Texas Tech University

Undergraduate Course Archive

Spring 2009 | 3000 Level

English 3302
Section 001, 002

Old and Middle English Literature
Old English: Monsters, Vikings, Miracles

Brian McFadden

This course will examine Old English literature (c. 730-1066) in the context of the major events of the period, the Viking invasions and the Benedictine reforms, which began to establish the idea of England as a nation and to define it as a “self” against foreign “others.” Genres will be Anglo-Saxon history (Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); saints' lives (Ælfric's Lives of Saints, the Life of St. Margaret) homilies and sermons (Ælfric, Wulfstan); allegory (Panther, Phoenix, Whale); riddles; heroic poetry (Beowulf, Judith, The Battle of Maldon, Dream of the Rood); elegies (The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Husband's Message, The Wife's Lament, Wulf and Eadwacer); and monster texts (The Letter of Alexander to Aristotle; Wonders of the East). We will also examine several Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts (Hali Meiðhad, Lanval, the Bayeux Tapestry, and some romances) to examine how the genres changed in England after the Norman Conquest. .

English 3302
Section 003

Old and Middle English Literature
Middle English Literature: Magic and Miracle, Heroes and Saints

Julie Nelson Couch

This course offers a survey of early English literature from circa 1066 to 1400 AD, from King Arthur to Chaucer, from chronicle to romance, from saints to merchants. In this course we will read literary works analytically, paying particular attention to the overlap between the genres of romance and saint's life. We will also explore the cultural contexts of early writings including their original placement in handwritten manuscripts. By the end of this course, the student should be able to mount an argument and support it effectively and correctly with textual evidence, both orally and in writing.

English 3305
Section 001,002

British Renaissance Literature
Survey

Lara Crowley

This course explores English poetry, prose, and drama composed between 1485 and 1660. From this “Golden Age” of English literature come some of our most celebrated authors, such as William Shakespeare, John Donne, and John Milton, and most famous English monarchs, such as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I—both writers as well. We will study works by these and other authors and the volatile political and religious contexts in which these texts were composed and disseminated in manuscript and/or print, sometimes without authorial intervention. While many works have been popular since inception, other works generated by writers who chose or were forced to avoid publication (such as certain women and English Catholics) have only recently garnered significant interest. Together we will analyze these texts and discuss issues that they raise, such as press censorship, the nature of desire, monarchical versus commonwealth rule, colonization and the New World, the relationship between the body and the soul, and the “purpose” of literature.

English 3307
Section 001,002

Restoration & 18th Century British Literature
Culture in the Marketplace

Marta Kvanda

How did we get our understanding of what constitutes Great Literature? This course will approach Restoration and eighteenth-century literature by exploring that question. Since the long eighteenth century is arguably the true beginning of the modern, we'll look at how the idea of what literature was changed over the period. At the beginning of the period, court culture and patronage still largely determined what was literary, but the growing influence of the print marketplace was already beginning to change that. From the interaction between the forces of high culture and the marketplace emerged our construction of Literature. We'll read a wide range of literary texts from the period that not only illustrate the major themes and movements but also illustrate the varying ways that writers thought about what they were doing. As we study these texts, issues, and ideas, you will develop an understanding of major British literary works of the eighteenth century and the historical and cultural contexts and influences that informed them; the ability to write with clarity, precision, and accuracy and to analyze and interpret literature; and the ability to conduct research carefully and systematically and to incorporate that research into your own interpretations of literature.

English 3308
Section 001

Nineteenth Century British Literature
The Weird Nineteenth Century

Bruce Clarke

During the nineteenth century in Great Britain, the high- and low-lights of “progress” threw many peculiar shadows. The British literary works we will read this semester captured a number of those darker hues: a traumatized mariner who wanders eternally, telling his uncanny tale; a misunderstood monster pieced together from cadavers; an explorer who discovers the underground world of an advanced civilization; a girl who discovers an underground world with a smoking caterpillar and a murderous queen; a scientist who transforms himself into a hedonist; a scientist who hunts vampires through hypnosis; a scientist who visits and then returns from the far future; and a colonial adventurer who puts shrunken heads on fence posts.

