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Spring 2011 Course Offerings

 

Quick Links:      Substitutions        Spring 2011 Honors Courses           Seminar Offerings

Substitution Opportunities for Upper-Level Honors Credit

(Six hours only of substitutions permitted per student)

STUDY ABROAD WAIVER

The Honors College believes strongly in the formative power of studying abroad.  Therefore, the Honors College offers a waiver of 3 hours of upper-level Honors course credits through the successful completion of a Study Abroad Waiver in conjunction with a study abroad program.  Through this process, students may earn a waiver for up to 3 hours of Honors non-seminar credit for a summer session, fall or spring semester abroad. Students who study for two semesters abroad (full summer, fall or spring) may earn a waiver for up to 6 hours of Honors non-seminar credit. Honors seminars may not be waived.  Studying abroad is a type of experiential learning which is most meaningful when accompanied by organized reflection.  The purpose of the Study Abroad Waiver is to provide opportunity for this reflection.  There are two components to the Study Abroad Waiver: an online journal and an academic reflective essay connecting student experiences abroad to a prescribed book read before leaving.  Students are not allowed to complete a Study Abroad Waiver to earn Honors credit during their final semester before graduation.  Contact Thomas Reynolds at 742-1828 for more information.

HONORS COURSE CONTRACT

Honors Contracting allows an Honors student to receive Honors credit for a non-Honors course by completing work above and beyond what is required of students in the course.  Only 3000 and 4000-level courses that meet face-to-face are eligible to be contracted. Graduate courses and cross-listed courses may also be taken for Honors credit. Contracting is not permitted during a student’s final semester before graduation.  See Donna Srader at the Honors College (742-1828) for more information and for an application to contract a course.

SPRING 2011 HONORS COURSES

FULL

ASTR 1401-H01   Stellar Astronomy           (CRN# 43132)                Prof. M. Clark           MWF 3:00 PM-3:50 PM

ASTR 1401-H51   Non-Credit Lab                 (CRN# 43133)                Prof. M. Clark          W 4:00 PM-5:50 PM

If you have to take a natural science course (which you do), wouldn’t you like to take one that mixes aspects of the entire universe into a single course? Learn things about who we are, why we are here, and  how we know so much about something so vast. The best part is that this course is designed to allow you to explore astronomy yourself by taking your own data, analyzing it, then incorporating it into things we discuss. You won’t have to take my word for it; you will be able to discover the universe for yourself. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

  FULL

ATMO 1300-H01   Intro. to Atmospheric Science      (CRN #25795)      Prof. D. Haragan   MW 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Co-requisite:  ATMO 1100 (any section)

Note: Due to some duplication of content, students who have taken Honors Integrated Science with an Atmospheric Science component are not eligible for this class.

A descriptive treatment of the science of the atmosphere in its modern dress.  Since all activity in the atmosphere is a response to solar energy, the course will begin with an introduction to radiation, atmospheric composition and the resulting heat balance of the earth-atmosphere system. This will be followed by consideration of the forces that control the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric motion.  Finally, the focus will shift to a discussion of contemporary issues related to atmospheric science such as global warming, environmental pollution, climate change, severe storms and weather modification. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

BIOL 1404-H01        Biology II                  (CRN# 39712)           Prof. Dini                  MW 2:00-3:20 PM                   

BIOL 1404-H51        Non-Credit Lab        (CRN# 39713)           Staff                          R 2:00-4:50 PM

Prerequisite: BIOL 1403 with a “B-“ or better; Enrollment in the Honors College              EXAMS T 6:00-7:30PM

Co-requisite:  BIOL 1404-H51

Fundamentals of organismal biology, population biology and biological diversity.  Second semester of an integrated course recommended for majors in biological and related sciences. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.     

 

CHEM 1308-H01      Principles of Chemistry II     (CRN# 25855)     Prof. Casadonte             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

CHEM 1308-701      Required Review Session      (CRN# 37059)                                             M 5:00-6:30 PM or

CHEM 1308-702                                                         (CRN# 37060)                                             T 5:00-6:30 PM

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307 with a “B” or better; Enrollment in the Honors College.                   Exams W 7:00-9:00 PM

