Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2008 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Sections 001,002

Old and Middle English Literature
Old English: Monsters, Vikings, Miracles

Brian McFadden

This course will examine Old English literature (c. 730-1066) in the context of the major events of the period, the Viking invasions and the Benedictine reforms, which began to establish the idea of England as a nation and to define it as a “self” against foreign “others.” Genres will be Anglo-Saxon history (Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); saints' lives (Ælfric's Lives of Saints, the Life of St. Margaret) homilies and sermons (Ælfric, Wulfstan); allegory (Panther, Phoenix, Whale); riddles; heroic poetry (Beowulf, Judith, The Battle of Maldon, Dream of the Rood); elegies (The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Husband's Message, The Wife's Lament, Wulf and Eadwacer); and monster texts (The Letter of Alexander to Aristotle; Wonders of the East). We will also examine several Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts (Hali Meiðhad, Lanval, the Bayeux Tapestry, and some romances) to examine how the genres changed in England after the Norman Conquest. Requirements: participation; two midterm exams; final exam; 8-10 page research essay.This course, when taken in conjunction with Dr. Couch's 3302 class that focuses on Middle English, will give students a well-rounded view of medieval English literature.

English 3305
Sections 001,002

British Renaissance Literature

Lara Crowley

No description available.

English 3307
Sections 001,002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature

Marta Kvande

No description available.

English 3309
Sections 001,002

Modern and Contemporary British Literature

William Wenthe

No description available.

English 3324
Sections 001,002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey of the Novel

John Samson

The course will be a survey of the novel from 1838 to 1899, and we will read and discuss the major authors and their most representative works from this period. Students will write three short (4 pp.) interpretive papers, take daily responses or quizzes, and write a comprehensive final exam. Texts: Edgar Allan Poe, Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Herman Melville, Moby-Dick; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; William Dean Howells, A Hazard of New Fortunes; Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

English 3325
Sections 001,002

Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Bryce Conrad

No description available.

English 3336
Sections 001

Early Modern World Literature

Ann Hawkins

Literary works always exist in context. When Lord Byron titled his epic poem Don Juan, he knew that even though his hero's name is pronounced Joo-uhn, not Hwan, his readers would read his text as a response to the old Spanish tradition. In fact, he expected it, and at every turn he toyed with the expectations his readers gained from their own reading the Spanish hero. In this way the Spanish text becomes an intertext for Byron's, and we call this relationship between works intertextuality.

In particular we'll take two approaches:

1. We'll consider the ways that authors consciously evoke other authors and other periods in their works—as in the example with Byron above.

2. We'll think about the way that particular ideas transform and reform from one period to another. For example we'll consider the development of the argument for women's education, reading Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz's 1691 Response to Sor Filotea; Mary Astell's 1694 Serious Proposal to the Ladies; Anna Letitia Barbauld's 1795 “The Rights of Woman,” her poetic response to Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Elizabeth Cady Stanton's 1848 Declaration of Rights and Sentiments; and John Stuart Mill's 1869 essay On the Subjugation of Women. Or for a different example we'll look at Cervantes's problem with pirated and unauthorized versions of Don Quixote, then we'll look at other writers who complained about the nature of authorship and the fickle (or perhaps unstable) public markets for books.

We'll also think about the challenges of reading texts in a language not their original. In fact, for a short paper, students will choose a text then examine a section of it in multiple translations, writing on the benefits and limitations of reading one translation over the others, and examining how reviewers have talked about the quality of the translations when compared, not to each other, but to the original.

English 3337
Sections 001,002

Modern and Contemporary World Literature

Kanika Batra

No description available.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature

Ann Ransdell

This course will use the comparative literature approach to explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Naslund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. The Vietnam war will be seen from the perspective of Bao Ninh's Sorrow of War, and the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Housseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. Requirements include weekly quizzes on the readings, a midterm, a final, an oral presentation, and a paper contrasting a character in the fiction/film version of one of these works. The attendance policy allows no absences beyond one without documentation through some kind of dated bill or paper. This policy begins upon the student's registration in the class.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Staff

No description available. Please contact teacher

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Rich Rice

No description available.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher.

English 3366
Multiple Sections

Style in Technical Writing

Staff

In Style in Technical Communication, we will examine what constitutes a style, and identify characteristics of the most frequently used styles in technical and professional communication. We will study discourse communities, how they determine which styles are appropriate for which contexts, and how we as authors can determine the appropriateness of a certain style for a situation. Finally, we will learn how to create these styles in our own writing. This is the tentative assignment list. It will not be final until one week before the semester begins.

