Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2008 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section
002

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Magic and Miracle, Heroes and Saints

Brian McFadden

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the overlap between the genres of romance and saint's life. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing. No description available.

English 3302
001

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Magic and Miracle, Heroes and Saints

Julie Couch

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the overlap between the genres of romance and saint's life. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing.

English 3304
Section 001

Medieval and Renaissance Drama

Marliss Desens

No description available.

English 3308
Section H01

Nineteenth Century British Literature

Marjean Purinton

The British Romantic period (1780-1830) generated much social upheaval, political change, religious uncertainty, familial disruptions, and identity confusion. It was a revolutionary time when literature challenged and championed the prevailing attitudes and customs. One of the many revolutionary dimensions of British Romantic culture was that of science, medicine, and psychology—discourses and practices that attempted to explain the mind and body. We see Romantic preoccupations with the mind and body in the period's literature with haunting frequency.

The Romantic period revolution in science produced multiple forms for mediating post-Enlightenment dualisms, such as biochemistry, and magic, romance and Gothic, medicine and quackery, bodies and spirits. Discursively constructed monsters or aberrations were embodied as grotesques, their corporeal representations connected to the body, its anatomy, its physiology, it potential for disease and deformity, its propensity for physical disabilities and socio-sexual transgressions. Creatively constructed ghosts represented scientific scrutiny and speculation about mental disorders—hallucinations, hysteria, deliria, madness, mania, nervous disorders—all charged with new medical significations. In this seminar, we will explore literary representations of Romantic ghosts and grotesques that sought to explain, expose, and contain the mysteries of the mind and body addressed by the period's discourses of science, medicine, and psychology.

Our learning environment will be interactive, reading and writing intensive, but fun. Activities will include short response papers, group work, discovery activities, and ample class discussion. Your final project will be an analytical and documented essay that could well serve you as a writing sample for your dossier.

Because my scholarship and pedagogy are informed by feminism, you will encounter instruction facilitated by de-centered authority. You are invited to participate in your own learning/discovery process. Be prepared to be challenged as a critical reader and analytical writer. Be willing to consider new ideas and perspectives. Be prepared to have fun and to learn something about yourself and the human condition. This course is particularly useful to students planning to go to graduate school, law school, or medical school.

English 3324
Section 001

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey of Poetry and Prose

John Samson

The course will cover a range of American poetry and prose from 1820 to 1899. We will examine how American authors broke away from the European tradition to form the American Renaissance, how they responded to slavery and the Civil War, and how they portrayed the diverse cultural forces of the last third of the century. Students will write two (4 pp.) interpretive essays and take a midterm and a final exam. Texts: John Hollander, ed., American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century; Nathaniel Hawthorne, Young Goodman Brown and Other, Short Stories; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of Frederick Douglass; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner; Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; and Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class.

English 3336
Section 001

Early Modern World Literature
Works that Changed Man's Thoughts, the Long and the Short of It

Wendell Aycock

This semester, English 3336 will focus on some longer works that have been classics for centuries and that have helped initiate some new approaches to literature. Don Quixote has often been called the first modern novel, Madame Bovary introduced poetic devices into the narrative genre, and Crime and Punishment introduced psychology into the novel. In addition to these longer works, we will look at Lazarillo de Tormes (anonymous), Voltaire's Candide, Lope de Vega's The Playboy of Seville, and a few other shorter works. Students will benefit from this course because they will have the opportunity to read works that rarely appear in English Department offerings and works that are not only world classics, but are also interesting and fun. Requirements will be two short essays (three to five pages), a mid-term examination, a term paper (ten to fifteen pages), and a final examination.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

Utilizing the approach of Comparative Literature, this course will explore the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment, as well as the antidotes to those terrors in art, healing, courage and relationships. We will focus on fiction, with some presentations in drama. We will learn about historical events that produced powerful literature of political conflict. We will read Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front on World War I, and Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago on the Russian Revolution. We will discuss the aftermath of racism in both Naslund's Four Spirits, concerning the Civil Rights Movement, and in the apartheid connected with Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. We will read the depiction of Chile's Pinochet Terror in Allende's House of the Spirits. Hosseini's portrait of the Russian and Taliban invasions of Afghanistan in The Kite Runner will be followed by Scott Simon's rendition of the Bosnian-Serbian clash in Pretty Birds. We will also read the fictional account of a true story by Lorraine Adams, Harbor, about the immigrant experience of an Algerian stowaway into contemporary America.

English 3351
Section TBA

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction or Nonfiction

Dennis Covington

This 3351 taken at Junction may be taken either as fiction or nonfiction. Classes will meet in a workshop format for three hours every morning. Students will be expected to write for three hours every afternoon or evening and to turn in at least 30 pages of prose by the end of the two-week session. The emphasis will be on creating (in short stories, novel chapters, or essays) what Henry James calls “a direct impression of life.”