Co-requisite:  any CHEM 1108; MATH 1351 or MATH 1331

Now that you have some of the basics under your belt, see how you can apply them to some more advanced aspects of chemistry, the world around you, and maybe even to your career.  This course continues what we started in CHEM 1307.  We will cover chemical kinetics (Why do reactions go at different rates?  What makes the processes of a diamond forming and a bomb exploding the same and different?), acid/base and ionic equilibrium (a must for medical school – ask anyone who has taken the MCAT), thermodynamics (great stuff for engineers), electrochemistry (it powers much in our lives), nuclear chemistry (a very relevant topic in this day and age), coordination chemistry (What makes compounds the colors that they are, anyway?  What is chirality?), and much, much more. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

CHEM 3306-H01      Organic Chemistry II                (CRN# 25859)          Prof. D. Birney      MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, 1107, 1308, 1108, 3305 with a "B' or better ; Enrollment in the Honors College

Co-requisite: CHEM 3106 strongly recommended.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify and predict reagents and products for the synthesis and reactions of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives and aromatic compounds, including regiochemistry and stereochemistry as appropriate.  2) Draw detailed mechanisms for representative examples of addition or addition/elimination reactions of carbonyl compounds and of electrophilic aromatic substitution.  3) Integrate their knowledge of reactions to propose new or modified reactions and multi-step syntheses and to relate these reactions to pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry applications.  4) Interpret NMR spectra of organic molecules. In other words, we'll learn how a variety of old and modern reactions are used to make complicated and useful organic molecules, both in biochemistry and in industrial applications. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

COMS 2300-H01     Public Speaking       (CRN# 25867)              Prof. D. Roach                       TR 8:00-9:20 AM

The purpose of COMS 2300 is to introduce students to the core concepts, principles, and practices of effective public speaking. The course takes a developmental approach of building on knowledge and skills of the most basic, general forms of public speaking toward more complex, specifically applied forms. Students will study, prepare, and deliver several formal presentations in this course.  Cognitive and skill development will be emphasized. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENT. 

FULL

ENGL 2307-H01    Intro to Fiction:                        (CRN #43030)                Prof. W. Aycock         TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                             Short Fiction Of the Americas                                 

Note: Bachelor of Science students may fulfill both Core Curriculum Humanities credit and Sophomore Literature credit with this course.

Note:  This course is not repeatable.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302

Insofar as literary history is concerned, the short story is relatively new.  It had its beginnings in the early 1900s, and, although many fine short stories were written during the nineteenth century, in the twentieth century the short story really flourished.  It has been particularly popular in the Americas.  By looking at selected short stories in Canada, the United States, and Latin America, readers can see how this genre of literature reflects the social struggles and literary interests of the countries in the Americas, right into the twentieth-first century.  Students will read stories by well known authors such as Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, and other Canadians; Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O’Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, Raymond Carver, Bobby Ann Mason, and other United States’ writers; and Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, José Donoso, and other Latin American writers.  In addition, students will explore works of more recent writers such as Amy Hempel and Russell Banks (U.S.), Ana García Bergua and Enrique Serna (Latin America).  Students will have the opportunity to study in depth the stories of a particular author (such as García Marquez’s collection Doce cuentos peregrines [Strange Pilgrims]), give an oral report to the class, and write an essay concerning the works.  Requirements will include two examinations, one short essay and one longer essay, and the final examination.  By studying short stories from the Americas, students may be able to see and understand some of the common challenges and connections that currently exist in the various countries.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF HUMANITIES CORE CURRICULUM CREDIT AND/OR A&S SOPHOMORE ENGLISH LITERATURE CREDIT.

FULL

ENGL 2391-H01    Intro to Critical Writing                 (CRN# 42246)            Prof. K. Caswell        TR 2:00-3:20 PM

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302

Join Professor Kurt Caswell on a journey through four genres and four worlds while mastering critical writing in ENGL 2391: Critical Writing. You'll explore Shakespeare's Othello; Ceremony, Leslie Marmon Silko's novel about a young American Indian war veteran; the Pulitzer Prize winning book about Iraq and Afghanistan, The Forever War by Dexter Filkins; and The Epic of Gilgamesh, the oldest story in the world. The course will focus on the writing process rather than content, and students will engage in meaningful discussion about these books toward this end. We'll build a dynamic, lively community of writers, and learn by sharing our work with each other. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND/OR SOPHOMORE LITERATURE REQUIREMENTS.



