Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2005 | 2000 Level

English 3302
Section 001

Old and Middle English Literature

Brian McFadden

No description available.

English 3304
Section 001

Medieval and Renaissance Drama

Constance Kuriyama

No description available.

English 3305
Section 001

British Renaissance Literature
God's Nation? Religion and Culture in Seventeenth-Century England

Feisal Mohamed

This course will examine the seventeenth century in terms of the religious controversy that is the period's central concern. From the assassination attempt on King James I, to the civil wars and execution of Charles I, to the restoration of monarchy, the political and religious tumults of this century often produce explosive consequences. We will explore how these concerns reveal themselves in key texts of the period, such as the devotional lyric poetry of John Donne and George Herbert and the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. We will also see in our study of the seventeenth century some of the first published female poets of the English tradition: Lady Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, and Lucy Hutchinson.

English 3307
Section 002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature

Jennifer Frangos

No description available.

English 3308
Section 002

Nineteenth Century British Literature
Victorian's Secrets

Sean Grass

This course will introduce you to the major social, cultural, and literary events of the Victorian period in England. As Dickens wrote in A Tale of Two Cities, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”—a remark that really is true of life during 1837-1901, the sixty-four years during which Queen Victoria ruled. The Victorians gave us Dickens and Darwin, railroads and public schools, and key expansions of voting rights, personal freedoms, literacy, and social opportunity. They also lived during a time when rapid urbanization and industrialization were destroying England's old agrarian society and driving the lower classes to poverty, homelessness, crime, and despair. Literature is a window upon this complicated world, and we shall use our texts to see into Victorians' secrets: the material, mental, and even sexual truths that shaped the Victorian age.

English 3309
Multiple Sections

Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Staff

No description available.

English 3323
Section 001,012

Early American Literature

Staff

This course is a survey of American literary history from the European conquests to the early US Republican period. Our goal will be to develop an ever-expanding notion of what constitutes American literature, and of how specific American literary traditions may have evolved into being. As a means to this end, we will continually interrogate our notions of what America is, of how writers and thinkers have tried to express what it means to be American, and of what literary critics do. Course topics will range from the language of exploration and of colonial encounters (Columbus, De las Casas), to the major strains of New England Puritanism (Bradford, Winthrop, Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards), the meanings of American individualism and liberty (Franklin, de Crevecoeur, Equiano, Jefferson), the mythology of American exceptionalism, and the position of dissent in American ideology.

English 3324
Section 001

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey

John Samson

This course will be a survey of the major fiction, nonfiction, and poetry of the century. We will focus on the American Renaissance in the antebellum period and on issues of class and gender during the Gilded Age following the war. Students will write three short (3-4 pp.) interpretive papers and a comprehensive final exam. .

English 3325
Section 003,004

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
Survey

Yuan Shu

This course explores how contemporary American authors have responded to the social, political, cultural, and technological changes in America since the 1960s, with a focus on the new senses of time and space that they have articulated and envisioned in what is now known as postmodern fiction. We first read texts that engage the technological changes in American society and explore the ways in which these authors question and negotiate this new dimension of humanity manifested in our changing technological culture. We then scrutinize writings of racial minorities and women and discuss the new critical vigor and vision that they have brought to American literature and culture. As a way of conclusion, we finally investigate texts that speculate upon the possibility of a post-ethnic, post-gender, and post-human society in America in the new millennium.

