Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2007 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

No description available.

English 2305
Section 009,011

Introduction to Poetry
The "Voice" of Poetry

Michael Holko

In “Democracy, Culture and the Voice of Poetry,” Robert Pinsky claims that poetry “is a vocal imagining, ultimately social but essentially individual and inward” (39). This introductory course will survey a range of poetry and explore the image of “voice” as both a social and personal utterance. We will begin with a brief introduction to basic literary terms, elements of prosody, methods of textual explication and comparative analysis, and a concise – yet critical – inquiry into the idea of “voice.” We will then spend the semester investigating various poetic forms (such as the elegy, the sonnet, and free verse) and themes (such as love, politics, and war) to explore how “voice” operates in poetry and how poetry works to speak within public and private spheres.

English 2305
Section 013

Introduction to Poetry
Matter and Manner

Jennifer Snead

Through a variety of British and American poems, from a broad range of historical moments, this course will introduce its participants to the pleasures and perils of reading, and writing about, poetry. Our focus throughout the semester will be on prosody: the study of a poem's form, metrical composition, rhythm, and/or rhyme scheme. From Donne to Dunn, Marvell to Merrill, Shakespeare to Sexton, we'll investigate how a poem's manner (i.e. the way in which it is written) interacts with a poem's matter (its topic, contents, or subject).

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Staff

No description available.

English 2307
Section 007,010

Introduction to Fiction
Fiction: Repetition of the Same with Difference

Staff

The course covers a wide range of stories and novels (check the list below). Students will begin the semester by learning to observe some of the formal elements of the genre of prose fiction such as setting, event, plot, character, theme, narrator, point of view, etc., and use them in their reading and writing of fiction. The course will facilitate students in engaging in analytical and critical appreciation of the differences found in various types of lives depicted in the assigned works of fiction. Through writing about and reading these works of fiction, students will enlarge their knowledge of human differences in thoughts, values, and social and cultural codes of living. To gain an ability to appreciate differences, students will observe the repetition of the same in various configurations. .

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2307
Section 021,025

Introduction to Fiction
Against Amnesia: Fictional Returns to History

Karen Clark

In a recent interview, Nobel-Prize winning author Toni Morrison commented on what she sees as one of the most significant crises of our times—cultural amnesia: “We live in a land,” notes Morrison, “where the past is always erased […] or it's romanticized. This culture doesn't encourage dwelling on, let alone coming to terms with, the truth about the past. [As such], memory is […] in danger.” Students in this Introduction to Fiction course will explore the many ways in which contemporary writers are engaging with, using, and perhaps even changing the past as they create works of fiction which work “against amnesia,” to use Nancy J. Peterson's phrase. At the same time, students will encounter a variety of fictional texts, in a variety of forms – the novel, the short story, the fable—from a variety of places and perspectives. Students will also work to strengthen their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

English 2308
H01

Introduction to Nonfiction - Honors

Dennis Covington

You will need to contact the Honors College to enroll in the course.

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Creative Writing
Creative Nonfiction and Poetry

Staff

An introduction to techniques for writing creative nonfiction and poetry. The class will emphasize writing guided by representative readings from each genre.

English 2351
Section 005,007

Introduction to Creative Writing
Writing your life, writing fiction

Staff

So much of our writing, whether nonfiction or fiction, comes from personal experience, pulled from our lives, borrowed from the lives of others. This course examines the similarities and differences between memoir and fiction, and the course is divided between those two genres. In what way can we use fictional techniques to tell our personal stories, and how do writers steal good moments from life to craft into fiction? What are some of the ethical concerns? What part does creativity and craft play in harnessing facts into fiction, and in exposing truth in fiction? Students will engage in writing both memoir and fiction. This is primarily an introduction to creative writing, so the emphasis will be on creativity and exercises.

English 2351
Section 015

Introduction to Creative Writing
Poetry and the Short Story

Richard Pierce

Students will write poems, a short story, and response papers to reading assignments. Students will read and analyze poetry and short fiction and receive a firm grounding in the basic elements of both genres.

English 2388
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Film Studies

Staff No description available. Please contact teacher.

English 2391
Section 001,002

Introduction to Critical Writing

Karen Keck

What does it take to understand a text? Although no definitive answer can be reached, we will explore possible answers as we read fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and drama; we will also look at common terms used in discussing texts.