Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2006 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

No description available.

English 2305
Section 011

Introduction to Poetry
Poetry: The Tradition

Feisal Mohamed

One critic has recently said that “poetry repeals conventions and voids traditions.” Less true words were never spoken. Perhaps no artists are more self-conscious of their operation within a tradition than poets are. This course will thus aim to provide the background in the poetic tradition that makes poetry intelligible. It will introduce students to poets ranging from Geoffrey Chaucer to Derek Walcott, with emphasis on the relationship between poetic form and meaning. We will explore the intellectual and artistic differences and similarities among the poets on the course and examine how each poet contributes to the genre.

English 2306
Section H01

Introduction to Drama - Honors
Tragically Monstrous

Marjean Purinton

“If ‘all the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players,” then we can learn much about the world by looking at its drama. In this interactive FYE course, we will explore tragedies that expose and examine the monstrosities of the human experience – actual monsters and monstrous behaviors. We will pursue such questions as: Why do these manifestations of the monstrous appear in our classic tragedies? What is tragic about the monstrous? What constitutes the tragically monstrous? What satisfaction do we derive by seeing the monstrous staged in tragedies? We will read several tragedies from Greek theatre to the contemporary stage that feature the monstrous in one form or another: Medea by Euripides, Othello by William Shakespeare, De Monfort by Joanna Baillie, A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen, The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, Trifles by Susan Glaspell, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, and Proof by David Auburn. Some of these dramas may be new to you, and some may offer you renewed readings and reflection. We will view cinematic versions of several tragedies. We will also attend a play staged at one of the Texas Tech University theatres this fall.

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Staff

No description available.

English 2307
Section H01

Introduction to Fiction - Honors

Jen Shelton

“For longer than you want to know, folks considered the marriage plot to be the most appropriate storyline for girls and young women to consume; it was also the only form women were allowed to write for many years. Within the structures of this plot, novelists like Jane Austen found ample ground for stories that delved beyond the confines of whether (and how) the heroine could get her man (or, to be strictly accurate, be gotten by him). Other writers, though, found the marriage plot profoundly inadequate for their artistic expressions – yet if these writers were women, they might also find that pressures to conform to this accepted plotline were overwhelming. All of this has ideological implications for the young girls who consume these texts, the men they marry, and women novelists.

In this course, we'll examine romance in literature, primarily in female-authored novels, to see what permutations have been possible even in highly restrictive time-periods. We'll bookend the course with two Austen novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, and we'll fill up the middle with examples of “obedient” and “resisting” marriage plot books, including novels by Bronte, Wolf, and contemporary writers. We may even read some “slash,” a form of internet fan fiction in which writers (often women) identify romantic undercurrents invisible to writers of television buddy shows like Star Trek, Starsky and Hutch, or Due South.

This course will be integrated with the LCG required in the First-Year Experience program of the Honors College; some work of the class will spill over to the LCG and some work of the LCG will filter into the classroom. This course is writing intensive, to prepare you for success in college.” from Honors College booklet, Summer/Fall 2006

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

This course will introduce students to the study of fiction using a range of American short stories and novels from the 1840s to the 1990s. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an introduction to the literary interpretation and analysis of fiction: to determine what details in a text are significant, to find and develop topics from the text, and to write analytical essays.

English 2307
Section 026

Introduction to Fiction
Against Amnesia: Fictional Returns to History

Karen Clark

In a recent interview, Nobel-Prize winning author Toni Morrison commented on what she sees as one of the most significant crises of our times—cultural amnesia: “We live in a land,” notes Morrison, “where the past is always erased […] or it's romanticized. This culture doesn't encourage dwelling on, let alone coming to terms with, the truth about the past. [As such], memory is […] in danger.” Students in this Introduction to Fiction course will explore the many ways in which contemporary writers are engaging with, using, and perhaps even changing the past as they create works of fiction which work “against amnesia,” to use Nancy J. Peterson's phrase. At the same time, students will encounter a variety of fictional texts, in a variety of forms –the novel, the short story, the fable—from a variety of places and perspectives.

English 2307
Section 027

Introduction to Fiction
“The End” in Fiction

Michael Holko

This introductory course will explore how “the end” operates as a structural and thematic plot device in narrative fiction. How does “the end” of a story mark the boundaries containing it? To what degree are “endings” obvious in the course of a story? In what way are stories about an approaching or inevitable “end” able to comment on present situations? We will approach these questions with an introduction to basic literary terms, elements of narrative fiction, and methods of textual explication. Then we will briefly examine critical and meta-fictive material to inquire into the idea of “the end” as both a sense of closure and imminence. We will spend the rest of the semester investigating how “the end” operates in, and is imagined through, various works of short fiction and novels.

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Creative Writing

Staff

No description available.

English 2388
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Film Studies

Staff

This course introduces students to the history, aesthetics, and criticism of film. More specifically, the course will survey landmark moments in the evolution in cinema and will cover foundational film concepts and reading strategies across the three major genres of avant-garde, documentary, and fictive-narrative.

English 2391
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

No description available.