Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2005 | 4000 Level

English 4301
Section 001

Studies in Selected Authors
Charles Dickens: The Haunted Man

Sean Grass

Perhaps no novelist of the nineteenth century in England wrote so many major novels as Charles Dickens—the man who called himself “the Inimitable” and signed his earliest works “Boz.” Most students believe that Dickens was paid by the word; to some extent, they are right. But they do not know that this literary giant was an irrevocably wounded man: scarred by childhood neglect, deeply insecure, desperately unhappy, and obsessed with achieving a level of literary success that would erase his secret pain. His works are important enough in themselves, but they are also a window onto the private identity of a human being whose life was essentially a tragedy—a series of early traumas reworked and rewritten through thirty years as England's preeminent writer of fiction.

English 4301
Section 002

Studies in Selected Authors
‘Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know': Byron and Byronism

Ann Hawkins

When Lady Caroline Lamb described Byron as ‘mad, bad, and dangerous to know,' she had no idea her description would stick. But Lamb's version of Byron as bad-boy iconoclast or sex-god informs popular images of young rebels to this day, from James Dean with his collar flipped-up to Colin Firth, whose Byronic D'Arcy wowed audiences in A&E's Pride and Prejudice. These images have become a staple of popular culture, appearing in movies like Gothic and Haunted Summer, the cult TV series Highlander, and most recently as the main character (a vampire) in Tom Holland's Lord of the Dead. What accounts for such a pervasive fame—even among those who have never read his poetry?

This course will follow the trajectory of Byron's career, tracing the roots of our modern obsession. We will begin with Byron's juvenilia in the harshly reviewed Hours of Idleness and his vitriolic satiric response in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, then move to his fame-making Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and his immensely popular Oriental tales of pirates and forbidden love. From his sorcerer Manfred and his effeminate king, Sardanapalus, we'll end with Don Juan, his “more sinned against than sinning” seducer.

English 4311
Section 001

Studies in Poetry
Twentieth-Century British Poetry

William Wenthe

This course will explore the major movements and figures in British Poetry for roughly the past hundred years. The majority of our readings will cover the rapid changes in English poetry from about 1910 to World War II, when poets were working to revise the English poetic tradition into deliberately "modern" forms. This course will explore some of the richest, most exciting, and controversial writings in our language. I do require that all students be committed to the readings in this course. The readings are by no means great in quantity, but they will demand to be read differently than one would read prose. Like 20th-century painting, the history of 20th-century poetry is largely a history of form, engaging in similar disputes between the artwork as a representation of the world, and the artwork as its own world. Thus we will be examining poems not only for what they say, but for what they do—that is, what effects, what possible meanings, are created by the formal qualities of the poem.

English 4314
Section 001

Studies in Nonfiction
Literary Biography & Autobiography

Jen Shelton

No description available.

English 4315
Section 001

Studies in Film
Film Noir

Michael Schoenecke

For the Spring 2005 term, 4315.001 will examine film noir; although some people would argue that it has always been easier to recognize film noir that to define it, we will do both. Whatever noir is, it originated in America, emerging out of a synthesis of hard-boiled fiction and German Expressionism. To gain an understanding of noir's narrative traits in film, we will consider such films as Cape Fear, Double Indemnity, The Usual Suspects, House of Games, Blade Runner, Batman, Seven, etc. The noir world is not characterized by garden parties, ties and other ceremonies of the well-to-do but by dark streets, back alleys, grungy offices (with a pint of booze in the desk drawer), desolate hotel rooms, sleazy bars and other attractions that dominate(d) the wrong side of town. As we discuss these films, we will also address why America continues to produce films that expose its cultural myths.

English 4321
Section 001

Studies in Literary Topics
Europe and Literature: From the Practical Construction of an Identity to the Theoretical Construction of a Space

Staff

Topics to be covered throughout the semester include the following:

1. The Greek construction of Europe and the myth of Europe (Aeschylus, Moschos, Tatius, painters); 2. Europe from the Middle Ages literature to 1900 (epos, Hugo, Goethe); 3. Europe during the 2Oth century: evolution through literature and philosophy (texts about the geographical and cultural limits of Europe and Preamble of the European Constitution Project); 4. Two very European writers: Cees Nooteboom and Milan Kundera; 5. Plural Europe: from the western extremities to the eastern ones (text: Jonathan S. Foer); 6. Fictional Europe: Imaginary Balkans from Ruritania to Poldevia and Molvania (Anthony Hope, Jacques Roubaud, Rob Sitch). Theory: 7. Postmodern spaces; 8. History of Spatial Representations; 9. Real Spaces, Fictional Spaces; 10. Touristic Spaces; 11. Geocriticism; 12. Conclusions.

English 4351
Section 002

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

John Poch

To apply for the course, submit three poems either via email or placing them under my office door.

No description available.

English 4374
Section 001

Senior Seminar
Literary Communities

Julie Nelson Couch

No description available.

English 4374
Section 002

Senior Seminar

Doug Crowell

No description available.

English 4368

Advanced Web Design

Craig Baehr

No description available.

English 4378
Section 001

Internship in Technical Communication

Thomas Barker

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, ENGL 3365, declared specialization in technical communication, and approval of director of technical communication.