Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2007 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 001,002

Old and Middle English Literature
Old English: Monsters, Vikings, Miracles

Brian McFadden

This course will examine Old English literature (c. 730-1066) in the context of the major events of the period, the Viking invasions and the Benedictine reforms, which began to establish the idea of England as a nation and to define it as a “self” against foreign “others.”. Genres will be Anglo-Saxon history (Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); saints' lives (Ælfric's Lives of Saints, the Life of St. Margaret) homilies and sermons (Ælfric, Wulfstan); allegory (Panther, Phoenix, Whale); riddles; heroic poetry (Beowulf, Judith, The Battle of Maldon, Dream of the Rood); elegies (The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Husband's Message, The Wife's Lament, Wulf and Eadwacer); and monster texts (The Letter of Alexander to Aristotle; Wonders of the East). We will also examine several Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts (Hali Meiðhad, Lanval, the Bayeux Tapestry, and some romances) to examine how the genres changed in England after the Norman Conquest.

English 3307
Section 001

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature
Readers, Contexts, Communities

Jennifer Snead

This course is a survey of British literature written between 1660 and 1800, spanning a broad variety of authors and genres. Throughout the semester, we'll read poetry, prose, drama, and instances of that upstart genre, the novel. We'll sample the work of writers from Grub Street to Whitehall, from London garret to country estate. During the Restoration and the eighteenth century in Britain, literacy and the market for the printed word increased vastly; our focus in this survey will be on how readers and writers defined or attempted to define themselves against the backdrop of this rapidly expanding audience and market for print. Along the way we'll also discuss how each of the texts we read fits in to current scholarly conversations and debates about eighteenth century British literature and culture.

English 3307
Section 002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature
England and the New World

Jennifer Frangos

From the colonization of Virginia in the 1580s to the American Revolutionary War (1775-83), the American colonies were a part of the British Empire; thus, to some degree, our separation of Early American and Eighteenth-Century British literatures is an arbitrary and anachronistic one. In order to explore the shared intellectual, cultural, and literary histories of England and the United States, ENGL 3323 and ENGL 3307 will be taught together during the Spring semester of 2007. One of our central aims will be to think about how this dual approach to literary history changes our understanding of both Early America and Eighteenth-century Britain.

Focusing on what has come to be known as the Transatlantic World, we will read canonical and non-canonical materials from the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We will interrogate basic convergences and divergences between these closest of nations by examining the circulation of capital and print culture, the emergence of race and gender as categories of identity, the evolution of the democratic republic in the eighteenth-century, and the mutual impact that the Old and New Worlds had in shaping each other's literary imaginations.

English 3323
Section 002

Early American Literature
America and the Old World

Cristobal Silva

From the colonization of Virginia in the 1580s to the American Revolutionary War (1775-83), the American colonies were a part of the British Empire; thus, to some degree, our separation of Early American and Eighteenth-Century British literatures is an arbitrary and anachronistic one. In order to explore the shared intellectual, cultural, and literary histories of England and the United States, ENGL 3323 and ENGL 3307 will be taught together during the Spring semester of 2007. One of our central aims will be to think about how this dual approach to literary history changes our understanding of both Early America and Eighteenth-century Britain. Focusing on what has come to be known as the Transatlantic World, we will read canonical and non-canonical materials from the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We will interrogate basic convergences and divergences between these closest of nations by examining the circulation of capital and print culture, the emergence of race and gender as categories of identity, the evolution of the democratic republic in the eighteenth-century, and the mutual impact that the Old and New Worlds had in shaping each other's literary imaginations.

English 3324
Section 001

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Realism in the Novel

John Samson

The course will examine the literary movement, Realism, which dominated the last half of the century and found its most significant expression in the novel. In seeking to represent American society in realistic terms, novelists tended to focus on two major issues, social class and gender roles, and our reading and discussion will center on these issues. Students will write three 5pp. interpretive papers and take a comprehensive final exam. Texts: Herman Melville, Redburn; Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Henry Adams, Democracy; William Dean Howells, A Hazard of New Fortunes; Sarah Orne Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs; and Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

English 3324
Section 002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Literature as Cultural Debate

Bryce Conrad

The nineteenth century witnessed the rapid transformation of America from an agrarian society to an urbanized and mechanized civilization. The pace of change was so fast that Henry Adams, a prominent intellectual of the day, developed the idea of the "law of acceleration" in history to explain the forces that were moving America forward with such precipitous speed. We will not simply read literature as an illustration of history, but investigate how literature both reacts to and participates in the cultural debates and historical tensions of this dynamic period. Authors to be covered include Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Thoreau, Douglass, Jacobs, Dickinson, Whitman, Crane, Chopin, Gilman, Wharton, Howells.

