Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2008 | 4000 Level

English 4300
Section 001

Individual Studies in English

Course number normally used for individual/independent studies arranged between an English professor and a student. Students must have already completed a course with the instructor. The instructor is not obligated to agree to supervise the independent study. The student will normally have a topic in mind and will approach the instructor for feasibility. A form, which may be picked up in EN 211C, must be filled out and approved by the Chair of the English Department. The form is then delivered to 211C and the advisor enrolls the student. The teacher submits the grade to the Chair for posting.

English 4301
Section 001

Studies in Selected Authors
Virginia Wolfe

Jen Shelton

No description available. 

English 4301
Section 002

Studies in Selected Authors
Alexander Pope

Jennifer Snead

This course examines the writings, career, and reception of one of the eighteenth century's most notorious (and most influential) literary celebrities: Alexander Pope. We'll read most of Pope's major works and many of his minor ones; we'll read the works of some of his contemporary friends and enemies; we'll read Pope criticism from Samuel Johnson to Laura Brown. Prosody, poetics, and eighteenth-century publication practices will be a recurrent theme of the course as well. Our readings, writings, and discussions will center on how Pope's writing, career, and reception informed and were informed by the society, aesthetic values, and print culture of his day, and continue to be shaped by the literary-critical interests and obsessions of ours.

English 4301
Section 003

Studies in Selected Authors
Octavia E. Butler's Literary Accomplishment

Bruce Clarke

Octavia Butler (1947-2006) was the foremost African-American feminist author of science fiction of her time. Spanning four decades and fifteen volumes, Butler's fictions reside just to one side or over the horizon of the historical world, approaching a range of social issues painful to probe in their stark historical or personal reality. The worlds she invented are populated by individuals and groups placed under evolutionary pressures. Some are human, some mutant, some extraterrestrial. Still others are the children of unions between humans and mutants, or humans and extraterrestrials. Sometimes alone but typically in small groups, families or packs, her characters confront specters of deliberate or inadvertent extinction, the divergence of natural or constructed variations, the selection of hybrids or of the bearers of mutations. Their futures can be purchased only at the price of irrecoverable loss and irrevocable change.

Her acclaimed novel Kindred mysteriously transfers Dana, a post-civil-rights-movement African-American woman in an interracial marriage, back and forth from horrific adventures in antebellum Maryland. This one mainstream book with a time-travel twist from her earlier career indicates the default decoding of all the others—slavery, racial conflict, cultural domination and social oppression, and class and gender inequity, as these have plagued Western civilization in general and American society in particular. Foreclosing easy ways out of confronting the dilemmas of survival and coexistence, probing the fissures of society, race, and species, Butler's fictions locate rare moments of improbable accord. In response to the metamorphoses of bodies and environments, her theme is the interpenetration of individual, social, and planetary changes.

English 4311
Section 003

Studies in Poetry
20 & 21st Century American Women Poets & Myth

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

The course will be an intensive investigation of the ways in which (mostly) contemporary American women poets integrate myth into their work—and their motivations for doing so. Myth includes archetypal figures from religion, literature (including folklore), and popular culture. Rewriting or reinterpreting myth also involves the woman poet's revision of tradition, history, and various forms of collective memory. The poets we will study include Elizabeth Bishop, Marianne Moore, Eavan Boland, Renata Wood, Joy Harjo, Sandra Cisneros, Rita Dove, Anne Carson, Mary Szybist, and Henrietta Goodman. The course will be discussion-centered and reading as well as writing intensive.

English 4311
Section 003

Studies in Poetry
20 & 21st Century American Women Poets & Myth

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

The course will be an intensive investigation of the ways in which (mostly) contemporary American women poets integrate myth into their work—and their motivations for doing so. Myth includes archetypal figures from religion, literature (including folklore), and popular culture. Rewriting or reinterpreting myth also involves the woman poet's revision of tradition, history, and various forms of collective memory. The poets we will study include Elizabeth Bishop, Marianne Moore, Eavan Boland, Renata Wood, Joy Harjo, Sandra Cisneros, Rita Dove, Anne Carson, Mary Szybist, and Henrietta Goodman. The course will be discussion-centered and reading as well as writing intensive.

