Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2005 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 002

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Knights, Maidens & Love-Talk

Julie Nelson Couch

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the expectations genre imposes on the text. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing.

English 3304
Section 001

Medieval and Renaissance Drama
Shakespeare's Rivals

Constance Kuriyama

No description available. Please contact the teacher.

English 3307
Section 001

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature
Writers, Readers, Conversations 1660-1742

Jennifer Frangos

This course will be a survey of British literature written between 1660 and 1742, with an emphasis on reading these texts in their social and cultural contexts. We will look at major and minor writers, a wide variety of literary genres, and a range of supplementary materials (political treatises, scientific writing, art and music, fashion, maps, popular entertainments, and so forth). Our focus will be on the interplays between the writer, the written text, the reader, the culture at large, and so on… As we read and discuss, we will consider questions such as: How is a text created by a culture and how does it in turn help to create that culture? What problems, tensions, and issues does the literature seem to be working out for the culture? What issues seem important to literary texts, what issues seem unimportant, and why? Who has power in the culture, who is resisting or perpetuating that power structure, and how does literature (or a given literary text) reveal, perpetuate, resist, or re-imagine the culture's power structure?

English 3308
Section 001

Nineteenth Century British Literature
Mid-Century Transformations, 1820-1870

Ann Hawkins

The ends of the nineteenth-century—Romantic or Victorian—get the most press. But what do we call the middle? Is it Romantic or Victorian—or something else? This course takes that question as a starting point and examines a number of movements that seem to begin by being Romantic and end up Victorian. For example, how do we get from Sir Walter Scott's stories of knights and ladies to the Tennyson's Morte D'Arthur or Morris's “Defense of Guinevere”? What happens with Byron's legacy of iconoclasm that leads Carlyle to proclaim, “Close thy Byron, Open thy Goethe”? And why do the Victorians like Wordsworth so much?

The course will begin with a brief primer in Romanticism (to define our terms) and Shelley's Frankenstein; then we'll read through a variety of prose, poetry, drama, and non-fiction to address our central question. In particular, we'll look at disjunctions, places where the interests of the mid-nineteenth-century seem at odds with each other. We'll place, for example, Robert Browning's narratives of passion (often gone awry), particularly in the Ring and the Book, alongside Carlyle's vision of a new social order in Sartor Resartus. We'll examine the growing literature of social protest alongside contemporary ghost stories (by Mrs. Jewsbury and others) or nonsense texts like Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. And we'll think about how the pesky “woman question”-- particularly in Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh-- gets played out in the middle of a century that started with Wollstonecraft and Hannah More and ends with Victoria.

English 3309
Section J01

Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Staff

Course offered in Junction, Texas.
No description available.

English 3309
Section 001, 002

Modern and Contemporary British Literature
Modernism

Jen Shelton

No description available.

English 3309
Section 170

Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Staff

Course offered at Highland Lakes satellite campus in Marble Falls, Texas.

No description available.

English 3323
Section 001

Early American Literature
Survey

Cristobal Silva

This course is a survey of American literary history from the European conquests to the early US Republican period. Our goal will be to develop an ever-expanding notion of what constitutes American literature, and of how specific American literary traditions may have evolved into being. As a means to this end, we will continually interrogate our notions of what America is, of how writers and thinkers have tried to express what it means to be American, and of what literary critics do. Course topics will range from the language of exploration and of colonial encounters (Columbus, De las Casas), to the major strains of New England Puritanism (Bradford, Winthrop, Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards), the meanings of American individualism and liberty (Franklin, de Crevecoeur, Equiano, Jefferson), the mythology of American exceptionalism, and the position of dissent in American ideology.

English 3324
Section H01

Nineteenth Century American Literature - Honors
Literature and Culture

Bryce Conrad

The nineteenth century witnessed the rapid transformation of America from an agrarian society to an urbanized and mechanized civilization. The pace of change was so fast that Henry Adams, a prominent intellectual of the day, developed the idea of “the law of acceleration” in history to explain the forces that were moving America forward with such precipitous speed. We will not simply read literature as an illustration of history, but investigate how literature both reacts to and participates in the cultural debates and historical tensions of this dynamic era. Authors to be covered include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Alan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson, Rebecca Harding Davis, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane.