English 3308
Section 002

Nineteenth Century British Literature
Victorians' Secrets

Sean Grass

This course will introduce you to the major social, cultural, and literary events of the Victorian period in England. As Dickens wrote in A Tale of Two Cities, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”—a remark that really is true of life during 1837-1901, the sixty-four years during which Queen Victoria ruled. The Victorians gave us Dickens and Darwin, railroads and public schools, and key expansions of voting rights, personal freedoms, literacy, and social mobility. They also lived during a time when rapid urbanization and industrialization were destroying England's old agrarian society and driving the lower classes to poverty, crime, and despair. Literature is a window upon this complicated world, and we shall use our texts to see into Victorians' secrets: the material, psychological, and even sexual truths that shaped the Victorian age.

English 3309
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary British Literature

Jen Shelton

No description available. 

English 3324
Section 002

Nineteenth Century American Literature
Major Novels

John Samson

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the major authors and themes in 19th-century American novels. The course will also help students develop their skills in literary interpretation and analysis: to determine what details in a text are significant, to find and develop topics from the text, and to write analytical essays.

English 3337
Section 001

Modern and Contemporary World Literature
Trauma and Healing

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

This course will examine twentieth century fictions and some dramas. That address the twin terrors of war and unjust punishment. It will also uncover the healing antidotes to those terrors in art, nature, religion, relationship and work. A few of the literary selections contain all of these antidotes; all manifest some of them. We will read Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago about the Russian Revolution, Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front concerning World War I from the German soldier's viewpoint. We will read Naslund's Four Spirits set in Birmingham during the Civil Rights era, Bao Ninh's Sorrow of War by a North Vietnamese soldier, Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians about apartheid in South Africa, Allende's House of the Spirits set in the Chilean Pinochet regime, and Hosseini's The Kite Runner on the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Scot Simon's Pretty Birds will take us to Sarajevo in the eighties and Adams' Harbor to Algeria and to Boston in the early 2000's.

English 3351
Section 001

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Doug Crowell

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 002

Creative Writing
Genre: Fiction

Doug Crowell

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 003

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 004

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Curtis Bauer

No description available. 

English 3351
Section 005

Creative Writing
Genre: Non-fiction

Dennis Covington

This course is a workshop in creative nonfiction, a genre that, although fully factual, aims for the same effect that fiction does--the creation of what Henry James calls "a direct impression of life." You´ll be asked to write three article-length pieces of creative nonfiction.

English 3351
Section 006,0113

Creative Writing
Genre: Nonfiction

Jacqueline Kolosov-Wenthe

This is a reading and writing intensive introduction to creative nonfiction. Students will complete two to three essays of 6-10 pages as well as 6-8 brief essays or exercises between 2-4 pages in length. This course includes a service learning component in which all students will need to become involved in an outreach organization affiliated with Volunteer Lubbock. Opportunities will center on working with children or adults in a variety of contexts.

English 3351
Section 014,015

Creative Writing
Genre: Poetry

Diane Warner

Students in this class will learn basic poetic technique—alliteration, meter, simile and metaphor—by writing new poems throughout the semester. In the workshop environment the students will critique each other's work, offering intelligent and thoughtful advice and praise. I will make assignments (forms or topics), but students will generally write on topics that interest them. We will also be reading and discussing work by a variety of poets; they will be our models and our mentors. Resources from the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library will be used as topics for assignments, i.e. students will have the opportunity to write poems based on objects, photographs, or manuscripts from special collections.

English 3360
Section 001

Issues in Composition

Kevin Garrison

No description available. 

English 3365
Multiple Sections

Professional Report Writing

Staff

The purpose of English 3365 is to prepare you for writing as a professional person. It focuses on gathering information and presenting it to specific audiences. The assignments include a library/internet guide, an annotated bibliography, a recommendation report, a progress report, a proposal, and an oral report. You will learn uses, purposes, conventions, and structures for the reports and the proposal. You will also learn strategies for producing such documents, including analyzing purpose, gathering data, managing time, and revising. You will also develop your options, including visual and oral presentation and formatting verbal texts, for presenting information. You will review grammar and principles of effective style. All of your work will be on topics of your choosing, preferably related to your major or intended career.

English 3368
Section 002

World Wide Web Publishing of Technical Information

Craig Baehr

No description available. 

English 3369
Section 001

Information Design

Sean Zdenek

No description available. 

