Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2006 | 4000 Level

English 4300

Individual Studies in English

Staff

Course number normally used for individual/independent studies arranged between an English professor and a student. Students must have already completed a course with the instructor. The instructor is not obligated to agree to supervise the independent study. The student will normally have a topic in mind and will approach the instructor for feasibility. A form, which may be picked up in EN 211C, must be filled out and approved by the Chair of the English Department. The form is then delivered to 211C and the advisor enrolls the student. The teacher submits the grade to the Chair for posting.

English 4301
Section 001

Studies in Selected Authors

Brian McFadden

No description available.

English 4301
Section 002

Studies in Selected Authors
“I Speak for You”: Ralph Ellison and American Culture

Michael Borshuk

While a “studies in authors” course on a writer who published only one novel in his lifetime may seem peculiar, few would argue against Ralph Ellison's expansive influence in African American literature, and in American letters more broadly. Ellison's Invisible Man, for instance, with its comprehensive use of vernacular and literary sources, is inextricable from both conservative definitions of the American canon and “radical” reconsiderations of that ostensibly unified tradition. Ellison's writing is as varied and ambitious as the American culture he simultaneously idealized and criticized. To read his work in its entirety is to be engaged with multiple, seemingly contradictory visions of American identity and culture at once.

This class will study Ellison's work in various forms: his masterpiece, Invisible Man, of course, but also his early short fiction, his unfinished second novel, and his essays and cultural criticism. We will be attentive to Ellison's development as a fiction writer, observing his move from social realism and experimentation with folk forms in early stories, to a mature fusion of politics and vernacular play in later work like “Flying Home,” “King of the Bingo Game” and Invisible Man. Throughout, we will observe how Ellison's fiction embodies the dramatization of his own critical conception of American literature and culture, as articulated in his non-fiction writing. That is, we will consider how Ellison's fiction reveals his own faith in American culture's hybrid character; how it explores a distinctly American tension between formal and improvised cultural elements; and how it redresses the limited or problematic representations of non-white Americans offered by seminal “white” voices in American literature.

Finally, while we will bring a close critical attention to Ellison's engagement with American culture as a reader and writer, we will also consider his specific relationship—sometimes complementary, sometimes antagonistic—to other notable African American writers like Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Albert Murray and Amiri Baraka.

English 4311
Section 001

Studies in Poetry
Heroic Souls and Saintly Bodies: The Poems of a 1300 Manuscript Miscellany

Julie Nelson Couch

This course will immerse students in the poems of a medieval manuscript, the Bodleian Library, Laud Misc. 108. This manuscript, dated to about 1300 and written entirely in Middle English, includes a cycle of verse saints lives known as the South English Legendary, the Middle English romances, Havelok the Dane and King Horn, a poem animating the apocryphal Childhood of Christ, a verse debate between the Body and Soul, a political poem, and other examples of ‘religious' verse, including “The Three Foes of Mankind.” Paleographic and codicological evidence indicates that the texts contained within the manuscript were intentionally ordered; such a deliberate collation reveals a blurring of generic boundaries, that is the overlapping of religious, political, and fantastic modes of poetry. In this course, we will read the Laud poems and consider the interpretive implications of their original manuscript context. Using the microfiche facsimile of this manuscript, we will examine the actual manuscript layout of the poetry. We will examine intertextual relationships among the romances, saints' lives, and political poems.

English 4313
Section 001

Studies in Fiction
West of Everything: Myths of Empire in Literature and Film

Sara Spurgeon

In this course we will examine texts engaging and challenging the myth of the frontier, including works by Native American, Chicano/a, Asian American, and Anglo American writers and directors. We will be exploring these texts from a number of different angles: What did the myth of the frontier look like in the past and what shape is it assuming in American culture today? How has it been used to justify or deconstruct American ideas about conquest, colonization, and empire? How might it work to define our ideas about gender, race, class, sexuality, national identity, borders, etc.? How has it formed the genre we know today as the “Western”? How do the works of non-Anglo Westerners writing from "the other side" of the frontier reinterpret that myth? We will be doing close readings of novels, films, and theory.

