Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2006 | 3000 Level

English 3305
Section 001

British Renaissance Literature
John Milton: Poetry and Prose

Feisal Mohamed

T. S. Eliot has famously said of Milton that “of no other poet is it so difficult to consider the poetry simply as poetry, without our theological and political dispositions, conscious and unconscious, inherited or acquired, making an unlawful entry.” While we may not share Eliot's scorn for Milton in this regard, we can certainly see the truth of his statement on the inescapable presence of political and theological controversy in Milton's poetry. This course will examine in detail all of Milton's major poems and introduce students to the numerous and fascinating political and theological controversies in which he engages in his prose—his arguments for the relaxation of divorce laws, his attacks on the bishops, his criticism of state censorship, his defense of the execution of Charles I, his apologies for Cromwell's rule, and his model of an English republic.

English 3308
Section 001

Nineteenth Century British Literature
Nineteenth Century British Literature

Sean Grass

This course will introduce you to the major social, cultural, and literary events of the Victorian period in England. As Dickens wrote in A Tale of Two Cities, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”—a remark that really is true of life during 1837-1901, the sixty-four years during which Queen Victoria ruled. The Victorians gave us Dickens and Darwin, railroads and public schools, and key expansions of voting rights, personal freedoms, literacy, and social opportunity. They also lived during a time when rapid urbanization and industrialization were destroying England's old agrarian society and driving the lower classes to poverty, homelessness, crime, and despair. Literature is a window upon this complicated world, and we shall use our texts to see into Victorians' secrets: the material, mental, and even sexual truths that shaped the Victorian age.

English 3309
Section 001,002

Modern and Contemporary British Literature
Modernism

Jen Shelton

This course will focus on the first part of the 20th century, sampling texts by Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Eliot, and Beckett. Theoretical readings will underpin our analysis of cultural, historic and aesthetic characteristics of modernity. The class will include reading of poetry, prose fiction, and drama.

English 3323
Section 001,002

Early American Literature
Survey

Cristobal Silva

This course is a survey of American literary history from the European conquests to the early US Republican period. Our goal will be to develop an ever-expanding notion of what constitutes American literature, and of how specific American literary traditions may have evolved into being. As a means to this end, we will continually interrogate our notions of what America is, of how writers and thinkers have tried to express what it means to be American, and of what literary critics do. Course topics will range from the language of exploration and of colonial encounters (Columbus, De las Casas), to the major strains of New England Puritanism (Bradford, Winthrop, Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards), the meanings of American individualism and liberty (Franklin, de Crevecoeur, Equiano, Jefferson), the mythology of American exceptionalism, and the position of dissent in American ideology.

English 3324
Multiple Sections

Nineteenth Century American Literature

Staff

The course will survey poetry and fiction of the period, beginning with traditional poetry of the early century, then proceeding to the American Renaissance and continuing with literature of the post-Civil War period. Lectures on literary history will be combined with discussions of individual texts.

English 3325
Section 001,002

Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Doug Crowell

No description available.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

Utilizing the approach of Comparative Literature, this course will explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Nallund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights Movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. We will read the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Housseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. We will end the semester with the cultural collisions that produced Andre du Bus' House of Sand and Fog.

English 3351
Section 006,007

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

We will study the craft of poetry writing through the close reading of poems by writers from the U.S. and around the globe. Come prepared to read deeply and extensively, discuss the workings of the poems we read, write about and critique the poems of others, and compose and revise your own poems.

English 3351
Section 009

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

John Poch

In this class, we will write poems, and much of the writing we will perform in this class will be mimetic. In other words, we will give close readings to specific poems, and then we will attempt to imitate some of the successful structures and elements that these writers use. I am a believer in writing as a process (revise, revise, revise) and I hope you will be a believer, too. In any art, the student learns by exercises and steps. Not all of these exercises will be your cup of tea, but some of them may allow you to become a little more nimble and to uncover aspects of your writing you hadn't considered prior to this class.

English 3351
Section 012,013

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Toni Jensen

No description available.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Vicki Hester

This course focuses on reading, writing, and thinking about current issues in composition for the purpose of introducing students to the concerns and research efforts that continue to shape the field of composition. While this course will build on contemporary issues in this field, there will be some historical review of composition as well. Students will read and write about successful approaches to professional writing and study successful teaching practices. Analyzing professional writing and teaching practices fosters the kind of reflection that leads to an understanding of the inner workings of writing processes. To add to this understanding, English 3360 requires students to write often, to comment on the writings of classmates, to analyze and comment on published writings, and to discuss why some writing fails and other writing works. In other words, this course looks at both theory and practice. We will think about theory and practice, and we will practice those theories that we study. English 3360 students write multiple drafts for most assignments, and each student will produce a portfolio during this semester. Practicing theories of social construction, students will work on group projects and provide peer commentaries for one another. By focusing on issues of theory and practice in composition, students work toward becoming members of an academic community of writers and writing teachers. Together, we will strive toward understanding what it means to have clearly defined theories and practices about writing and teaching writing—toward understanding what it means to reflect on those theories and practices, and why we should continually research to better understand the ongoing issues in teaching composition.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career.

