Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2009 | 2000 Level

English 2305
Section 001,002

Introduction to Poetry
Reading and Responding to Contemporary Voices of Women

Jessicca Vidrine

This introductory course on poetry will focus on contemporary female poets. We will study various forms of poetry written by women in recent decades, focusing on the themes of the body, motherhood, relationships, love, spirituality, and the female archetype.

English 2305
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Poetry

Staff

No description available. 

English 2306
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Drama

Staff

No description available. 

English 2306
Section 006

Introduction to Drama

Constance Kuriyama

While most introduction to drama courses emphasize tragedy and straight drama, this course will emphasize comedy, which is arguably the subtlest and most flexible of dramatic modes. However, readings will include several classic tragedies. The works we study will range from ancient Greek plays to twentieth-century silent film comedy, from highly verbal to almost purely visual forms. Some questions that we will consider during the semester are: What do we laugh at, and why? Does our sense of humor vary with time, place, and circumstance? How does comic pleasure differ from tragic pleasure? Or does it?

English 2306
Section H01

Introduction to Drama
Tragically Monstrous

Marjean Purinton

You will need to contact the Honors College to enroll in this course.

If “all the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players,” then we can learn much about the world by looking at its drama. In this interactive FYE course, we will explore tragedies that expose and examine the monstrosities of the human experience – actual monsters and monstrous behaviors. We will pursue such questions as: Why do these manifestations of the monstrous appear in our classic tragedies? What is tragic about the monstrous? What constitutes the tragically monstrous? What satisfaction do we derive by seeing the monstrous staged in tragedies? We will read several tragedies from Greek theatre to the contemporary stage that feature the monstrous in one form or another: Medea by Euripides, Othello by William Shakespeare, De Montfort by Joanna Baillie, A Doll;s House by Henrik Ibsen, The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, Trifles by Susan Glaspell, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, The Elephant Man by Bernard Pomerance, and Proof by David Auburn. Some of these dramas may be new to you, and some may offer you renewed readings and reflection. We will view cinematic versions of several tragedies. We will also attend a play staged at one of the Texas Tech University theatres this fall.

Our activities will include informal response papers, a review of a staged performance, a creative discovery activity, plus ample discussion and dramatics. We will have fun in our discoveries about the human condition, the monstrous, and tragic drama. Come prepared to participate in your own learning experience.

English 2307
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Fiction

Staff

No description available. 

English 2307
Section 007,010

Introduction to Fiction
Adventure, Treasure, & Murder: The Sensational 19th Century

Catherine Blackwell

This course will introduce students to fictional conventions by exploring mystery, sensation, and adventure novels written during or about the 19th century.

English 2307
Section 014,016

Introduction to Fiction
Speculative Fiction

Rebecca Surovik

Speculative fiction (science fiction and fantasy) examines the world we live in through the creation of other worlds or alternative realities. This course will engage in critical thinking and writing about literature through reading and analyzing short stories and novels of speculative fiction. More information will be forthcoming at http://www.grad.english.ttu.edu/surovik/2307/2307.html.

English 2307
Section 025,027

Introduction to Fiction
International Short Stories & Asian American Novels

Quan Ha

This course introduces you to the study of fiction (short story, novel, and novella). We will examine prose fiction (mainly short stories) from American, British, and other national traditions. We will also read four contemporary Asian American novels to explore current issues in ethnic/racial studies.

English 2307
Section H01

Introduction to Fiction
The Marriage Plot

Jen Shelton

You will need to contact the Honors College to enroll in this course.

For longer than you want to know, folks considered the marriage plot to be the most appropriate storyline for girls and young women to consume; it was also the only form considered proper for women to write for many years. Within the strictures of this plot, novelists like Jan Austen found ample ground for stories that delved beyond the confines of whether (and how) the heroine could get her man (or, to be strictly accurate, be gotten by him). Other writers, though, found the marriage plot profoundly inadequate for their artistic expressions – yet if these writers were women, they might also find that pressures to conform to this accepted plotline were overwhelming. All of this has ideological implications for the young girls who consumed these texts, the men they marry, and women novelists. In this course, we'll examine romance in literature, primarily in female-authored novels, to see what permutations have been possible even in highly restrictive time-periods. We'll begin in the eighteenth century with Frances Burney's novel Evelina, we'll fill up the middle with examples of “obedient” and “resisting” marriage plot books, including novels by Austen, Bronte, Woolf, and we'll end the semester with a contemporary but satirical fairy tale.

English 2308
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Nonfiction

Staff

No description available. 

English 2308
Section 005,006

Introduction to Nonfiction
Things You Wouldn't Discuss at the Kitchen Table

Ruben Quesada

This class will be a critical study of and writing about the sociological impact of contemporary nonfiction. Students will read texts focused on race, class, gender, and religion in contemporary nonfiction.

English 2311
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Technical Writing

Staff

English 2311 assists students in developing the writing ability required by their future professions. Six to nine writing assignments are required. Students in this class will analyze the communication situation fully and accurately (needs, audiences, uses, and constraints); gather, interpret, and document information logically, efficiently, and ethically; develop professional work and teamwork habits; and design usable, clear, persuasive, accessible workplace documents.

English 2351
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Creative Writing

Aaron Alford

No description available. 

English 2351
Section H01

Introduction to Creative Writing
Writing in the Outdoors

Kurt Caswell

If you love to write and be outdoors, this class is for you. Our primary task is to workshop your creative nonfiction essays, but you'll also write regularly in a field journal as a springboard for ideas, subjects, and inspiration. [Some poetry will be covered as well.] You will study major American writers in the naturalist tradition such as John Muir, Willam Stafford, Terry Tempest Williams, Wendell Berry, Annie Dillard, and Barry Lopez (who is a distinguished visiting scholar here at Tech).

English 2388
Section 160

Introduction to Film Studies

Scott Baugh

This course introduces students to the history, aesthetics, and criticism of film. More specifically, the course will survey landmark moments in the evolution in cinema and will cover foundational film concepts and reading strategies in the three major genres of avant-garde, documentary, and fictive-narrative.

English 2391
Multiple Sections

Introduction to Critical Writing

Staff

No description available.