English 3367
Sections 001

Usability Testing

Brian Still

Developing and implementing rigorous and valid laboratory tests to find out how people use products, and how those products can be improved to be more usable, is not only important, but also professionally rewarding. User Experience Engineering, as well as User Experience Design, consistently boasts job openings. Microsoft, for one, employs hundreds of user experience professionals.

It isn't necessary that you come from any particular background, but experience is important. But how can you get the experience and training necessary when you're new to the field? Take English 3367, Usability Testing this upcoming fall semester (T-Th, 9:30 to 10:50). You will get hands-on experience developing and implementing usability testing of real users using real products in a state-of-the-art facility, the TTU Usability Research Lab.

Group work (you pick your groups) is required because lab development and implementation requires teamwork to be successful, but there will also be built into the course assessment individual work, such as a site visit. Students in the past that have taken the course have come from different backgrounds; in fact, in a graduate version of the course just last semester we had students from technical communication, business, industrial engineering, and psychology.

Even if you're not interested in working as a user experience professional, 3367 is a great elective for a number of different majors, even those interested in a career in law, for example, because it trains you to understand people and how they use all of the products in their everyday personal and work lives. You also get practical experience with technology and communicating to clients about test results.

English 3371
Multiple Sections

Linguistic Science

Staff

This course will provide an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. Our primary objective is to learn what language is and how language systems work. We will first examine the main components of language – sounds, word forms, and sentence structure – and we will then investigate principles of language variation and language change. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive, and our primary focus will be on the English language. Class meetings will be organized around a lecture-discussion format.

English 3372
Section 001

History of the English Language

Brian McFadden

This course will examine the development of the English language from its origins in Anglo-Saxon England through changes in the later medieval and Early Modern periods to the attempts to codify the language in the eighteenth century and the development of modern language study in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine both the internal history (the linguistic changes that occur within the language over time) and the external history (the effects of social and political events on the language) of English in order to answer such questions as: Why do English words often resemble words from other languages? Why are there so many “irregular” verbs in English? Why don't we spell words as they sound? Why don't we split infinitives or put a preposition at the end of a sentence when other Germanic languages do? We will also examine contemporary issues in English to see how the language has implications for our political and social lives. We will also learn to use online tools such as the Oxford English Dictionary and the Dictionary of Old English Corpus to assist in linguistic and literary research. Texts include Millward, A Biography of the English Language; Ayers, English Words from Latin and Greek Elements; and several E-Reserve readings.

English 3373
Section 002

Modern English Syntax

Min-Joo Kim

This course provides an overview of the structure and usage of Modern American English. The material covered in the course is relevant to teachers at the public school level, and to those requiring a basic knowledge of the form and function of Modern American English. Topics to be covered will include: basic word structure, classification of words into what is traditionally known as "parts of speech", description and analysis of sentence patterns in English, prescriptive versus descriptive approaches to English grammar, particularly in the context of appropriate usage (e.g., written vs. spoken language), stylistic, and dialectal variation in syntax, and grammaticalization, a process in which a lexical items looses its original meaning to serve the needs of grammar (e.g., pronouns, modal auxiliary verbs, complementizers).

English 3387
Section 002

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3388
Sections 001,002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Cinematic Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema. Sports to be examined include baseball, basketball, boxing, football, golf, surfing, and fishing.

English 3390
Section 001

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

This course introduces students to a variety of texts from the region currently referred to as the American Southwest. We will explore several distinctive subcultures of the United States through traditional and contemporary Native American poetry, early Anglo adventure writing, postmodern Chicano fiction, and classic Southwestern nature writing. What common threads run through these works? Where do the visions and voices of authors collide or overlap? How is the sense of this region imagined across cultures, histories, and into a globalized future? We will attempt to answer these questions and assess student learning outcomes through close readings, class discussions, précis, two research essays, a mid-term and final, as well as in-class presentations of selected programs from the radio documentary series “Writing the Southwest,” featuring interviews with some of this semester's authors.

English 3391
Section 001

Literature and War
The American War in Vietnam Literature

Yuan Shu

In American popular culture Vietnam has usually been represented as a war rather than a country of history and culture. Now thirty-three years after the fall of Saigon in April 30, 1975, how should we move beyond the Hollywood representation of the war and cultivate new understandings of the country and the people? This course aims to offer a balanced view of the war from the diverse perspectives of Americans, Vietnamese, as well as Americans of Vietnamese descent, taking into consideration the history, people, and culture of Vietnam. We will explore different genres that include prose fiction, drama, poetry, film, song lyric, as well as oral history, and discuss authors with diverse racial, gender, class, and cultural backgrounds.