English 3325
Section 001,002

Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Doug Crowell

No description available.

English 3325
Section 003

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
Postmodern American Literature

Yuan Shu

This course explores how contemporary American authors have articulated their own visions and understandings of American culture and society in response to the social, political, cultural, and technological changes since the 1960s, focusing on what has been known as postmodern literature. We first read texts that engage the technological changes in American society and discuss the ways in which these authors question and negotiate this new sense of humanity manifested in our changing technological culture. We then scrutinize writings of racial minorities and women and explore the new critical vigor and sensibilities that they have brought to American literature and culture. As a gesture of conclusion, we finally investigate texts that speculate upon the possibility of a post-ethnic and post-human society in America in the new millennium.

English 3335
Section 001

Ancient and Medieval World Literature

James Whitlark

No description available.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

Utilizing the approach of Comparative Literature, this course will explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Nallund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights Movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. We will read the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Housseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. We will end the semester with the cultural collisions that produced Andre du Bus' House of Sand and Fog.

English 3351
Section 002,003

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Aaron Rudolph

This class will concentrate on contemporary poetry and writing poems to publish for a contemporary audience. Most importantly, the work produced for this class will be for a global audience and not only for individual fulfillment. There will be daily writing exercises, all which will help strengthen the student's writing skills. The class will also require reading of both traditional and contemporary poetry for each class session.

English 3351
Section 004

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Jerome Stueart

Writing Collaboratively — Life in a Small Town

Often creative writing can be a lonely profession — just you and the keyboard; often, too, students in creative writing classes are working on separate projects and rarely invest in others' writing. However, there are opportunities for collaboration in the writing world, and much benefit to be found in working together on one project. In this project, stories set in a fictitious town, students will be able to use their knowledge of small town Texas to create a believable and interesting setting for their stories.

Students will create a small Texas town from scratch, people it, give it a history, map it out. These are the only boundaries for the fiction that will come out of the class — that it must have a connection to this fictitious town created by the class, and will use references to other characters in it. These are small parameters that build writing skills.

English 3351
Section 005

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Jerome Stueart

Explorations Writers can get fooled into believing that they must only write about what they know already, instead of learning about something new, researching, or adding experiences to their lives that will fuel their fiction. The idea of “exploration” is to find something new, and writers are explorers when they dig up new information in their own lives, seek out experiences, travel through the world around them. The class will look at incorporating information outside our current experience or knowledge into fiction by charging students with bringing new information into the class, through research, personal travel, interviews, and other new experiences. We want to discover the potential for new writing material outside of our imaginations.

English 3351
Section 006,007

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

This course provides an intensive introduction to the craft of poetry and is designed for students who are passionate about exploring craft as a process. Craft provides the tools. Throughout the semester, you will become adept at reading poems closely—at reading poems as a writer. You will learn how to draft, revise, revise, and revise. The course will focus primarily on free verse poetry, although we will cover formal poetry as well, specifically the sonnet and the sestina. You will become well-versed in the following aspects of craft : the centrality of the image; poetry as music, including diction, syntax, rhyme and rhythm; the integrity of the line; point of view; the creation of authority in a poem; and that elusive magic that breathes life into the poem—voice. Process focuses on the day-to-day engagement with writing as an extension of the self; poetry as a means of exploring and expressing experience, both lived and imagined. Committing poetry to heart instills a deeper appreciation for language—rhythm, sound, the power of the spoken word.

English 3351
Section 012,016

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

William Wenthe

To take this class, you should have completed two sophomore English courses or, if English is not your major, the English requirements as specified in your major. It is not necessary to have studied poetry. It is necessary that you want to study poetry seriously: successful poetry writing means successful reading of other poets. We will do both in this course.

The classroom work will consist of intensive discussion of our own and others' poetry. As a whole, this course will require a steady commitment; for in addition to preparing for each class, you will also be writing your own poems, on your own time. The bulk of your grade will depend on how well you apply the skills learned in class to your own writing outside of class. Of course I will be available to guide you in all phases.

English 3351
Section 013

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Matthew Purdy

No description available.

English 3351
Section 015

Creative Writing
Genre: Non-fiction

Dennis Covington

No description available.

English 3360
Section 001,002

Issues in Composition

Rich Rice

No description available.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career.

