Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2007 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 001

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English: Epic and Romance

Brian McFadden

This course will examine the growth of romance in the Middle English period and how the ideals of chivalry and courtly love grew out of and distinguished themselves from the comitatus ideal of Anglo-Saxon literature. After a brief overview of the history of the English Middle Ages, we will examine the theoretical distinctions between epic and the romance, the epic hero vs. the romantic hero (i.e. the thegn vs. the knight), the adaptation of religious ideals to the genres of epic and romance, and the rise of mercantilism and decline of knighthood as depicted in Chaucer and Malory. Note: several of the texts will be read in the original Middle English (we'll build up to those), but the most difficult texts will be read in translation.

English 3307
Section 001

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature
Poetry of the Eighteenth Century

Jennifer Snead

This course is a survey of poets writing, and poetry written, in Britain during the eighteenth century, between the Restoration and the late 1780s. Through reading and discussion of the work of poets from Pomfret to Cowper and Egerton to Seward, the class will center on a number of issues endemic to writers and writing of the period: prosody and poetic form; popular literacy and the expansion of the market for print; gender; class; concepts of cultural productions as “high” or “low”; poetry as a form of opposition or protest; poetry as a force for social change.

English 3308
Section 001

Nineteenth Century British Literature
The Weird Nineteenth Century

Bruce Clarke

During the nineteenth century, at the forefront of modern science and the industrial revolution, Great Britain consolidated its global empire. While it enjoyed the highest living standard in the world, disparities of income and opportunity were also extreme. Imperial forces abroad clashed with social tensions at home. The high- and low-lights of nineteenth-century “progress” threw many peculiar shadows. The British literary works we will read this semester captured a number of those darker hues: a misunderstood monster pieced together from cadavers, an archaic god revolting against his divine oppressor, a girl who encounters a smoking caterpillar and a murderous queen, a land where religious services occur in banks and the sick are sent to prison, a scientist who transforms himself into a pervert, a scientist who hunts vampires through hypnosis, a scientist who returns from the far future and then goes back for good, and a colonial adventurer who puts shrunken heads on his fence posts. We will read most of these works in Broadview Literary Text editions for their generous supplements detailing literary, historical, and intellectual contexts. As we move chronologically through the syllabus, we will build an informed picture of the wider culture producing these weird tales of the fantastic, wondrous, and horrendous.

English 3309
Section 001,002

Modern and Contemporary British Literature
Coloring the Isles: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in British Caribbean Literature

Kanika Batra

When the SS Empire Windrush brought the first wave of Caribbean migrants to Britain in 1948, the country was not prepared for their arrival. These migrants were denied equal opportunities in employment, housing, healthcare, education, and other amenities upon their arrival in Britain, thus exposing the fraudulence of Britain's claims of equal citizenship to people in its Caribbean colonies. Successive waves of migrations from Britain's former colonies in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean over the next decade effectively led to “coloring” the British isles, constituting what has been humorously labeled “colonization in reverse” by the Jamaican poet Louise Bennett. Experiences of alienation, racism, nostalgia for home combined with a realization that going back was difficult, and often impossible, made many immigrants turn to history to explain their presence in this country.

People of color became victims of a more strident form of racism during the 1970s when Britain effectively closed the doors to migrants by introducing stringent anti-immigration laws. At about the same time second-generation migrants were asserting a Black British identity through an adaptation of their African, Asian, and Caribbean inheritances to the British context. Music, festivals, fashion, and literature were the primary forms of expression of this generation that defiantly refused to be relegated to second-class citizenship. Though a composite “Black” identity emerged in response to racism and marginalization, it often splintered on the faultlines of geographical origin, class, gender, and sexuality. The creative and critical discourse emerging out of this cultural and political assertion, illustrated with a special emphasis on the Caribbean diaspora in Britain, is the subject of this course.

English 3324
Section 001,002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Realism in the Novel

John Samson

The course will examine the literary movement, Realism, which dominated the last half of the century and found its most significant expression in the novel. In seeking to represent American society in realistic terms, novelists tended to focus on two major issues, social class and gender roles, and our reading and discussion will center on these issues.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany-Ransdell

Utilizing the approach of Comparative Literature, this course will explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Nallund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights Movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. We will read the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Housseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. We will end the semester with the cultural collisions that produced Andre du Bus' House of Sand and Fog.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Section 014

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Diane Warner

This will be a creative writing workshop for poetry. Students will write, read and critique each other's work. Students will also be assigned poems and chapters for the text. This is a writing intensive class.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Kevin Garrison

No description available.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher.

English 3366
Section 002

Style in Technical Writing

Rebecca Rickly

No description available.

English 3367
Section 001

Usability Testing

Thomas Barker

No description available.

English 3371
Section 004,005

Linguistic Science

Jay Williams

No description available.