Cancelled

HDFS 4343-H01   Advanced Topics in HDFS:     (CRN# 43331)   Prof. S. Kulkofsky   TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

                            Child Development and the Law            SEMINAR

Recommended prerequisites: HDFS 2320 or PSY 1300

Children and adolescents often interact with the legal system as victims, witnesses, or perpetrators of crimes. In this course, we will examine how child development research can inform the legal system about best practices, policies, and judicial decisions regarding its interactions with children. Sample topics that will be covered include: How do children typically disclose abuse? Does the process of removing children from homes lead to further trauma and victimization? Do young children’s limited cognitive abilities impair their ability to provide accurate testimony? How do jurors perceive child witnesses? Does immature brain development make juvenile offenders less culpable for their crimes? Are children and adolescents at a greater risk of making false confessions? Readings will include a series of case studies as well as original empirical research articles. The course will take on a seminar format with weekly class discussions. Grades will be determined based on contributions to class discussion, responses to weekly thought questions, a final paper (Either research proposal or legal brief), a take-home midterm, and a final exam. This class is writing intensive. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HIST 1300-H01         Western Civilization I          (CRN# 43031)           Prof. J. Brink          TR 9:30 -10:50 AM

Note: Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must visit with Dr. Brink (jim.brink@ttu.edu) before receiving a permit.

This is a survey of Western Civilization from prehistory to the Age of Louis XIV.  It covers an ambitious span of time.  The intellectual goal for this course is equally ambitious.  In addition to understanding the place of history in the humanities, our purpose is to “know ourselves.”  We shall examine the roots and development of western institutions, religions, economies, and cultures.  We want to know the “who, what, when, where, how and why” of our mutual heritage.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HIST 2301-H01    History of the US Since 1877          (CRN# 25911)          Prof. J. Hart          MWF 12:00 -12:50 PM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 or HIST 2301 in any particular order.

HIST 2301 explores the major events, ideas and themes in U. S. history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.  No course that covers such a large chunk of time can claim to be comprehensive, and, indeed, neither does this one.  Each week we will explore a major subject or two.  The readings are designed to provide a broad overview of these subjects.  Lectures, by contrast, will use illustrative examples to draw your attention to particular themes in the readings.  There will also be weekly discussions that use a variety of media to clarify and expand upon these themes.  Because HIST 2301, as a "survey" course, covers such a large amount of material, one of the primary emphases will be upon helping you to develop the skills to distinguish essential information from the largely trivial.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE CORE CURRICULUM U.S. HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HIST 4373-H01      Tudor-Stuart England           (CRN# 36754)           Prof. G. Bell            TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

This course deals with enormous and seminal changes, in all aspects of human endeavor, that took place in England between 1485 and 1714.  It is essentially from this historical source that much of what we identify as “American” originated—our multiplicity of Protestant religions, our rich literary traditions and our specific government and constitutional assumptions/structures.  The course will also give some background in the medieval era, and it will spend as well a great deal of time developing a few of the issues that originated in the sixteenth/seventeenth centuries that are still with us today—such as the role of the church in society (and a discussion of why you believe the way you do), how a modern economy should be organized, or the role of individual rights as opposed to the need for the security of the state.  It will also focus on some of the out-sized personalities that this period produced, such as King Henry VIII, Queen Elizabeth I, William Shakespeare, Sir Walter Raleigh, Oliver Cromwell, and King Richard III. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 2311-H01       The Middle East         (CRN #40047)          Prof. M. Maqusi            MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

                                 In a Globalizing World                      SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

This course is aimed at offering an introductory study of contemporary Middle East issues, with particular reference to and emphasis on issues of cultural (including brief comparative readings of the three monotheistic religions), economic and socio-political reforms as well as contemporary developments of Middle Eastern international relations.

THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES, MULTICULTURAL AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

  FULL

HONS 2314-H01    Europe and Its Cinema             (CRN #40048)            Prof. C. Bradatan           M 6:00-8:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.  Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must visit with Dr. Bradatan (costica.bradatan@ttu.edu) before receiving a permit.

This interdisciplinary seminar proposes an introduction to the study of the European culture through the masterpieces of its cinema. We will look at some of the most significant social, political, cultural and intellectual developments in 20th and 21st century Europe as seen through works by major European directors: Serguei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Vittorio de Sica, Andrei Tarkovsky, Luis Buñuel, Theo Angelopulos, Ingmar Bergman, Roberto Rosselini, and others. We will consider their films interdisciplinarily: both aesthetically, as works of art in and for themselves, but also as “windows” (distorting and enriching at the same time) through which we can have access to the world that these works come from, to their social, political, intellectual and artistic contexts. Such masterpieces testify to the immense richness and complexity of cinema as a medium: an art film always reveals itself as a work of art, but it also speaks of wars and revolutions, anxieties and phantasms, major social upheavals, new philosophical ideas and artistic avant-gardes, scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS, MULTICULTURAL, AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.     