English 3371
Section 002

Linguistic Science

Min-Joo Kim

This course provides an introduction to the study of language at the undergraduate level. We will learn about the set of underlying principles of human language by analyzing the English language in detail and also looking at data drawn from other languages as well. The course will proceed around topics, which include word forms, sounds, sentence structure and meaning. Time permitting issues on language variation, historical linguistics, and acquisition will be addressed. Our approach will be descriptive rather than prescriptive, which means that we will analyze what is actually spoken by people.

English 3371
Section 003

Linguistic Science

Jay Williams

No description available. 

English 3373
Section 001,002

Modern English Syntax strong>

Jay Williams

No description available. 

English 3385
Section 001,002

Shakespeare
Shakespeare and Politics

Constance Kuriyama

No description available. 

English 3387
Section 003

Multicultural Literatures
Chicana/o Cultural Production

Priscilla Ybarra

This course tours Mexican American literature and Chicana and Chicano cultural production, and falls into four units: Place in Mexican American Literature, Early Mexican American Literature, Emergence of Chicana/o Writing, and Contemporary Chicana/o Cultural Production. Course material draws from various genres and historical periods to exhibit the rich contribution that Mexican American and Chicana/o creative voices and lived experiences lend to U.S. and global culture. This course serves to enhance student knowledge of multicultural literatures for a representative education in American literatures overall. Students will gain a familiarity with the development of Mexican American and Chicana/o literature and culture from 1848 to the present day.

English 3387
Section 005

Multicultural Literatures
African American Literature

Michael Borshuk

This section of 3387 will examine the development of African American literature from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to postmodern fiction at the turn of the twenty-first. We will begin with a discussion of critical approaches to African American literature, and then proceed chronologically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among our topics for interrogation and discussion will be: the influence of oral and musical traditions on the development of African American writing; the intervention(s) into traditional constructions of the American canon that black literature inaugurates; the ways that African American writers redress stereotypes and problematic representations of black Americans; and the “alternative” histories that African American literature proposes alongside America's dominant historical records.

English 3387
Section 006

Multicultural Literatures

Kanika Batra

No description available. 

English 3388
Section 002,003

Film Genres: Avant-Garde, Documentary, and Narrative
The Classical Hollywood Style

Michael Schoenecke

For Spring 2009, English 3388 will study award-winning Hollywood films so that we can gain an understanding of what makes these films great and how these films communicate. By learning how the selected films communicate, we will gain a better understanding of how all films communicate. We will lay out contemporary Hollywood's most important and typical narrative strategies (which are in most respects the same as those in use during the 1930s) and then examine recent films to show how those strategies are used in practice. To accomplish these tasks, we will consider film language, the director's goals, and, when appropriate, the cultural and social milieu. We want to discover why Americans spent more than $25.8 billion on movie tickets alone last year. That's a lot of money just to hold hands, drink cokes, and eat popcorn in the dark.

English 3389
Section H01

Short Story
Other People's Lives: A World of Short Stories

Wendell Aycock

You will need to contact the Honors College to enroll in this course.

English 3389-H01 is designed to explore the genre of the short story. We will begin our study of the genre by looking at some nineteenth-century examples and trying to see how they reflect the varying tastes of their eras and why they are still regarded as being excellent examples of the genre. After we move on to consider twentieth-century short stories, we will examine topics or themes that have interested short story writers. In our study of the short story, we will read works from various countries and try to determine what themes and topics are particularly well suited to the genre. We will, from time to time, ask what is distinctive about the short story. As time permits, we will see how some short stories have been changed into films and examine some methods of teaching the short story. Although we will read short stories written by a number of authors, we will also spent some time upon the works of Guy De Maupassant and Sherwood Anderson. In addition, we will devote some time to reading Latin American short stories.

English
Section

Course

Staff

No description available. 

English 3389
Section 002

Short Story
Culture, Crisis, Relationships

Ann Daghistany Ransdell

This course will provide the student with eleven basic short story forms, using the approach of Comparative Literature, which establishes the historical context for the form. It will begin with the Classical backgrounds of the short story and continue through the Medieval Period to the present. The goals of the course include a greater appreciation of story reading, as well as a wider array of story writing strategies and techniques. The development of the hero will be traced to its evolution within specific time periods and cultures. The student who benefits most from this class will arrive with a curiosity about the inter-relationships of art, culture and historical events that shape our lives.

English 3390
Section 001

Literatures of the Southwest

Sara Spurgeon

No description available.