Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2006 | 4000 Level

English 4300

Individual Studies in English

Staff

Course number normally used for individual/independent studies arranged between an English professor and a student. Students must have already completed a course with the instructor. The instructor is not obligated to agree to supervise the independent study. The student will normally have a topic in mind and will approach the instructor for feasibility. A form, which may be picked up in EN 211C, must be filled out and approved by the Chair of the English Department. The form is then delivered to 211C and the advisor enrolls the student. The teacher submits the grade to the Chair for posting.

English 4300
Section

Individual Studies in English: ESL/Literacy Internship

Colleen Fitzgerald

There is a critical need for English as a Second Language (ESL) and literacy instruction in the Lubbock area. This internship gives students the opportunity to contribute to the local community by serving as ESL/Literacy interns. Students will also learn more about linguistics and the practice of teaching. Students will meet for the equivalent of 1 hour and 20 minutes a week of classroom time with their TTU professor. Some of this will be in mandatory crash training sessions at the beginning of the semester. Students will also spend 3-4 hours of time as ESL/literacy interns in classrooms where they are paired with graduate students or other experienced teachers. Students will keep a weekly journal, write a final paper or portfolio (research or reflective or pedagogical, or some appropriate combination), and complete required readings and group discussions. This internship offers a great way to contribute to our community, to work on the craft of teaching, to experience firsthand what many learn in linguistics classes, and to work for a more just and equitable society.

English 4301
Section 001

Studies in Selected Authors
Shakespeare's English History Plays

Marliss Desens

From 1399, when Henry Bolingbroke became Henry IV by deposing his cousin, Richard II, until 1475, when Richard III was killed at the battle of Bosworth Field by forces under the command of Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, England was in a period of repeated rebellion and civil war. Indeed, it was not always clear who was the legitimate king. The young Shakespeare first explored the reigns of Henry VI and Richard III; he then went back to the start and dramatized those of Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V. Although over one hundred years had passed since the end of those wars, the memory of them continued to haunt and to shape the English mind, particularly in light of the religious upheavals begun by Henry VIII and continued by others through the reigns of Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I. Shakespeare explores these upheavals in King John and Henry VIII. For Renaissance audiences, history was not just the events of the past; it was a means of exploring the present. In this class, we will read all of Shakespeare's English history plays and explore the political, social, and religious issues that emerge. Students are permitted no more than 4 absences.

English 4311
Section 001

Studies in Poetry
Lyric Love Poetry

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

No description available.

English 4312
Section 002

Studies in Drama
British Romantic Drama

Marjean Purinton

After more than a decade of recovering and recontextualizing Romantic Drama in Great Britain, we have come to recognize the central role that drama played during the British Romantic period (1780-1830). Romantic Drama, staged and read, was the most popular medium, crossing class, national, and gender divisions, as well as a serious literary form written by the period's major writers. Manifested in diverse ways (melodrama, gothic, verse drama, opera, pantomime, puppet shows, children's drama, monodrama, tragedy, comedy, for example), Romantic Drama performed, reflected, and influenced the political, social, and cultural issues of its day. The Licensing Act of 1737, granting patents to the Royal Theatres of Drury Lane, Covenant Garden, and the Haymarket, and the Lord Chamberlain's censorship, willingness to grant licenses, meant that playwrights had to be clever in their stagings of controversial and taboo subjects.

In this course, we will examine diverse plays from the period as negotiations of theatrical politics. We will look at performative aspects of Romantic Drama, including the role of the actor, the design of the stages, non-dramatic performances, such as itinerant medicine shows, and private theatricals. We will consider the thematic and dramaturgical handling of the revolutionary and changing Romantic culture from which its drama emanated. We will recontextualize the ways in which Romantic Drama engaged with the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries as British society became increasingly democratized, commercialized, and bourgeoisie. We will discover that the theatre as a site for performing and playwriting was particularly problematic for women.

Come to this seminar prepared to engage in interactive learning, willing to explore all dimensions of Romantic Drama as reading and performing texts, as stage spectacles, as serious commentary on the period. Because my pedagogy and scholarship are informed by feminism and feminist theory, you will encounter decentralized authority in this seminar and an invitation to participate in your own learning/discovery process, your own meaning-making knowledge.

English 4313
Section 001

Studies in Fiction
Origins of the English Novel

Jennifer Frangos

No description available.

English 4351
Section 001

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Stephen Jones

Being ‘advanced' fiction writing, what we'll do in here is simply write a lot of quality stories. Depending on class size, between three and five, with a bigger project as well—usually a novel.

