Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2006 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Section 002,005

Introduction to Poetry
The “Voice” of Poetry

Michael Holko

In Democracy, Culture and the Voice of Poetry, Robert Pinksy claims that poetry “is a vocal imagining, ultimately social but essentially individual and inward" (39). This introductory course will survey a range of poetry and explore the image of “voice” as both a social and personal utterance. We will begin with a brief introduction to basic literary terms, elements of prosody, methods of textual explication, and a concise – yet critical – inquiry into the idea of “voice”. We will then spend the semester investigating various poetic forms (such as the elegy, the sonnet, and free verse) and themes (such as love, politics, and nature) to explore how “voice” operates in poetry and how poetry works to speak within a public, and private, sphere.

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

This course will introduce students to poets ranging from Geoffrey Chaucer to Derek Walcott, with emphasis on the relationship between poetic form and meaning. We will explore the intellectual and artistic differences and similarities among the poets in the course and outline the periods and movements with which all students of poetry in English should be familiar. The chief goal of this course is to acquaint one with a broad range of major poetic works. In the process students will not only improve their knowledge of literature, but also refine skills of literary interpretation necessary to upper-division English courses, and sharpen the critical reading and writing skills beneficial to all studies in the Humanities and beyond.

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Staff

Drama traditionally has been a form of poetry and/or a means of religious expression. It is a complex literary form with its own flavor. By sampling plays from several epochs, we will look at those characteristics that make drama a distinctive genre.

English 2307
Section H01

Introduction to Fiction - Honors

John Samson

To introduce the basic forms of fiction and methods of analysis, we will initially examine short stories by two classic American authors of the mid-19th century, Edgar Allan Poe and Herman Melville. Then we will compare two novels dealing with the foundation of ranches at the beginning of the 20th century, Willa Cather's O Pioneers! And John Steinbeck's To a God Unknown. Finally, we will discuss short story collections that emphasize the diversity of American culture at the end of the 20th century: Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Sherman Alexies's The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, and Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies.

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2307
Section 005,008

Introduction to Fiction

Shital Dahal

The general objective of ENGL 2307-005 & 008 course is to acquire some of the basic skills on how to read and write about fiction. We will begin by exploring the nature of prose fiction: its elements and techniques. We will seek ways of correlating stylistics and thematics. In the first couple of weeks, the course will help equip students with tools necessary for a close and critical reading of short stories and novels. Students will learn to observe some of the formal elements of the genre of prose fiction such as setting, event, plot, character, theme, narrator, point of view, etc., and use them in their reading and writing of fiction. Toward the middle of the semester, students will learn and demonstrate the skill of interconnecting the features and use them for analytical purposes. At the end, students, as active readers, will exhibit how, by picking up one or more formal elements and by way of interpreting certain passages with reference to social and cultural issues, they can draw similarities and differences among two or more works of fiction and arrive at a meaningful conclusion and gain a larger understanding of human lives.

ENGL 2307.005 & 008 within TTU's Core Curriculum: As a Humanities course, ENGL 2307.005 & 008 will facilitate students in engaging in analytical and critical appreciation of the differences found in various types of lives depicted in the assigned works of fiction. Through reading and writing of these works of fiction, this course aims to enlarge students' knowledge of human lives, especially their differences in thoughts, values, and social and cultural codes of living.

Learning Outcome for ENGL 2307.005 & 008: Students who satisfactorily complete this course should be able to demonstrate the following, both orally and verbally:
-Recognize formal elements of fiction and observe their constitutive roles in the construction of a particular work
-Correlate structural features of fiction and thematic issues within the same work . -Draw similarities and differences between two or more works of the genre of fiction, both structurally and thematically.

English 2307
Section 011,017

Introduction to Fiction
Traumatic Fictions, Haunting Histories

Karen Clark

Thomas King asserts that “the truth about stories is that that's all we are.” The Anishinabe writer Gerald Vizenor reminds us that “you can't understand the world without telling a story.” And Leslie Marmon Silko maintains that stories “aren't just entertainment./Don't be fooled./ …You don't have anything,/if you don't have the stories.”

This course will introduce students to a variety of stories, in a variety of forms (the novel, the fable, the short story), from a variety of times, places, and cultures. For instance, we will consider stories of madness and love told by women of the Victorian period, both in England and the USA. We will explore stories of silence and oppression, as told by a contemporary South African writer as he “writes back” to the nineteenth-century classic, Robinson Crusoe. We will experience stories that try to come to terms with the horrors of the twentieth-century, especially those of World War II, and we will examine the ways in which war and collective traumas ask us to reconsider the types of stories we tell. We will also encounter a Haida/Haisla story of loss, transformation, and shapeshifters, taking place on the Pacific Northwest Coast. We will even have the opportunity to read stories told by authors who are teaching right here at Texas Tech. From a variety of perspectives, then, fiction will allow us to journey through many worlds and our journeys through this material should ultimately reveal the importance of stories—sometimes entertaining, sometimes dangerous—as they engage with, change and challenge, the political, personal, and public spheres which we inhabit. Finally, through the study of fiction, students will also have the opportunity to strengthen their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Creative Writing

Staff

”Easy reading is damn hard writing” – Nathaniel Hawthorne

This course will serve as an introduction into the art of writing, concentrating primarily on the genres of fiction and non-fiction. We will be looking at texts, not in terms of their literary significance, but instead in terms of their mechanics, i.e., What makes one story work over another? How does each author create plot, setting, characterization, etc.?

English 2371
Section 160

Language in a Multicultural America

Colleen Fitzgerald

ENGL 1301 and 1302. This is a mega-section and is not Writing Intensive. This course meets both the Humanities and the Multicultural requirements, but does not apply to the General Degree requirement in English. It does apply to the English major (depending on specialization) and the English minor.

This multiculturalism course examines the relationship of language in the U.S.A. to race, ethnicity, class, religion and gender. It also looks at American Sign Language, a manual language used by many in the Deaf Community. Specific topics include Ebonics, TexMex, Texas English, American Sign Language, Native American languages and gay and lesbian linguistics.

English 2391
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

This course will help you learn what “critical writing” in literature means and how to do it effectively. Students will examine what strategies enable close reading of a text, how to support assertions about a text using well-articulated evidence. We'll focus in fact on that word “evidence,” thinking about what constitutes evidence in a literary paper, where you find it, and how you use it to write convincing papers. The course will remind you how to find and cite sources appropriately; we'll also examine models of how other writers about literature have organized and articulated their ideas. We will also look at how to improve your writing style: how to write clear, effective sentences in well-supported paragraphs. In short, you will learn how to analyze and research a text effectively, and how to transform that analysis/research into effective, convincing, argumentative writing.