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Staff

No description available.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Staff

This course aims to help you expand your knowledge of fiction, so that, by the course's end, you will be able to understand the elements of fiction and to write stories using these elements. Too, we will discuss the forms and genres of short fiction, and you will practice these forms and genres in your writing. This course will help strengthen critical thinking and evaluation skills, and by the end of the course, students should be able to critique others' writing, to use or apply criticism to both published works and others students' works. In this course, we will be exploring how to write fiction, and we also will focus on the craft of writing short fiction, on trying new forms and/or genres, and on studying literary terminology and genres, so that we all have the same vocabulary as we proceed into workshop. Students will write four stories, workshopping three of them. Students may miss five classes. After that your grade will be penalized.

English 3351
Multiple Sections

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Staff

No description available.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Kevin Garrison

No description available.

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Multiple Sections

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career. For further information please contact the teacher..

English 3368
Section 002

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Laura Palmer

No description available.

English 3370
Section 001

Information Design

Sean Zdenek

No description available.

English 3371
Section 001, 002

Linguistic Science

Jay Williams

Introduction to Linguistics. Investigates modern theory and practice in the description and analysis of natural languages. Analyzes the mechanics of sounds, words, and sentences and usage. Investigates pidgins, creoles, dialects, neural/psychological descriptions, historical development, Native American languages, and ASL.

English 3373
Section 001, 002

Modern English Syntax

Jay Williams

Introduction to basic concepts of grammar. Analyzes how words are built and their resulting structure and distribution within a hierarchical framework.

English 3385
Section 001

Shakespeare

Constance Kuriyama

No description available.

English 3387
Section 001, 002

Multicultural Literatures
Chicana/o Cultural Production

Priscilla Ybarra

This course tours Mexican American literature and Chicana and Chicano cultural production, and falls into three units: Early Mexican American, Emergence of Chicana/o Writing, and Contemporary Chicana/o Cultural Production. Course material draws from various genres and historical periods to sketch the rich contribution that Mexican American and Chicana/o creative voices and lived experiences lend to U.S. and global culture. Students will write two research papers, lead a class discussion, complete regularly-scheduled reading quizzes, and participate in regular classroom discussion.

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
South Asian Multiculturalisms: Cultures, Conflicts, and Diasporas

Kanika Batra

The term ‘South Asian' indicates a diversity of nationalities, languages, ethnicities, and religions from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. People from these nations have contributed variously to the multicultural societies they have chosen as their home away from home. South Asian writers have represented the cultural conflicts and accommodations required in the lands of their origin as well as the places of their migration.

To take one example, since the 1980s, Sri Lanka, a tiny island nation in South Asia, has witnessed conflict between the two main ethnic groups: indigenous Sinhalas (the word literally means “people of the lion”) comprising the majority and Tamil migrants from India who are in a numerical minority. While the origins of the conflict can be traced to religious and linguistic differences exacerbated by British colonial rule over Sri Lanka, its perpetuation is the result of divisive political policies in the decades following Sri Lanka's independence in 1948. The result is unabated violence between the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) demanding a separate homeland in the northern part of the nation and the Sri Lankan government's refusal to concede this demand. Though this violent chapter in Sri Lankan history is nowhere near the end, a growing awareness of the complicated nature of the conflict including a combination of ethnic, religious and linguistic factors and its political, social, cultural and human cost is being articulated in recent Sri Lankan writing. One of the social effects of this conflict is large scale migration of Sri Lankans to the West, primarily Australia, England, Canada, and the US, holding out the promise of a peaceful multicultural existence.

What are the primary causes of the South Asian diasporas to the West? What literary strategies and genres do writers use to reflect and transmute the South Asian experience into aesthetics? When these experiences carry memories of violence, such as that of the long drawn out struggle in Sri Lanka, does this aestheticization diminish the horror and devastation of violence? Do authors have an ethical responsibility towards the society from which they draw their inspiration? This course attempts to answer some of these questions through a selection of South Asian writing, with a special emphasis on Sri Lankan literature. The history, fiction, poetry and drama we will be reading thus encourages a sustained analysis of the connections between politics, violence, experience, memory, migration, literary form, and readership.

English 3387
Section 006

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3388
Section 002, 003

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Narrative Closures

Scott Baugh

No description available.

English 3388
Section 004

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Cinematic Sports Narratives

Mike Schoenecke

Not only is sport important and beautiful, it says a lot about who we are and who we aspire to be. Sports films capture clear, clean moments of human aspiration and success/defeat. Film seems attracted to the athletic contest, whether it be by individuals against the limitations of time and space or the efforts of teams working toward a common goal. Race, gender, nationalism, and class are major components of sport and its reflection through cinema. Sports to be examined include baseball, basketball, boxing, football, golf, surfing, and fishing. Students will be expected to complete short papers and a final examination. Attendance policy begins the second week of classes.

English 3390
Section 001, 002

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

This course introduces students to a variety of texts from the region currently referred to as the American Southwest. We will explore traditional and contemporary Native American poetry, early Anglo adventure writing, postmodern Chicano fiction, and classic Southwestern nature writing. What common threads run through these works? Where do the visions and voices of authors collide or overlap? How is the sense of this region imagined across cultures, histories, and into a globalized future? We will attempt to answer these questions through close readings, class discussions, précis, two research essays, a mid-term and final, as well as in-class presentations of selected programs from the radio documentary series “Writing the Southwest,” featuring interviews with some of this semester's authors. For more information, please check my webpage at http://www.faculty.english.ttu.edu/spurgeon.