* You need a 3.0 overall GPA to enroll in an Honors section. It puts you in a small class with other people with 3.0's and higher. The courseload is no heavier than normal. Preparation and participation may be higher. To enroll please go to the Honors College, McClellan Hall 103.

English 3324
Section 002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey of Poetry and Fiction

John Samson

The course will survey poetry and fiction of the period, beginning with traditional poetry of the early century, then proceeding to the American Renaissance and continuing with literature of the post-Civil War period. Lectures on literary history will be combined with discussions of individual texts. .

English 3325
Multiple Sections

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
20th Century American Poetry: Selected Authors

Doug Crowell

A study of the poetry of William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, A.R. Ammons, and Alice Fulton.

English 3337

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany

Modern Continental Literature, which utilizes the approach of Comparative Literature, will focus on fiction, with some presentation on drama, that entail the twin themes of trauma and healing. Students will read works on important political conflicts and wars, as well as the healing aspects of art and relationships. Readings include Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago, on the Russian Revolution, Remarques's All Quiet on the Western Front, on World War I, Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians, on apartheid in South Africa, Hoeg's Smilla's Sense of Snow and Borderliners concerning Denmark and the Inuit, Allende's House of the Spirits on the Pinochet regime in Chile, Dan Fesperman's The Small Boat of Great Sorrows set in the Balkans, Sena Jeter Naslund's Four Spirits on the American Civil Rights South, and Aziz' immigrant adventure in Lorraine Adams' Harbor.

English 3351
Section 3351

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction: The Art of Memory

Jacqueline (McClean) Kolosov-Wenthe

”The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting”—Milan Kundera
“Of course I may be remembering it all wrong after, after—how many years?” –Elizabeth Bishop
“Count what was bitter and kept you awake”—Paul Celan

The focus of this course is memory.
Bound up in the study are questions of nature, identity, creativity, myth, culture, witness, representation, and (im)mortality. Crucially, memory is inextricably linked to inspiration and imagination. After all, Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory, is the mother of the classical muses. Or, to quote Toni Morrison: “Memory (the deliberate act of remembering) is a form of willed creation.” We will read voraciously in the genres of nonfiction, poetry, and fiction. The writings will be in creative nonfiction. We will rely on a xeroxed course packet for many of the readings. In addition, we'll use 2-3 books of creative nonfiction (about $14.95 each). The first is Words From the Land—writings about the natural world. The second is Brenda Miller's Season of the Body—essays dealing with memory, the body, family history, love—by one of creative nonfiction's most luminous voices.

English 3351
Section 002

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Stephen Jones

No description available.

English 3351
Section 003

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

John Poch

No description available.

English 3351
Section 004

Creative Writing

Jill Patterson

In this course, students will learn the narrative strategies for writing literary fiction. We'll read, as examples, stories from the text entitled Student Body, a collection of contemporary stories about college students and college professors. In class, we'll discuss various elements of fiction writing: viewpoint, dialogue, character development, setting, theme, etc. We will be workshopping manuscripts in class as well.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Vicki Hester

This course focuses on reading, writing, and thinking about current issues in composition for the purpose of introducing students to the many issues and research efforts that continue to shape the field of composition. While this course will build on contemporary issues in this field, there will be some historical review of composition as well. Students will read and write about successful approaches to professional writing and study successful teaching practices. Analyzing professional writing and teaching practices fosters the kind of reflection that leads to an understanding of the inner workings of the writing process. To also add to this understanding, English 3360 requires students to write often, to comment on the writings of classmates, to analyze and comment on published writings, and to discuss why some writing fails and other writing works. In other words, this is a course in both theory and practice.

