Texas Tech University

TCR Grad Courses, Fall 2015

Online Courses: 6:00 – ~9:00 p.m. CST

Course Title Instructor Sections CRN Day
ENGL 5363: Introduction to Research Methods
Koerber D01 32537 Mon
ENGL 5390: Writing for Publication Dragga D01 35504 Mon
ENGL 5391: Grants and Proposals for Nonprofits Eaton D01 36382 Tues
ENGL 5387: Publication Management Faris D21 27716 Tues
ENGL 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication Wilson D01 32543 Wed
ENGL 5388: Usability Testing Still D01 35503 Wed
ENGL 5369: Theories of Technology Carter D21 15191 Thurs
ENGL 5377: Representing climate change: How myth, science, and rhetoric have assessed the human threat to our planet.
Baake TBD TBD Thurs

On-campus Courses

Course Title Instructor Sections CRN Days/Time Room
ENGL 5363: Introduction to Research Methods
Koerber 001 15059 Mon 6-9 p.m. 303
ENGL 5377: Representing climate change: How myth, science, and rhetoric have assessed the human threat to our planet. Baake 001 TBD Thurs6-9 p.m. 358
ENGL 5371: Foundations of Technical Communication Wilson 001 15203 MW 4 p.m. 358
ENGL 5060: History and Theory of College Composition  Rice 001 15494 MW 12 p.m. 352
ENGL 5386: Web Accessibility and Disability Studies Zdenek 001 35501 TR 2 p.m. 353
ENGL 5387: Publication Management Faris 001 35502 TR 3:30 p.m. 358

Descriptions

ENGL 5060: History and Theories of College Composition

English 5060 is a variable credit course which provides an introduction to the history and contemporary theories of composition and rhetoric. We begin from the premise that good teachers are reflective teachers, and good teachers of writing are reflective teachers of writing. We will examine and reflect on the development of the field of composition over the last 50 years, focusing on seminal articles that represent the discipline. That is, we'll study readings about teaching basic writing, service-learning, online writing, revision, research writing, proofreading and editing, portfolios, and assessment rubrics within the context of composition in general. And just as the field of composition integrates new media tools in its construction, presentation, and assessment, so too will we. For more information, please see http://richrice.com/5060 .

ENGL 5377: Representing climate change: How myth, science, and rhetoric have assessed the human threat to our planet (Baake)
Hybrid

Climate change arguably is the biggest threat today to the planet and our place on it. Yet, humans have constantly faced environmental challenges, such as droughts that forced massive migrations of tribes from their homelands of the Middle East or American Southwest. Ancient texts such as found in the Bible told those stories through myths of the past and prophecy of the future. Today, science tells those stories in technical texts derived from complex computer modeling and forecasting. Rhetorical debates pit commonplaces of stewardship for the future against those of economic vibrancy today. But today's stories, science, and rhetoric still retain some of the same mythic elements, such that climate scientists can be seen by those who believe them as modern prophets, or by those who don't, as false prophets.

In this course we will spend time at the intersections of myth/scientific technical writing, and rhetoric as they relate to climate change and the environment. This course will involve reading literary, technical, and historical documents as well as short response papers to Blackboard (including a final exam) and a short mini-research project/poster presentation. We may work collectively on a project on behalf of the Texas Tech Climate Science Center

ENGL 5390: Writing for Publication (Dragga)
Online

Objective
This course is designed to teach students in Ph.D. programs how to write clear and effective articles for professional journals in their field. We will accomplish this objective through intensive study and practice of the rhetorical strategies of invention, arrangement, style, and written and oral delivery. We will examine submission requirements, the review and publication processes of journals, and legal and ethical responsibilities of writers.

Texts

  • The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing (Wiley, 2011) by Tonette S. Rocco, Tim Hatcher, & John W. Creswell
  • Writing for Scholars: A Practical Guide to Making Sense & Being Heard (Sage, 2015) by Lynn Nygaard

Assignments

  • Evaluation of information resources
  • Article proposal
  • Comparative critique of two articles
  • Oral presentation
  • Research article suitable for submission to a professional journal