Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Fall 2009 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 001,003

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Magic and Miracle, Heroes and Saints

Julie Nelson Couch

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the overlap between the genres of romance and saint's life. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing.

English 3304
Section 001

Medieval and Renaissance Drama

Marliss Desens

No description available. 

English 3307
Section 002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature

Jennifer Snead

No description available. 

English 3309
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary British Literature
Science in Modern Society

Bruce Clarke

This course will look at the way literary narratives in 20th century Britain have portrayed the interplay between science and society. In this period, the sciences of evolution, energy, entropy, and chaos theory accompany a host of social schemes and concerns, powerfully refracted in the storyworlds under narration: eugenics, degeneration, political order vs. cultural chaos, the possibility of not of individual and social renovation, of global utopia or planetary catastrophe. In the process, we will think about observation as an activity that connects the scientific study of nature and the literary study of narratives.

English 3323
Section 001

Early American Literature

Michelle Currie

No description available. 

English 3324
Section 001,002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Survey of Poetry

John Samson

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the major authors and themes in 19th-century American poetry. The course will also help students develop their skills in literary interpretation and analysis of poetry, its variations, conventions and structures: to determine what details in a text are significant, to find and develop topics from the text, and to write analytical essays.

English 3325
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Bryce Conrad

No description available. 

English 3325
Section 002

Modern and Contemporary American Literature
Postmodern American Literature

Yuan Shu

This course explores how contemporary American authors have articulated their own visions and understandings of American culture and society in response to the social, political, cultural, and technological changes since the 1960s, focusing on what has been known as postmodern literature. We first read texts that engage the technological changes in American society and discuss the ways in which these authors question and negotiate this new sense of humanity manifested in our changing technological culture. We then scrutinize writings of racial minorities and women and explore the new critical vigor and sensibilities that they have brought to American literature and culture. As a gesture of conclusion, we finally investigate texts that speculate upon the possibility of a post-ethnic and post-human society in America in the new millennium.

English 3351
Section 001

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 003

Creative Writing

Doug Crowell

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 004

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 005

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Doug Crowell

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 007

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Dennis Covington

This is a fiction-writing workshop. Students will be expected to complete three original short stories varying in length from 1500 to 3000 words minimum.

English 3351
Section 009

Creative Writing
Genre: Non-Fiction

Dennis Covington

This class will be a writing workshop in the genre called creative nonfiction. Students will be expected to complete three original pieces of creative non-fiction.

English 3351
Section 013

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Jill Patterson

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 014

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Diane Warner

No description available. 

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Rich Rice

No description available. 

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career.

English 3366
Section 002

Style in Technical Writing

Angela Eaton

In Style in Technical Communication, we will examine what constitutes a style, and identify characteristics of the most frequently used styles in technical and professional communication. We will study discourse communities, how they determine which styles are appropriate for which contexts, and how we as authors can determine the appropriateness of a certain style for a situation. Finally, we will learn how to create these styles in our own writing.

English 3368
Section 001

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Craig Baehr

No description available. 

English 3371
Section 003,004

Linguistic Science

Min-Joo Kim

This course provides an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. We will learn about the set of underlying principles of human language by analyzing the English language in detail and also looking at data drawn from other languages. The course will be organized around subareas of linguistics, which concern word forms, sound patterns, sentence structure, and meaning. Time permitting issues on language variation, historical linguistics, and acquisition will be addressed as well. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive. This means that we will analyze what is actually spoken by people.

English 3373
Section 001,002

Modern English Syntax

Valerie Guerin

Interested in knowing more about the structure of Modern American English? Then, this class is for you! In this course, you will develop a better understanding of the grammar of English. Topics covered in this class include: prescriptive versus descriptive approaches to grammar, word structure and word formation, classification of words into parts of speech, and analysis of sentence structure. Although the material covered in the course is particularly relevant to English and education majors, the class is addressed to anyone interested in linguistic analysis.

English 3382
Section 001

Women Writers

Priscilla Ybarra

No description available. 

English 3385
Section 001

Shakespeare

Marliss Desens

No description available. 