English 3368
Section 001

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information
Building & Deploying Web Sites for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

Brian Still

English 3368 is a beginning web design course. To prepare students for advanced web design courses, and also for service as technical communicators (possibly designing web sites) in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), this course provides students with a well-rounded grasp of web design fundamentals, tools, and concepts. At the conclusion of the course, students will know how, working primarily with Macromedia Dreamweaver as a design platform, to assess, build, test, and deploy a web site. Students will be required to complete weekly tasks covering a range of fundamental design skills (i.e. CSS, XML/XHTML, Javascript), participate in a course Wiki, respond to readings, and design (or redesign) a web site for a client.

English 3369
Section 001

Information Design

Locke Carter

No description available.

English 3371
Section 001,002

Linguistic Science

Min-Joo Kim

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. Our primary objective is to learn the rule-governedness of human language, that is, the set of principles that underlie a linguistic system, but we will do this by focusing on English. We will first examine the main components of language – sounds, word forms, and sentence structure – and then investigate basic principles of language variation and change, language processing and acquisition. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive. This means that we will analyze what is actually spoken by people, rather than what is prescribed by language mavens. Class meetings will be organized around a lecture-discussion format but students will also be given an opportunity to present research results on a specific topic pertinent to the course towards the end of the semester.

English 3372
Section 001,002

History of the English Language

Daniel Siddiqi

This course approaches the history of the English Language from a linguistic science point of view. The course tracks the development of English from Indo-European, to German, to the Norman Invasion, to today. The focus will be bi-fold: The outer history (events in history that shaped English) and inner history (the specific changes in the language such as The Great Vowel Shift and Grimm's Law).

English 3385
Section 001

Shakespeare

Constance Kuriyama

No description available.

English 3386
Section 001

Literature and Science
Metamorphosis and Biology

Bruce Clarke

This semester we will read a number of recent narratives that walk the line between hard science fiction and hardcore fantasy. What holds them together is that, in various ways, each text imagines the transformation of the human body into other forms. While stories with metamorphic characters go back to folk tales and mythology, these stories point toward modern biology. The bodily changes they depict are “mythopoetic” responses to the biological sciences: in particular, advances in genetics, evolutionary theory, stem cells, and symbiosis. Over the semester, we will work through two excellent and accessible accounts of contemporary biology by Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan. As works of nonfiction in the genre of popular science, Microcosmos and What is Life? are rhetorically interesting in their own right, at times rising to lyrical evocations of living forms. Reading them will also allow us to respond fully to the scientific intelligence that informs the renowned speculative fictions of Ursula LeGuin and Octavia Butler, and the notorious, hilarious “biopunk” stories of Paul di Filippo.

English 3387
Section 001

Multicultural Literatures
Mexican American and Chicana/o Literature

Priscilla Ybarra

This course tours Mexican American literature and Chicana/o cultural production, and falls into three units: Early Mexican America, Emergence of Chicana/o Writing, and Contemporary Chicana/o Cultural Production. Course material draws from various genres and historical periods to sketch the rich contribution that Mexican American and Chicana/o creative voices and lived experiences lend to U.S. and global culture.

English 3387
Section 002

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
Asian American Literature

Yuan Shu

This course will investigate Asian American literature in terms of identity formation and cultural location. We will begin by examining the notion of “Asian American” politically and historically. Who are Asian Americans anyway? How have Asian American authors defined their own identities, communities, and cultural locations at different historical moments? What roles have gender, class, and sexuality played in shaping Asian American identities and communities? To fully understand the multiplicity and heterogeneity of Asian American identities, we will not only discuss texts by writers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Filipino, Vietnamese, and Iraqi descent, but will also explore texts that narrate the specific experiences that vary from the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II to the struggles of Southeast Asian refugees and immigrants in the decades since the Vietnam War.

As the term, “Asian American,” designates both the U.S.-born and the immigrant, we will also interrogate the transnational dimension of Asian American experiences. How do Asian American authors engage Asian histories and cultures in an American context? How do they understand American political and military interventions in Asia? What impact does the current process of globalization have upon Asian American identity and community formations? In considering these questions, we will develop a sense of how Asian Americans have documented their experiences and articulated their sensibilities at different historical and political junctures.

English 3388
Section 001

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Cinematic Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema.

English 3389
Section 003

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

The Short Story will provide the student with the eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context for the form. It will begin with the classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the medieval period and the Renaissance to the present day. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider selection of forms and techniques for story writing. Requirements include a creative short story written especially for this class, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and weekly quizzes on the readings.

English 3390
Section 002

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

No description available.