Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2005 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

No description available.

English 2306
Section 006

Introduction to Drama

Constance Kuriyama

No description available.

English 2307
Section H01

Introduction to Fiction - Honors

Jen Shelton

No description available.

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2306
Section 026

Introduction to Fiction

Karen Clark

Thomas King asserts that “the truth about stories is that that's all we are.” The Anishinabe writer Gerald Vizenor reminds us that “you can't understand the world without telling a story.” And Leslie Marmon Silko maintains that stories “aren't just entertainment./Don't be fooled./ …You don't have anything,/if you don't have the stories.”

This course will introduce students to a variety of stories, in a variety of forms (the novel, the fable, the short story), from a variety of times, places, and cultures. For instance, we will consider stories of madness and love told by women of the Victorian period, both in England and the USA. We will explore stories of silence and oppression, as told by a contemporary South African writer as he “writes back” to the nineteenth-century classic story of Robinson Crusoe. We will experience stories that try to come to terms with the horrors of the twentieth-century, especially those of World War II, and we will examine the ways in which WWII asks us to reconsider the types of stories we tell. We will also encounter an Haida/Haisla story of loss, transformation, and shapeshifters, taking place on the Pacific Northwest Coast. We will even have the opportunity to read stories told by authors who are teaching right here at Texas Tech. From a variety of perspectives, then, fiction will allow us to journey through many worlds and our journeys through this material should ultimately reveal the importance of stories—sometimes entertaining, sometimes dangerous—as they engage with the political, personal and social spheres which we inhabit.

English 2307
Section 027, 031

Introduction to Fiction "Real Fiction"

Michael Holko

This introductory course will explore various literary works to investigate the degree to which there is "truth" in "fiction". Course work consists of daily journal entries, two "close-reading" assignments (900 word minimum each), and two "comparative" essays (1500 word minimum each).

English 2307
Section 038

Introduction to Fiction
The Ghost Story

Jennifer Frangos

This course will be an introduction to the study of fiction. We will focus on stories about ghosts and other apparitions, from early reports like the sighting of the Virgin of Guadalupe in the 16th century, through gothic novels of the 18th century and Victorian Christmas tales, to contemporary ghost stories and film.

English 2308
Section H01

Introduction to Nonfiction - Honors

Bryce Conrad

“Well, then, is the American, this new man?” asks J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, the author of Letters from an American Farmer (1782). That same question had been posed in various ways ever since the discovery of the new world, a place that to the European mind was, as William Carlos Williams would put it many years later, “beyond the sphere of all things known to history.” In some senses, Americans – whether Native Americans, African Americans, or European newcomers – have had to invent their answers to that question through the stories they have told of themselves and each other and their experience of this place. In indigenous creation stories, in tales of discovery and exploration, in histories of settlements and towns, in letters sent back across the Atlantic, in autobiographies and records of personal experience, in the narratives of fugitive slaves, we have collectively given shape and form to the cultural identity of Americans. This course will be devoted to readings from this rich body of American non-fiction, covering a variety of texts that will range from the late 15th century up through the period of the Civil War.

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2308
Section 004,005

Introduction to Nonfiction
Memoir

Gail Folkins Koehler

In creative nonfiction, writers find what's extraordinary in the everyday and beyond. This course focuses on memoir and the way lives are written. We will investigate approaches that include journalistic, lyrical, travel, and humor. In addition, we will explore memoir through writing activities. Assignments include four short essays, a final exam, and informal reading responses throughout.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Creative Writing

Staff

No description available.

English 2388
Section 161

Introduction to Film Studies

Scott Baugh

No description available.

English 2391
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

No description available.