Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2006 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 001

Old and Middle English Literature
Old English: Monsters, Vikings, Miracles

Brian McFadden

This course will examine Old English literature (c. 730-1066) in the context of the major events of the period, the Viking invasions and the Benedictine reforms, which began to establish the idea of England as a nation and to define it as a “self” against foreign “others.”. Genres will be Anglo-Saxon history (Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); saints' lives (Ælfric's Lives of Saints, the Life of St. Margaret) homilies and sermons (Ælfric, Wulfstan); allegory (Panther, Phoenix, Whale); riddles; heroic poetry (Beowulf, Judith, The Battle of Maldon, Dream of the Rood); elegies (The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Husband's Message, The Wife's Lament, Wulf and Eadwacer); and monster texts (The Letter of Alexander to Aristotle; Wonders of the East).

English 3302
Section 003

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Knights, Maidens & Love-Talk

Julie Couch

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the expectations genre imposes on the text. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing.

English 3304
Section 001

Medieval and Renaissance Drama

Constance Kuriyama

No description available.

English 3307
Section 001,002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature

Staff

No description available.

English 3308
Section 001

Nineteenth Century British Literature
Mid-century Transformations, 1820-1870

Ann Hawkins

The ends of the nineteenth-century--Romantic or Victorian--get the most press. But what do we call the middle? Is it Romantic or Victorian--or something else? This course takes that question as a starting point and examines a number of movements that seem to begin by being Romantic and end up Victorian. For example, how do we get from Sir Walter Scott's stories of knights and ladies to Tennyson's Morte D'Arthur or Morris's "Defense of Guinevere"? What happens with Byron's legacy of iconoclasm that leads Carlyle to proclaim, "Close thy Byron, Open thy Goethe"? And why do the Victorians like Wordsworth so much?

The course will begin with a brief primer in Romanticism (to define our terms); then we'll read through a variety of prose, poetry, drama, and non-fiction to address our central question. In particular, we'll look at disjunctions, places where the interests of the mid-nineteenth-century seem at odds with each other. We'll place, for examine, Robert Browning's narratives of passion (often gone awry), particularly in the Ring and the Book, alongside Carlyle's vision of a new social order in Sartor Resartus. We'll examine the growing literature of social protest alongside contemporary ghost or mystery stories (by Mrs. Jewsbury and others) or nonsense texts like Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. And we'll think about how the pesky "woman question"-- particularly in Barrett Browning's “Aurora Leig”-- gets played out in the middle of a century that started with Wollstonecraft and Hannah More and ends with Victoria.

English 3323
Section 002

Early American Literature
Survey

Cristobal Silva

This course is a survey of American literary history from the European conquests to the early US Republican period. Our goal will be to develop an ever-expanding notion of what constitutes American literature, and of how specific American literary traditions may have evolved into being. As a means to this end, we will continually interrogate our notions of what America is, of how writers and thinkers have tried to express what it means to be American, and of what literary critics do.

Course topics will range from the language of exploration and of colonial encounters (Columbus, De las Casas), to the major strains of New England Puritanism (Bradford, Winthrop, Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards), the meanings of American individualism and liberty (Franklin, de Crevecoeur, Equiano, Jefferson), the mythology of American exceptionalism, and the position of dissent in American ideology.

English 3324
Section 001

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey of Poetry, Fiction, and Non-fiction

John Samson

This course will survey American literature throughout the century, dividing our discussion according to the major movements of the period: Romanticisms, Slavery and the Civil War, Realism, and Naturalism. Students will read short stories by Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville; novels by Phelps, Twain, and Norris; non-fiction by Thoreau and Douglass; and works by poets throughout the century.

English 3325
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
American Modernism

Bryce Conrad

“This course covers American literature from 1900 to 1940. Also known as the modernist period, the early decades of the twentieth century are often remembered for innovation and experimentation in literary form and style. But American modernists also sought to make visible the historical and cultural landscape of their time, and their texts serve as a living record of events and phenomena such as the waning of small town America, the emergence of an urban consumer society, the impact of World War I on American life, the significance of the expatriate movement for American artists, the importance of the Harlem Renaissance for the American cultural scene, and the political challenges posed by the Great Depression. Our engagement with this rich body of literature will focus equally on form and content.

English
Section 003

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
Reading Historically

Madonne Miner

Modern and Contemporary American Literature, is supposed to survey literary works produced in America from 1900 to the present. Given the impossibility of truly surveying the incredibly rich materials written and published over one hundred and six years, we will focus primarily on texts from two periods of experimentation with literary forms and subjects: the 1920s and the 1970s/80s. We most likely will read novels by Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Cather, Pynchon, Doctorow, Morrison and others; we also will read poetry, short fiction, and a few plays.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

Utilizing the approach of Comparative Literature, this course will explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Nallund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights Movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. We will read the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Housseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. We will end the semester with the cultural collisions that produced Andre du Bus' House of Sand and Fog.

