Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2005 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Section 002

Introduction to Poetry
“Just Poetry”

Michael Holko

This introductory course will familiarize you with the various techniques used to shape poetry. We will also explore how poems operate as “fair” representations of thought and expression. Our survey will be organized around three general questions: How does a poem function as an object of beauty? To what degree does beauty influence the relationship between language and meaning? In what way does poetry reflect this relationship and its correlation to truth? With these questions in mind, our inquiry into matters of poetic form, diction and content will lead us to skillfully read, analyze and understand poetry as a contemplative and meaningful approach towards knowledge.

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

Poetry, says Robert Frost, is what is lost in translation. Poetry, however, may be a way of “translating” life into words, but it is also a way to deepen one's perception of life. Although analysis seems to kill – at least in the minds of some – analyzing poetry can open the poem to and for the reader.

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Dean Bowers

No description available.

English 2307
Section 009

Introduction to Fiction
Haunting Histories: Fictions of North American Native Writers

Karen Clark

This course will engage students in a detailed study of short fiction and novels by North American Native authors. We will aim to situate the texts within their particular historical, cultural, and geographical contexts, while considering such issues as the function of history (both oral and written) in each novel. More specifically, our class discussions will focus on the ways in which ghosts and haunting historical moments shape Native literatures in North America, thereby moving the class towards a consideration of the relationship between history and fiction, between narrative and memory, between specters and survival. Indeed, how do writings by North American First Peoples contest America's supposed “newness” – its lack of “pastness” – and Canada's supposed “ghostlessness”? At the same time, this class will also keep in mind the words of Susan Power:

“Native peoples, and their stories and histories are not a social studies unit of an interesting sub-category. […] We are American history. […] Every track and trace of the American experience runs through our communities, our culture. We have been the transformers so much more than we are ever credited to have been. I am so tired of our image as the transformed – the lost, the dead, always those who are acted upon, always those who have been pushed to the edges, where we can be watched compassionately, nostalgically, seen as little more than a decorative fringe.”

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2307
Section 019

Introduction to Fiction

Ya-hui Irenna Chang

This course aims to study fiction in relation to adaptation. Students will read short stories and novels written in different historical periods as well as by authors of different ethnic backgrounds. To compare and contrast how character, theme, setting, and point-of-view are treated in fiction and film, adaptations of two novels, Jane Eyre and Joy Luck Club, will be shown in the class.

English 2308
Section H02

Introduction to Nonfiction - Honors
Introduction to Nonfiction

Dennis Covington

This course will further acquaint students with the connection between the humanities and the natural sciences by focusing on literature about the natural world. We'll be reading In the Wilderness, by Kim Barnes; Refuge, by Terry Tempest Williams; and The End of Nature, by Bill McKibben. Students will be asked to write at least three prose pieces of their own based on observations in the field. Minor assignments will include in-class and out-of-class exercises. Hopefully, there will be opportunities for field trips to natural sites, including an optional weekend visit to Tech's Junction campus in the Texas hill country. The emphasis will be on careful observation, thoughtful reflection, and writing imbued with what Henry James called “solidity of specification.”

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Section 001

Introduction to Creative Writing

Gail Folkins Koehler

Students will explore creative writing through reading and writing assignments in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Along with honing our craft and finding the muse on an individual basis, we'll share work in a supportive workshop setting. We'll also look at the works of visiting writer Enid Shomer, in anticipation of her reading this spring.

English 2391
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 2391 is to introduce students to the premises and practices of literary analysis. We will focus on close reading and interpretive skills, argument and critical thinking, and an overview of literary criticism and theory. This course is writing intensive.

English 2391
Section 001

Introduction to Critical Writing
Doom and Gloom: Literature of Despair

Staff

This course will introduce students to the critical reading of prose, poetry, and drama and also to writing coherent critical arguments about them. The main theme and question of the course: Why do people give up on life, love, friendship, faith, country, and other things that humans cherish? Simple answers don't exist, and the texts I have chosen (along with the essay topics) will be challenging in their ways of getting to the heart of the issue.