English 3385
Section 002

Shakespeare
Shakespeare and Politics

Constance Kuriyama

In Shakespeare's England, policy was a word with a spectrum of connotations ranging from positive to neutral and descriptive to pejorative and negative. In this course we will be reading plays by Shakespeare, ranging from his earlier to his later works, which reflect his evolving, increasingly complex view of politics and politicians, in settings ranging from medieval England to ancient Rome to a symbolic utopian island. Plays covered will include Richard III, Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, Henry V, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest. The main text will be The Riverside Shakespeare. I will also assign selections from Machiavelli's The Prince.

English 3387
Section 003,004

Multicultural Literatures
Chicana/o Cultural Production

Priscilla Ybarra

This course tours Mexican American literature and Chicana and Chicano cultural production. Our studies consist of four units: Place in Mexican American Literature, Early Mexican American Literature, Emergence of Chicana/o Writing, and Contemporary Chicana/o Cultural Production. Course material draws from various genres and historical periods to exhibit the rich contribution that Mexican American and Chicana/o creative voices and lived experiences lend to U.S. and global culture.

English 3388
Section 001,002

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
The Classical Hollywood Style

Mike Schoenecke

For Spring 2009, English 3388 will study award-winning Hollywood films so that we can gain an understanding of what makes these films great and how these films communicate. By learning how the selected films communicate, we will gain a better understanding of how all films communicate. We will lay out contemporary Hollywood's most important and typical narrative strategies (which are in most respects the same as those in use during the 1930s) and then examine recent films to show how those strategies are used in practice. To accomplish these tasks, we will consider film language, the director's goals, and, when appropriate, the cultural and social milieu. We want to discover why Americans spent more than $25.8 billion on movie tickets alone last year. That's a lot of money just to hold hands, drink cokes, and eat popcorn in the dark.

English 3388
Section 003,004

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
Science Fiction Cinema

Allison Whitney

This course will approach science fiction cinema from multiple perspectives, encompassing political, aesthetic, feminist and historical approaches to studies of film genre. The goals of the course are to broaden students' knowledge of science fiction while also complicating their understanding of the concept of genre. Students will develop skills of formal analysis specific to film studies, explore a variety of theoretical approaches to cinema, and become familiar with less-studied issues in film history such as special effects and fan cultures. As a genre, science fiction is notable for the ways it expresses contemporaneous political and philosophical concepts, and students will be encouraged to question how film texts serve as expressions of larger cultural phenomena. Films may include Metropolis, The Day the Earth Stood Still, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Solaris, La Jetée, Alien, Terminator 2, The Matrix, and Sunshine.

English 3389
Section 001

Short Story
Short Stories from America and Around the World

Wendell Aycock

English 3389-001 is designed to explore the genre of the short story. We will begin our study of the genre by looking at some nineteenth-century examples and trying to see how they reflect the varying tastes of their eras and why they are still regarded as being excellent examples of the genre. After we move on to consider twentieth-century short stories, we will examine topics or themes that have interested short story writers. In our study of the short story, we will read works from various countries and try to determine what themes and topics are particularly well suited to the genre. We will, from time to time, ask what is distinctive about the short story. As time permits, we will see how some short stories have been changed into films and examine some methods of teaching the short story. Although we will read short stories written by a number of authors, we will also spend some time upon the works of Guy De Maupassant and Sherwood Anderson. In addition, we will devote some time to reading Latin American short stories.

English 3390
Section 001

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

This course fulfills the Multicultural requirement for TTU's Core Curriculum and is reading and writing intensive. It introduces students to a variety of texts from the region currently referred to as the American Southwest. We will explore several distinctive subcultures of the United States through traditional and contemporary Native American poetry and fiction, early and recent Anglo adventure writing, postmodern Chicano novels, and classic Southwestern nature writing. What common threads run through these works? Where do the visions and voices of authors collide or overlap? How is the sense of this region imagined across cultures, histories, and into a globalized future? We will attempt to answer these questions through class discussions, 6 close reading papers, 2 précis, and a formal analysis essay, as well as in-class presentations of selected programs from the radio documentary series “Writing the Southwest,” featuring interviews with some of this semester's authors.