English 4315
Section 001

Studies in Film
Multicultural American Cinema

Scott Baugh

Roll call: Halle Berry, Salma Hayek, Denzel Washington, and Ice Cube. Jimmy Smits, Samuel L. Jackson, Tom Hanks, and Jennifer Lopez. Jackie Chan, Tom Cruise, and Lucy Liu … and Woody Allen. These are just a few of the faces you will see in this film studies course.

In this course, students investigate the extent to which the aesthetics of film represent and express American multiculturalism. With special attention to the dynamics of “mainstream” and independent feature films, the course covers a diverse range of issues involved in the formulation of American multiculturalism in cinema, including race and ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class and socio-political status, among others. Students, then, not only practice analytical reading skills through film interpretation, but also explore and identify significant aspects of our American culture.

English 4351
Section 001

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: The Shared Terrain of Poetry and Fiction

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

Please email instructor for permission to enroll in the course.

*What can a poet learn from a fiction writer?
* What can a fiction writer learn from a poet?

These questions will be the starting points for this advanced creative writing workshop in which each student can work primarily in one genre or move as fluidly as he/she likes between poetry and fiction. Workshops will be at the center of the course, as will reading and voracious discussion. Readings will be drawn from both genres. In addition, we will read some hybrid forms such as David St. John's Faces, a novella in verse; Kim Addonizio's Jimmy & Rita, a love story in poems; and Michelle Richmond's linked story collection, The Girl in the Flyaway Dress. Over the course of the semester, each student will create a unified/linked body of work. This could be a sequence of poems or stories exploring a relationship, a history, even a memory from many angles. What if several characters commented on the same event? What if a memory was explored at different points in time including the time BEFORE it happened? Consider a sequence that brings together poems in the form of postcards (postcard as prose poem?) with stories that open up/reveal/complicate the role of the postcards within the overall work. Consider what would happen if you were to introduce the villanelle's principles of repetition into a linked group of stories. .

English 4351
Section 002

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Dennis Covington

No description available.

English 4360
Section 001

Advanced Exposition

Susan Lang

No description available.

English 4367
Section 001

Developing Instructional Materials

Kirk St. Amant

No description available.

English 4368
Section 001

Advanced Web Design

Craig Baehr

No description available.

English 4373
Section 001

Studies in Linguistics
Semantics

Min-Joo Kim

What is semantics? It's a study of meaning. What is then meaning? We seem to know what we mean by ‘meaning' but it isn't always easy to define what it is. Obviously, we use ‘meaning' in various contexts. For instance, we say ‘What do you mean by that?' when we don't understand a word, be it in English or in another language, or when we don't understand the meaning of a sentence. But we also say ‘What do you mean?' when we don't understand the other party's intention.

In this course, we will examine basic concepts in word and sentence meaning, and the way in which sentences are used and interpreted in context. More specifically, we will investigate why ‘Every man loves a woman' can be ambiguous, why ‘John is knowing Sue' is ungrammatical, why we are not actually asking a question when we say ‘Could you please pass me the salt?', and why we imply something about Mary when we say ‘Mary got pregnant and then got married,' as opposed to ‘Mary got married and then got pregnant'.

English 4374
Section 001

Senior Seminar

Doug Crowell

Please contact English undergraduate advisor for permission to enroll in the course: Suzi.Duffy@ttu.edu, (806) 742-2500 ext 254, EN 211C .

English 4374
Section 002

Senior Seminar
What Can You Do with English?

Staff

Please contact English undergraduate advisor for permission to enroll in the course: Suzi.Duffy@ttu.edu, (806) 742-2500 ext 254, EN 211C .

The subtitle for this senior seminar, "What Can You Do with English?" poses a question that is not merely meant to be rhetorical. We will reflect on what we have done as English majors, and we will explore the ways in which literature and the humanities play a vital role in our shared cultural life.

English 4378
Section 021

Internship in Technical Communication

Staff

Internship arranged with director of technical communication. Contact Dr. Thomas Barker:  thomas.barker@ttu.edu, EN 363E, (806) 742-2500