English 4351
Section 002

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

William Wenthe

No description available.

English 4365
Section 001

Special Topics in Technical Communication
Rhetorical Criticism

Sean Zdenek

Our world is replete with persuasive texts. Political speeches, popular narratives, email messages, advertisements, TV shows, even casual interactions with friends and family. The list is endless. Buy this! Choose this lifestyle! Oppose this political candidate! The appeals are sometimes overt and aggressive. But more often, they are subtle, so subtle that we may not even be aware that we've been persuaded by them. It is for this reason that we need a set of flexible tools for understanding how texts persuade.

Rhetoric is power. To be persuasive is to shape the minds and actions of your audience. In this course, we'll explore the sources and expressions of that power. How are texts persuasive even when they seem to be innocent, factual, and not rhetorical at all? What rhetorical strategies are at work in the texts that define our daily lives? How can we be more critical consumers of the rhetorics around us? How can we more effectively reach and persuade the audiences who consume our own written texts? To answer these questions, we'll explore a number of methods of text analysis and rhetorical criticism: traditional, metaphoric, narrative, ideological, feminist, critical, constitutive, linguistic discourse analysis, Burkean, genre, framing, content analysis, intertextual, and situational.

English 4365
Section 002

Special Topics in Technical Communication
Legal Writing

Kirk St. Amant

This course introduces students to various practices, concepts, and skills related to legal writing. Through a mixture of lectures, discussions, in-class exercises, and graded assignments, students will gain an understanding of the concepts and skills involved in creating legal documents and in presenting written legal information to a variety of audiences. This multi-part approach will also help students learn how to apply these concepts and skills in a variety of situations.

Course Objectives: Students will gain an understanding of how to

-Present legal information, ideas, and concepts to a variety of audiences
-Construct effective, logical arguments based on research
-Identify faulty or flawed written arguments and understand how to counter them
-Address legal requirements when preparing written materials for various readers
-Create documents according to specific legal guidelines
-Work with legal professionals to design effective written materials
-Conduct focused research on different legal topics
-Understand the uses and the objectives of different legal genres and documents

English 4366
Section 001

Technical and Professional Editing

Angela Eaton

In this class, you will learn how to edit technical documents, from proofreading for errors at the surface to ensuring that the document contains appropriate content, organization, and visuals for its audiences. Students will also learn how to use traditional editing marks, editing functions within word processors, and principles of layout and design.

English 4373
Section 001

Studies in Linguistics
Languages of the World

Min-Joo Kim

There is increasing evidence that languages of the world do not vary at random, and language variation follows certain identifiable patterns. In this course, we aim to address the following questions:

(i) How are languages of the world different from each other?
(ii) How are they similar to each other?
(iii) Do the different ways in which the languages package information cause speakers to pay attention to different aspects of their worlds?
(iv) Are there hidden dimensions in English grammar that are openly expressed in other languages?
(v) Are unrelated languages like English and Korean really just two different ways of speaking the same language?

We will address these questions by examining several patterns of structural variation across languages. In particular, we will be interested to investigate how geographic proximity influences the structure of a language and yet how certain core linguistic properties hold of languages regardless of their geographical closeness. For this reason, this course will serve as an introduction to language typology and linguistic universals.

English 4374
Section 001

Senior Seminar

Doug Crowell

No description available.

English 4374
Section 002

Senior Seminar
Literary Communities

Julie Nelson Couch

This seminar constitutes the capstone course for English Literature & Language and Teacher Certification Majors. We will explore the diverse and multiple literary communities in which you will conduct your professional, vocational, and/or graduate work. We will discover what opportunities exist for graduates with a Bachelor's degree in English, whether you pursue teaching, graduate school, community service, publishing and editing, business, or government work. As we review and synthesize your undergraduate knowledge and experiences in English, we will interrogate cultural, pedagogical, and practical implications of what it means to contribute to literary communities. This course will engender critical thinking about where you have come and where you intend to go with your major in English. We will attempt to create a literary community within this class, enjoying the intellectual exchange that is excited by curiosity and reading. We will benefit from guest speakers and from direct experience with literary communities in our local area.

English 4374
Section 003

Senior Seminar

Bryce Conrad

No description available.

English 4378
Section 001

Internship in Technical Communication

Thomas Barker

Internship arranged with director of technical communication. Contact Dr. Thomas Barker (thomas.barker@ttu.edu, EN 363E, 742-2501)

English 4380
Section 002

Professional Issues in Technical Communication

Kirk St.Amant

No description available.