English 3351
Section 002,004

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Section 005

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

William Wenth

To take this class, you should have completed two sophomore English courses or, if English is not your major, the English requirements as specified in your major. It is not necessary to have studied poetry. It is necessary that you want to study poetry seriously: successful poetry writing means successful reading of other poets. We will do both in this course.

The classroom work will consist of intensive discussion of our own and others' poetry. As a whole, this course will require a steady commitment; for in addition to preparing for each class, you will also be writing your own poems, on your own time. The bulk of your grade will depend on how well you apply the skills learned in class to your own writing outside of class. Of course I will be available to guide you in all phases. You will be required to complete a series of poetry exercises and short (one-page) informal essays that I call “response papers,” to write original poems, and discuss poems—including your own—in class.

English 3351
Section 007

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Mathew Purdy

No description available.

English 3351
Section 011

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Diane Warner

Students in this class will learn basic poetic techniques--including alliteration, meter, simile and metaphor--by writing a new poem each week, so the best way to approach this class is to be willing to write and write and write. In the workshop environment, students will critique each other's work, offering intelligent and thoughtful advice and praise. I will make suggested assignments (forms or topics) for students who need this structure, but in general, students should write poems on topics that interest them. We will also be reading and discussing work by a variety of poets; they will be our models and our mentors.

English 3351
Section 012

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Mathew Purdy

No description available.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Staff

No description available.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher.

English 3366
Section 001

Style in Technical Writing

Kenneth Baake

Style in writing involves choosing words and sentence structures that best deliver the writer's ideas on behalf of readers. This course will fine-tune students' writing skills, consider different styles in technical communication, and assess the ways that different styles of writing convey social attitudes, ideologies, and power structures. The class also will introduce theories of style as found in Classical Greek and Roman writing handbooks.

We will approach the topic of style from a theoretical and applied perspective. Drawing from rhetorical theory, each of you will analyze existing documents and workplace writing genres for style; you will write regular style exercises and short analysis postings to the class electronic bulletin board (Web Board); you will research issues of style in the workplace, write a research paper or report and present the information to the class; and you will write an exam that covers course content. Attendance and participation will count toward your grade.

At the end of the course each of you should be able to 1) display skills in analyzing writing styles and reproducing them in your own writing; 2) display understanding of the stylistic choices we make as academic and workplace writers; 3) display an understanding of the rhetorical considerations that affect writing style; 4) demonstrate improvement in your own writing and the ability to move among different styles; and 5) contribute to the body of knowledge about technical writing style.

English 3367
Section 002

Usability Testing

Brian Still

This course introduces you to usability testing, or the practice of observing real users interacting with real things for the purpose of improving real products and services. We will divide our time between a) reading about how to do usability testing--writing test plans, conducting a user analysis, practicing facilitating, analyzing results, and so on; and b) actually conducting usability tests in our usability lab, which will involve plugging in wires, positioning microphones and cameras, shooting and editing video, practicing doing all the various roles required of a group usability test, and generally becoming comfortable with all the workings of gathering data.

English 3371
Section 001,002

Linguistic Science

Staff

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. Our primary objective is to learn what language is and how language systems work. We will first examine the main components of language – sounds, word forms, and sentence structure – and we will then investigate principles of language variation and language change. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive, and our primary focus will be on the English language. Class meetings will be organized around a lecture-discussion format.

Specific learning outcomes, assessment measures, and other information can be found at the following site: http://www.faculty.english.ttu.edu/hurst//3371f02.html.

English 3372
Section 001,002

History of the English Language

Staff

No description available.

English 3373
Section 002,003

Modern English Syntax

Daniel Siddiqi

No description available.

English 3382
Section 001

Women Writers
Women Writers of the American West

Sara Spurgeon

We will sample a variety of women's primary textual genres situated in various “Wests,” as well as critical scholarly essays. Students will be asked to think about issues such as inter-cultural exchanges of and by women, life writing, varied relationships between gender and the Western landscape, and negotiations of colonialism.

English 3385
Section 001

Shakespeare

Marliss Desens

No description available.

English 3387
Section 001,002

Multicultural Literatures
Mexican American and Chicana/o Literature

Priscilla Ybarra

No description available.

English 3387
Section 004

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3388
Section 001

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema. Sports to be examined include boxing, baseball, football, golf, and basketball.

English 3388
Section 002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema. Sports to be examined include boxing, baseball, football, golf, and basketball.

English 3389
Section 001,002

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

The Short Story will provide the student with the eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context for the form. It will begin with the classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period and the Renaissance to the present day. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing. Requirements include a creative short story written especially for this class, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and weekly quizzes on the readings. The texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, James Joyce's Dubliners, and The Longman Masters of Short Fiction (2002 edition).