English 3372
Section 001

History of the English Language

Brian McFadden

This course will examine the development of the English language from its origins in Anglo-Saxon England through changes in the later medieval and Early Modern periods to the attempts to codify the language in the eighteenth century and the development of modern language study in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine both the internal history (the linguistic changes that occur within the language over time) and the external history (the effects of social and political events on the language) of English in order to answer such questions as: Why do English words often resemble words from other languages? Why are there so many “irregular” verbs in English? Why don't we spell words as they sound? Why don't we split infinitives or put a preposition at the end of a sentence when other Germanic languages do? We will also examine contemporary issues in English to see how the language has implications for our political and social lives. We will also learn to use online tools such as the Oxford English Dictionary and the Dictionary of Old English Corpus to assist in linguistic and literary research.

English 3373
Section 003

Modern English Syntax

Pritha Chandra

This course provides an outline of the structure and usage of Modern American English. We will cover the following topics: basic word structures, parts of speech, sentence types, prescriptive versus descriptive approaches to English grammar and stylistic and dialectal variations.

English 3382
Section 3382

Women Writers
The Bluestocking Circle

Jennifer Snead

This seminar explores the writings and ideologies of the “Bluestocking Circle” of the mid- to late-eighteenth century. A group of writers and intellectuals who originally gathered for conversation and exchange in the 1750s and 60s in the salons of educated women like Elizabeth Montagu, Frances Boscawen, and Elizabeth Vesey, the Bluestockings believed in intellectual rather than social merit, polite sociability, and equality between the sexes. The term “bluestocking” itself originally referred to the blue worsted stockings worn by seventeenth and eighteenth-century men for informal occasions, and it became both symbol and metaphor for the group's informality and sense of equality among its members. Throughout the second half of the eighteenth century, the Bluestockings wrote and published poems, novels, plays, essays, translations, and reams of letters – especially among and by the prominent women in the group. Later in the century, however, the term “bluestocking” gradually took on the meaning it retains today: a derogatory epithet for an intellectual, socially privileged, and conservative woman.

In this class, we'll read the writings of many of the best-known women writers of the Bluestocking circle, including Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Elizabeth Carter, Sarah Fielding, and Hannah More, exploring their relationships with each other and with the public, print culture that they participated in. We'll also dip into the writings that constituted the “Bluestocking backlash” of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, including satires on intellectual women by Frances Burney, Richard Polwhele, Thomas Moore, and Lord Byron. What did it mean to be a public female intellectual during the second half of the eighteenth century? What kinds of issues were at stake? What risks, and what gains, did it involve? And in what relationship do these early women writers stand to the development of feminism and feminist thought?

English 3387
Section 001,002

Multicultural Literatures
Chicana/o Cultural Production

Priscilla Ybarra

This course tours Mexican American Literature and Chicana and Chicano cultural production, and falls into three units: Early Mexican America (from 1848), Emergence of Chicana/o Writing, and Contemporary Chicana/o Cultural Production. Course material draws from various genres and historical periods to sketch the rich contribution that Mexican American and Chicana/o creative voices and lived experiences lend to U.S. and global culture. Students will write two research papers, lead a class discussion, complete regularly scheduled reading quizzes, and participate in regular classroom discussion.

English 3388
Section 001

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Cinematic Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema. Sports to be examined include baseball, basketball, boxing, football, golf, and others.

English 3388
Section 002,003

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
(Neo) Narratives

Scott Baugh

This course serves as an introduction to film studies. A special aim is to examine traditional and not-so-traditional movie narratives. Students will actively “read,” discuss, and write about a representative sample of “neo-narratives.” Students will work on developing a vocabulary of cinematic terms and concepts and achieving competency in interpreting and communicating their understanding of film.

English 3389
Section H01

Short Story - Honors
Other People's Lives: A World of Short Stories

Wendell Aycock

English 3389 is designed to explore the genre of the short story. We will begin our study of the genre by looking at some nineteenth-century examples and trying to see how they reflect the varying tastes of their eras and why they are still regarded as being excellent examples of the genre. After we move on to consider twentieth-century short stories, we will examine topics or themes that have interested short story writers. In our study of the short story, we will read works from various countries and try to determine what themes and topics are particularly well suited to the genre. We will, from time to time, ask what is distinctive about the short story. As time permits, we will see how some short stories have been changed into films and examine some methods of teaching the short story. Although we will read short stories written by a number of authors, we will also spend some time upon the works of Guy De Maupassant and Sherwood Anderson. In addition, we will devote some time to reading Latin American short stories.

English 3389
Section 004

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Staff

The Short Story will provide the student with the eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context for the form. It will begin with the classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period and the Renaissance to the present day. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing. Requirements include a creative short story written especially for this class, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and weekly quizzes on the readings. The texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, James Joyce's Dubliners, and The Longman Masters of Short Fiction (2002 edition).