English 3337
Section H01

Modern and Contemporary World Literature -Honors
20th Century Poetry of Witness

John Poch

When human rights abuses are as prevalent as they have ever been, when we are at war, when political and religious violence against innocent civilians has become a daily occurrence, then what is the function or purpose of poetry? In this class, we will investigate the poetry of witness, in particular, poetry that responds to war and violent conflict now and throughout the 20th century. From poems that arise out of the Armenian genocide all the way through to poems responding to our own national tragedy on September 11, 2001, we will see how poets have “witnessed” and transformed our vicious world through crafted language.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany

Modern Continental Literature, which utilizes the approach of Comparative Literature, will focus on fiction, with some presentation on drama, that entail the twin themes of trauma and healing. Students will read works on important political conflicts and wars, as well as the healing aspects of art and relationships. Readings include Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago, on the Russian Revolution, Remarques's All Quiet on the Western Front, on World War I, Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians, on apartheid in South Africa, Hoeg's Smilla's Sense of Snow and Borderliners concerning Denmark and the Inuit, Allende's House of the Spirits on the Pinochet regime in Chile, Geraldine Brooks' March imagines the Civil War experience , Sena Jeter Naslund's Four Spirits on the American Civil Rights South, and Aziz' immigrant adventure in Lorraine Adams' Harbor.

English 3351
Genre: Poetry
Section 001

Creative Writing

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

No description available.

English 3351
Section 004

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Stephen Jones

No description available.

English 3351
Section 005

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

We will study the craft of poetry writing through the close reading of poetry from the U.S. and around the globe. Come prepared to: read closely and extensively; learn from masters in the craft and art by writing in their style; write; and revise your work.

English 3351
Section 007

Creative Writing
Genre: Non-fiction

Dennis Covington

No description available.

English 3351
Section 008

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

We will study the craft of poetry writing through the close reading of poetry from the U.S. and around the globe. Come prepared to: read closely and extensively; learn from masters in the craft and art by writing in their style; write; and revise your work.

English 3351
Section 009

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

William Wenthe

No description available.

English 3351
Section 011

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

We will study the craft of poetry writing through the close reading of poetry from the U.S. and around the globe. Come prepared to: read closely and extensively; learn from masters in the craft and art by writing in their style; write; and revise your work.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Vicki Hester

This course focuses on reading, writing, and thinking about current issues in composition for the purpose of introducing students to the many issues and research efforts that continue to shape the field of composition. While this course will build on contemporary issues in this field, there will be some historical review of composition as well. Students will read and write about successful approaches to professional writing and study successful teaching practices. Analyzing professional writing and teaching practices fosters the kind of reflection that leads to an understanding of the inner workings of writing processes.

To also add to this understanding, English 3360 requires students to write often, to comment on the writings of classmates, to analyze and comment on published writings, and to discuss why some writing fails and other writing works. In other words, this is a course in both theory and practice. We will think about theory and practice, and we will practice those theories that we study. English 3360 students will write multiple drafts for most assignments and produce a portfolio by the end of the semester according to the process theories we study during the semester. Students will practice theories of social construction as they work on group projects and provide peer commentaries for one another. By focusing on issues of theory and practice in composition, students work toward becoming members of an academic community of writers and writing teachers.

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Together, we will strive toward understanding what it means to have clearly defined theories and practices about writing and teaching writing—toward understanding what it means to reflect on those theories and practices, and why we should continually research to better understand the ongoing issues in teaching composition.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher.

English 3368
Section 002

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Rich Rice

Web design has become an essential and highly marketable skill for technical communicators. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the essentials of analyzing and designing functional Web sites. Our work will focus on both practical and theoretical aspects of Web design, including information architecture, interface design, visual design, navigation, content chunking, and usability testing. We will read and discuss articles written by contemporary theorists, and the products we produce will involve working in groups and using a variety of electronic communication methods. You will create, for instance, a Web site for an actual client.

English 3369
Section 001

Information Design

Locke Carter

Catalog Description: Principles of design, visual rhetoric, and visual communication; application of those principles in document design. Students learn theory and techniques in areas including typography, page layout, pre-press, and information graphic development, which they will use to complete document design projects. Students will create a portfolio of their design work.

Justification: Technical communication students need a thorough grounding in principles and techniques of visual design, since so much technical information today is conveyed visually. The need is increased by the fact that technical writers today are often asked to create whole documents without the aid of specialist graphic designers. Students also need an awareness of how the physical and visual design of documents affects how users read. This course will give them practical skills in managing these aspects of document creation.

