contemporary times invention suggests new knowledge. The making of new knowledge, however, is a process that is always already socially construction, especially in an era of social knowledge making. ENGL5361 meets Monday 6-7:30pm CST through synchronous chat, with Skype as a backup.

For more info, go to the course website:http://richrice.com/5361

English 5368: Studies in Written Argumentation (Dr. Carter)

In this course we will examine theoretical and practical aspects of argumentation. Our emphasis will be on understanding the varied threads that have come together in the past 25 years to form somewhat of a recognizable field: Logic, Rhetoric, Dialectic. Since this course is being offered within a Technical Communication and Rhetoric program, we will focus the bulk of our attention to the rhetorical aspects of this field. In addition, we will examine the role of argumentation theory in our technological world. In broad terms, our reading and writing about argumentation theory will focus on the following four questions:

  • How is argumentation defined as a field of study?
  • What theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives influence the field?
  • What methods does the field value and use to produce knowledge?
  • What happens to the scope, effectiveness, and structure of argumentation as our society turns increasingly towards technology? Consider the web, cyberspace more generally, instant messenger technology, and so on.

Required Books

Bizell, Patricia, and Bruce Hertzberg. The Rhetorical Tradition : Readings from Classical Times to the Present, 2nd ed. St. Martin's, 2001. [amazon]

Aguayo, Angela, and Timothy Steffensmeier Readings on Argumentation. Strata, 2008. [amazon]

van Eemeren, Frans H., Rob Grootendorst, and Tjark Kruiger. Fundamentals of Argumentation Theory : A Handbook of Historical Backgrounds and Contemporary Development. Erlbaum, 1996. [amazon]

Course website: TBA

English 5382: Theory and Research in the Discourses of Health and Medicine (Dr. Koerber)

ENGL 5382 (Theory and Research in the Discourses of Health and Medicine) introduces current theory and research in medical rhetoric, health communication, and related areas of inquiry. Although the primary focus is scholarship in technical communication and rhetoric, the course also includes some texts from other disciplines that take an interest in medicine such as communication studies, sociology, and anthropology. The syllabus from a previous offering of the course is available at https://www.academia.edu/5301761/Medical_Rhetoric_Fall_2013. The course will be slightly different this time because we have funding to provide a 12-month license for NVivo 10 qualitative analysis software to each student who enrolls. Thus, some instruction in best practices and basic use of NVivo 10 will be included in the course.