English 4314
Section 001

Studies in Nonfiction
Maxine Hong Kingston: Identity, Ethnicity, and the Ethics of Life Writing

Yuan Shu

In the canon of Asian American literature or multicultural literatures of the United States, Maxine Hong Kingston has occupied a unique place in raising the awareness of Asian American gender issues and the transnational dimension of Asian American literature. This course focuses on the three non-fictional works of Maxine Hong Kingston, examining critical issues in life writing that vary from identity formation to ethics of life writing. We begin by reading Kingston's memoir, The Woman Warrior, and familiarizing ourselves with recent scholarship on race, gender, and autobiography. We explore the controversies and problems that Kingston's work has provoked in Asian American communities and discuss the critical exchanges between Asian American cultural nationalists and feminists on the issue of authenticity and ethnicity. Then we scrutinize Kingston's China Men and reconsider the relationship between autobiography and ethnography. Finally, we concentrate on Kingston's recent work, Fifth Book of Peace, and investigate the question of ethics in life writing.

English 4315
Section 001

Studies in Film

Scott Baugh

No description available. 

English 4351
Section 003

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Stephen Jones

Students will be submitting for workshop between four and six stories, of varying genre and reading the new Best American Short Stories very closely.

What students can do to get in: send me one page of fiction which, y'know, puts them in the best light, characterizes their writing abilities, all that. Doesn't need to be a complete story, though it can be. Basically, what I'm looking for is that, in 4351, we'll be able to talk story elements, not get bogged down with mechanical concerns (punctuation, sentence rhythm, etc).

When to request permission: students can e-mail their submission to me whenever, though I likely won't be making decisions until, at the earliest, the week of Nov 19th.

English 4351
Section 004

Advanced Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

The course will be a reading and writing intensive poetry workshop. Participants will continue to develop their individual styles by building on their strengths as poets. In addition, everyone will be expected to take risks in terms of subject matter and form.

English 4366
Section 001

Technical and Professional Editing

Kirk St Amant

No description available. 

English 4371
Section 001

Language and Community

Staff

This course meets twice weekly, and it requires all students to contribute to our Lubbock community in the form of tutoring adults in English as a second language. We will explore how to teach, how language reveals ideologies on race, and how language can be a vehicle for empowerment in society. This course combines practice with theory, and you will develop practical and marketable skills in diversity, team-building, communication and teaching. This course has a service-learning component, meaning students will apply what they learn in the trenches, working on a community-based project to provide classes in English as a Second Language. Students will form teams of tutors to teach these classes, which will serve diverse students, many of whom are from an international background. They will also meet once weekly with the professor for discussion, debriefing, and debate over theory versus practice, as well as keep weekly journals/blogs of reflection, planning, critique, and evaluation of the tutoring sessions. Tech students will turn in a final research, reflective, and/or creative project, and at the end of the semester, teammates and ESL students will evaluate tutor performance. This course offers a great way to contribute to our community, to experience diversity in Lubbock, to work on communication skills, and to work for a more just and equitable society.

English 4373
Section 001

Studies in Linguistics
World's Languages

Min-Joo Kim

This course is concerned with language variation, that is, languages of the world are different from each other. But, along the way, we will also learn about how certain core linguistic properties hold of them regardless of their genetic or geographical relationship. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to have basic knowledge of worlds' languages and how they are classified, to conduct a preliminary fieldwork in linguistic documentation, and to read and understand data from various languages.

English 4374
Multiple Sections

Senior Seminar

Staff

Please contact English undergraduate advisor (suzi.duffy@ttu.edu, 742-2500 ext 254, EN 211C) for permission to enroll in the course.

English 4378
Section 001

Internship in Technical Communication

Staff

Course number used for internships in technical writing. Internship proposals may be submitted to the director of the Technical Communication program, Dr. Thomas Barker (thomas.barker@ttu.edu, 742-2500 ext 237, EN 211A) on a form that may be obtained from him.

English 4380
Section 001

Professional Issues in Technical Communication

Locke Carter

Please contact Director of Technical Communication (thomas.barker@ttu.edu, 742-2500 ext 237, EN 211A) for permission to enroll in the course.