English 3371
Section 001

Linguistic Science

Mary Jane Hurst

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. Our primary objective is to learn what language is and how language systems work. We will first examine the main components of language – sounds, word forms, and sentence structure – and we will then investigate principles of language variation and language change. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive, and our primary focus will be on the English language. Class meetings will be organized around a lecture-discussion format.

English 3372
Section 001

History of the English Language

Brian McFadden

No description available.

English 3373
Section 001,002

Modern English Syntax

Min-Joo Kim

In this course, we will be mainly focusing on addressing the following questions: (i) what is a language?; (ii) what does grammar consist of?; (iii) what is the difference between prescriptive vs. descriptive approaches to grammar?; (iv) what are the syntactic structures of different types of sentences in English?; (v) what is the set of principles that govern the grammar of English? Subtopics to be covered are: (i) syntactic categories (or parts of speech), phrase structures, (ii) clausal types, and their structures; (iii) syntactic transformations (e.g., passivization, question formation, topicalization). Students will be expected to complete three exams, which consist of two midterms and one final. There will be weekly assignments. Students will also submit an essay on a topic of their choice, where they will demonstrate that they have mastered certain concepts or aspects of grammar by applying them to more practical use such as teaching English or data collection of non-standard English. There will be a strict attendance policy, but it will not kick in on the first day of class.

English 3383
Section 001

Bible as Literature

James Whitlark

No description available.

English 3385
Section 001

Shakespeare

Marliss Desens

No description available.

English 3386
Section 001

Literature and Science
Science, Narrative, and Systems

Bruce Clarke

This will be an interdisciplinary class, with both literary and scientific content. The scientific focus will be on how the concept of systems connects modern developments in physics and biology to technology, computation, and information. These developments are often discussed under the names of cybernetics, information theory, chaos theory, complexity theory, systems science, and nanotechnology. We will study a series of texts introducing these developments in science and technology to the general reader, in the context of recent works in mainstream literature and science fiction that have explored and dramatized these connections. Students will take a midterm and a final exam, prepare short class reports, and write a midterm paper, building towards an end-of-term project that combines literary study with research on technoscientific topics.

English 3387
Section 001,002

Multicultural Literatures
African-American Literature and Culture

Sheila Collins

This course will explore the myriad ways African Americans define their culture and identity through the study of literature, movies, and music written, produced, and performed by African Americans. We will cover a wide range of texts beginning with the slave narrative of the nineteenth century and ending with writings, music, and movies influenced by hip hop culture of our present day. Through our study of writers like Ann Petry and rappers such as the Notorious B.I.G., we will examine how African Americans critique, challenge, and contest mainstream depictions of blackness through their writing. The course discussion will be guided by the following topics and questions: to what extent do the historical, political, and social events of the past 150 years impact and shape the African-American literary tradition; and what is African-American literature, and how does it, as a whole, fit in into American tradition as a whole?

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
African-American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3388
Section 002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Fictive Narrative

Scott Baugh

No description available.

English 3389
Section 001,002

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany

The Short Story will provide the student with eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context in which the form appeared. It will begin with the Classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period through the Rennaissance to the present day. The literary treatment of heroism, and passion, will be discussed. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing. Requirements include a creative short story written especially for this class, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and weekly quizzes on the readings.

English 3390
Section 001,002

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

This course aims to introduce students to a variety of texts from the region currently referred to as the American Southwest. We will explore traditional and contemporary Native poetry from the Southwest, early Anglo adventure writing, postmodern Chicano fiction, regional authors like Larry McMurtry and Cormac McCarthy, and barrio hip-hop verse from both sides of the US-Mexican border. What common threads run through these works? Where do visions collide or overlap? How is the sense of this region imagined across cultures, beyond history, and into a globalized future? We will attempt to answer these questions through close readings, class discussions, group presentations, two short essays, a mid-term and final, as well as in-class screenings of programs from the radio documentary series “Writing the Southwest,” featuring interviews with a number of this semester's authors.