Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2008 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Sections 001,002

Introduction to Poetry
From Lyric to Rap and Story to Slam

Vicki Ronn

Poetry is arguably the first written art form. This course will explore the definition of poetry and its various types throughout history, both ancient and modern. Numerous authors will be covered, from Tennyson to Tupoc, and Homer to Maya Angelou. Using the elements of poetry studied, students will read various poems for interpretation, as well as summarizing and paraphrasing meaning in short essays. Since all Introduction to Literature courses are writing intensive, a longer researched paper comparing a modern poet (and his/her poetry) to one from the past will be required as well.

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

No course description.

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Staff

What is drama? What does it mean to be dramatic? What features characterize works as drama?

This course will work to answer these and other questions through the critical reading of dramatic works, spanning from the drama of ancient Greece to that of present-day America. Students will become familiar with dramatic conventions and will critically examine dramatic works both as performances and as literature. Major assignments will include two short papers, a longer analytical essay, a midterm, and a final examination.

More information available at http://www.grad.english.ttu.edu/harvey/2306.htm.

English 2307
Section H01

Introduction to Fiction - Honors

Jen Shelton

You will need to contact the Honors College to enroll in this course.

For longer than you want to know, folks considered the marriage plot to be the most appropriate storyline for girls and young women to consume; it was also the only form considered proper for women to write for many years. Within the strictures of this plot, novelists like Jane Austen found ample ground for stories that delved beyond the confines of whether (and how) the heroine could get her man (or, to be strictly accurate, be gotten by him). Other writers, though, found the marriage plot profoundly inadequate for their artistic expressions -- yet if these writers were women, they might also find that pressures to conform to this accepted plotline were overwhelming. All of this has ideological implications for the young girls who consume these texts, the men they marry, and women novelists. In this course, we'll examine romance in literature, primarily in female-authored novels, to see what permutations have been possible even in highly restrictive time-periods. We'll begin in the eighteenth century with Frances Burney's novel Evelina, we'll fill up the middle with examples of “obedient” and “resisting” marriage plot books, including novels by Austen, Bronte, Woolf, and we'll end the semester with a contemporary but satirical fairy tale. You should expect to write at least two papers, one of which will be a substantial research paper followed by a presentation to the class, to participate weekly in a web-based discussion group, to take a comprehensive final exam (covering all the course material), to participate actively in every class, and occasionally to find yourself completing assignments dictated by the needs of the particular group of individuals making up the class and therefore not included in this list. This course will be integrated with the LCG required in the First-Year Experience program of the Honors College; some work of the class will spill over to the LCG and some work of the LCG will filter into the classroom. This course is writing intensive, to prepare you for success in college.

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No course description.

English 2307
Section 032

Introduction to Fiction

Ethnic Voices & Immigration Experience

Quan Ha

This course introduces you to the study of fiction (short story, novel, and novella). We will examine prose fiction from American, British, and other national traditions. The novels that we will read focus on multicultural issues and immigration experiences. Students will be expected to complete 3 major essays, 3 tests, and reading quizzes.

English 2307
Section 024

Introduction to Fiction
Intrigue, Seduction, and Brilliant Deduction

Catherine Blackwell

"I assure you that the most winning woman I ever knew was hanged for poisoning three little children for their insurance-money, and the most repellent man of my acquaintance is a philanthropist who has spent nearly a quarter of a million upon the London poor." As Holmes suggests to Watson in The Sign of the Four, evil may lurk behind a veil of goodness. But where does good end and evil begin? Are these concepts divided by a true boundary or an imaginary one? What separates reality from illusion?

This course invites students to explore these questions through mystery fiction of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Short selections may include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Sue Grafton, and Sara Paretsky. Longer readings will include Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of the Four, and M.E. Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their class participation and attendance, informal reading responses, short essays, and a final project or examination.

English 2308
Multiple sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

Non-fiction surrounds us: it's e-mail; it's prose in newspapers and magazines. But some of it is amenable to both literary and rhetorical analyses and offers readers the blend of imagination and intellect that other literary forms do. Students will be expected to complete two close reading papers, a short autobiographical essay, an annotated bibliography, final project, and the final exam. Unexcused absences over three will result in a 5 % grade reduction for each additional absence. This policy begins on the first day of classes for those who are registered as of that date.

English 2311
Multiple sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple sections

Introduction to Creative Writing

Staff

No course description.

English 2388
Multiple sections

Introduction to Film Studies

Staff

No course description.

English 2391
Section 001

Introduction to Critical Writing
Faust: Variations on a Theme

Karen Keck

Through the exploration of texts centered on the story of Dr. Johann Faust or a similar figure, students will look at different genres to learn how to construct close readings with appropriate literary terminology.

English 2391
Section 002

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

This course will introduce students to the forms and practices of critical writing for courses in English literature. Students taking the course will be expected to have basic knowledge of college-level writing already, including how to make clear, concise written arguments with locatable thesis statements, supporting evidence, and conclusions. The course will develop these basic skills for use in English literature courses by training students to close-read literary texts; to locate both primary and secondary sources; paraphrase and quote those sources while using them as evidence to prove an argument; properly and responsibly cite sources. Students will regularly exchange work and provide each other with comments, suggestions, and feedback. In addition students will be introduced to basic scholarly and theoretical approaches to literary texts, and how to recognize those approaches.