English3368
Section 001

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information
Building & Deploying Web Sites for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

Brian Still

English 3368 is a beginning web design course. To prepare students for service as technical communicators (possibly designing web sites) in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), this course provides students with a well-rounded grasp of web design fundamentals, tools, and concepts, including HTML, Javascript, Cascading Style Sheets, XML/XHTML, site navigation & structure, design best practices, usability, accessibility, forms, data-driven content (SQL), and possibly (should time allow) server-side scripting, i.e. PHP. At the conclusion of the course, students will know how, working primarily with Macromedia Dreamweaver as a design platform, to assess, build, test, and deploy a web site. In addition to an exam that covers Internet history, terms, browser types, design styles/approaches, etc., students will also be required to complete weekly tasks covering a range of fundamental design skills (i.e. CSS, XML/XHTML, Javascript, Dynamic Server-Side Scripting such as PHP), participate in a course Wiki, and design (or redesign) a web site for a client.

English 3369
Section 001

Information Design

Laura Palmer

This class will teach students the basics of information design as it relates to the creation of effective print documents. Included in the course will be the principles of graphic design including colour theory, typography, digital image manipulation, document design (conceptual and physical), layout and the mechanics of commercial printing. Projects will include both short and long document design (newsletters, brochures, mini-manual) and will vary in the use of text and image. Elements of project costing/management will be discussed and the course will be directed towards producing digital files ready for commercial printing. Ultimately, the goal of ENGL 3369 is to have students create portfolio pieces (print and online) suitable for job interviews. Theories of design and major influences in the design field will be included throughout the semester. Software that may be covered in the class includes products from Adobe's “Creative Suite” (CS): InDesign, PhotoShop and, if time permits, Illustrator.

English 3382
Section 001

Women Writers

Jennifer Frangos

No description available.

English 3384
Section 001

Religion and Literature
Between Heaven and Hell

James Whitlark

Visions of other realms of being—blissful, terrifying, or simply disquieting—flow from religion into literature. This course will focus on the frontiers between these realms and our own in literature influenced by Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and other faiths.

English 3386
Section 001

Literature and Science
Studies in Popular Scientific Writing

Bruce Clarke

This course will survey a range of nonfiction works written by scientists and science journalists in the last thirty years. In the process, students will learn some of the recent developments in science, technology, and mathematics. But our main focus will be on the literary issues raised by these writings. How do these authors explain scientific matters to non-scientists in ways that are engaging and effective? How do their uses of literary and rhetorical devices such as narrative techniques, figurative devices, interviews, and conversational formats affect and influence their audiences? In what ways do these authors frame scientific knowledge so that it touches other important issues in society, politics, and culture?

English 3387
Section 001,002

Multicultural Literatures
From Mammy to Lil' Kim

Shelia Collins

This course will explore the myriad ways African Americans define their culture and identity through the study literature, movies, and music written, produced, and performed by African Americas. We will cover a wide range of texts beginning with the slave narrative of the nineteenth century and ending with writings, music, and movies influenced by hip hop culture of our present day. Through our study of writers like Charles Chesnutt and rappers such as the Notorious B.I.G., we will examine how African Americans critique, challenge, and contest mainstream depictions of blackness through their writing. The course discussion will be guided by the following topics and questions: to what extent do the historical, political, and social events of the past 150 years impact and shape the African-American literary tradition; and what is African-American literature, and how does it fit in into American tradition as a whole?

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3387
Section 004

Multicultural Literatures
A Critical Race Perspective

Yuan Shu

This course investigates multicultural literatures of America in terms of critical race theory and comparative ethnic studies. We begin by asking the questions of what race means and why it still matters in our culture and society today. In reading literary works by African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Latino/as diachronically, we discuss how race and ethnicity have been constructed and what impact such construction has produced upon racial minorities. Moreover, we also examine racial issues synchronically as articulated in the literary works, focusing on affirmative action, immigration and border crossing, the model minority myth, as well as the Southwest as a site of cultural encounters. We conclude by rethinking the existing racial categories and reflecting upon the possibility of a post-ethnic future.

English 3388
Section 001,002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative

Scott Baugh

No description available.

English 3389
Section 003,004

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

The Short Story will provide the student with the eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context for the form. It will begin with the classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period and the Renaissance to the present day. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing. Requirements include a creative short story written especially for this class, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and weekly quizzes on the readings. The texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, James Joyce's Dubliners, and The Longman Masters of Short Fiction (2002 edition).

English 3389
Section 005

Short Story

Wendell Aycock

English 3389 is designed to explore the genre of the short story. We will begin by looking at some nineteenth-century examples and trying to see how they reflect the varying tastes of their eras and why they are still regarded as being excellent examples of the genre. After we move to the twentieth century, we will examine topics or themes that have interested short story writers. We will determine what topics or themes are particularly well suited to the short story. We will study stories from various countries and try to determine what is distinctive about the genre. As time permits, we will see how some short stories have been changed into films. Although we will read short stories written by a number of authors, we will also spend some time reading the works of Guy De Maupassant and Sherwood Anderson. In addition, we will devote some time to reading Latin American short stories.

English 3390
Section 002

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

No description available.