We will think about theory and practice, and we will practice those theories that we study. English 3360 students will write multiple drafts for most assignments and produce a portfolio by the end of the semester according to the process theories we study during the semester. Students will practice theories of social construction as they work on group projects and provide peer commentaries for one another. By focusing on issues of theory and practice in composition, students work toward becoming members of an academic community of writers and writing teachers. Together, we will strive toward understanding what it means to have clearly defined theories and practices about writing and teaching writing—toward understanding what it means to reflect on those theories and practices, and why we should continually research to better understand the ongoing issues in teaching composition.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher.

English 3366
Section 001

Style in Technical Writing

Angela Eaton

In Style in Technical Communication, we will examine what constitutes a style, and identify characteristics of the most frequently used styles in technical and professional communication. We will study discourse communities, how they determine which styles are appropriate for which contexts, and how we as authors can determine the appropriateness of a certain style for a situation. Finally, we will learn how to create these styles in our own writing.

English 3368

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Craig Baehr

No description available.

English 3371

Linguistic Science

Mary Jane Hurst

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. Our primary objective will be to learn what language is and how language systems work. We will examine some of the main components of language – sounds, word forms, and sentence structure – and we will also investigate the principles of language change and language variation. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive, and our primary focus will be on the English language. Class meetings will be organized around a lecture-discussion format. For more information, refer to the Course Information section and other sections of Dr. Hurst's website : http://www.faculty.english.ttu.edu/hurst.

English 3381
Section 001

Literature of the Fantastic
Imagining Healing

James Whitlark

The course will study why fantasy and science fiction have become so popular, what they contribute to readers' self-actualization, how they are therapeutic, and what if their popularity continues to grow.

English 3386

Literature and Science
Biology and Gender in Women's Science Fiction

Bruce Clarke

This course offers a review of contemporary biology and an introduction to feminist science studies as context for the study of some significant female-authored works of science fiction that foreground matters of biology and gender. Microbiologist Lynn Margulis discusses the cultural background of biological science while presenting important revisions to evolutionary theory. Co-authored with her son Dorion Sagan, What is Life? works through the origins and evolution of the five living kingdoms with an emphasis on symbiotic relationships. In Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium, feminist historian of science Donna Haraway critiques a range of bioscientific topics and practices, from cloning to the human genome project. We will work through these texts while reading some acclaimed novels that use science-fictional scenarios to dramatize issues of life and death in terms of constructions of femininity and masculinity, while speculating about alternative worlds and alien bodies: Naomi Mitchison, Solution Three; Ursula K. LeGuin, The Left Hand of Darkness; Joan Slonczewski, A Door Into Ocean; and Octavia E. Butler, Lilith's Brood (aka the Xenogenesis trilogy).

English 3387
Section 001

Multicultural Literatures
Introduction to Multiethnic Short Stories

BJ Manriquez

The class will read a selection of stories from five different American ethnic or culture groups. The course is thinking, writing, and reading intensive.

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3387
Section 005

Multicultural Literatures
Introduction to Multiethnic Short Stories

BJ Manriquez

The class will read a selection of stories from five different American ethnic or culture groups. The course is thinking, writing, and reading intensive.

English 3388
Section 002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Hollywood Cinema

Michael Schoenecke

English 3388 will lay out contemporary Hollywood's most important and typical narrative strategies (which are in most respects the same as those in use during the earlier studio eras) and then to examine closely several recent films to show how these strategies are used in practice. We will discuss how films typically break down into large-scale parts, usually with carefully balanced proportions that help shape the trajectory of the narrative. We will also examine the notion of the "goal-oriented protagonist" so characteristic of classical narratives and will show how character goals often change, helping to shape the plot and indeed often marking the transitions between large-scale portions of the narrative. This class is aimed at students interested in learning how films tell stories. The class will also be useful to scriptwriters because it offers a more fine-grained account of how actual films work than do screenplay manuals.

English 3389
Section 002

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany

The Short Story will provide the student with eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context in which the form appeared. It will begin with the Classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period through the Rennaissance to the present day. The literary treatment of heroism, and passion, will be discussed. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing.

English 3390
Section 002

Literatures of the Southwest
Introduction to Multiethnic Short Stories

BJ Manriquez

The class will read a selection of stories from five different American ethnic or culture groups. The course is thinking, writing, and reading intensive.