 

HONS 3300-H01    Individual Honors Research        (CRN# 40043)       Contact: Donna Srader   (806) 742-1828

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

  FULL

HONS 3301-H01    Science Fiction as Literature    (CRN# 26002)       Prof. P. Christiansen      TR 12:30-1:50 PM

SEMINAR          

A study of humanity and its possible futures, as represented in stories.  Texts will include "classic" science fiction novels and a collection of contemporary short stories.  The normal classroom format will be a "round table" discussion.  Grading will be based on brief class work assignments, one analytical paper, and a final project. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

  FULL

HONS 3301-H02       Philosophical Issues and              (CRN# 26015)        Prof. K. Ketner         TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                                 Problems in Human Caring              SEMINAR                                    

This course focuses upon a fundamental question: How shall I best live MY professional life? Originally designed for health pre-professionals, we now endeavor to ask this question in the context of any profession.  Class procedures feature intensive open discussions of short readings, keeping a journal (about one paragraph per class meeting), 4 hours of community service by student teams with a presentation by each team to the class, and a 10-page term paper (rewriting encouraged). THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H03     Seeing Films Philosophically       (CRN #26031)         Prof. C. Bradatan         T 6:00-8:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must visit with Dr. Bradatan (costica.bradatan@ttu.edu) before receiving a permit.

Philosophy is about deep questions such as God, suffering, solitude, alienation, loss, death, and meaninglessness. Cinema offers an excellent way of visualizing these issues, of fleshing them out in an expressive and immediately intuitive manner. This interdisciplinary seminar explores these topics through guided viewing of philosophically-minded films such as Hotel Rwanda, The Experiment, The Barbarian Invasions, Burnt by the Sun, Rashomon, Dogville, The Seventh Seal, Repentance, The Lives of Others. Film viewing will be enriched through reading from the works of major authors of the Western tradition such as Plato, Machiavelli, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, Jaspers, Ortega y Gasset, Solzhenitsyn, as well as Bible readings such as the Book of Job. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 3301-H04    The Literature of Travel       (CRN# 26037)         Prof. K. Caswell            TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                               And Adventure                      SEMINAR

Albert Camus wrote in his notebooks that “what gives value to travel is fear.” Apsley Cherry-Garrard asserts that travel is the physical expression of an intellectual passion. And Paul Theroux affirms that “travel is glamorous only in retrospect.” People travel for different reasons, so it follows that there are different kinds of travelers. We’ll investigate distinctions between travel and tourism, pilgrimage and quest. And of note, we’ll study the path of the hero—a psychological and spiritual journey toward self-mastery. We’ll study travel through a handful of great travelers (who are also great travel writers), and through film. Students are expected to engage in dynamic, heart-felt discussion, and write illuminating, well-developed travel essays. This class is reading and writing intensive. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HONS 3302-H01    Perspectives on Technology      (CRN# 26089)      Prof. M. Maqusi     MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                & Culture                              SEMINAR

This course is intended to help examine, in brief, the role of science and technology and their impact on our society. In particular, we explore, at some length, the impact of modern technology on social development and societal cultural changes. In this latter respect, particular reference is made to the roles played by IT-based technologies and the ever-evolving information revolution. Local as well as global perspectives are interjected in the course coverage. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

  FULL

HONS 3302-H02    Science and Society       (CRN# 43032)          Profs. G. Bell & T. Reid            T 6:00-8:50 PM

SEMINAR

This is the Honors seminar that examines some of the basic issues involved in the interplay that exists in our modern society between science and the general society in which it functions.  Taught by a practicing scientist and a constantly questioning historian, our focus is to dwell on some of the specific topics that have historically dominated science/societal interactions, such as:  What is science? What is the difference between science and technology? What contributions do scientists make to society and how does society respond to science? To what extent should society set the agenda for science? To what extent should science take social and political issues into account in their research programs? How should we evaluate conflicts between scientific findings and religious beliefs? What are the ethical implications of scientific developments such as the potential to reshape the human genome, to modify food crops and domestic animals genetically, or to use fetal stem cells to cure diseases?   This class is intended for both science and non-science students. The instructors of this course take the approach that scientific explanations for natural phenomena which have been proposed by scientists and evaluated by their peers (and which have been used repeatedly to create the technology that we take for granted in our daily life) provide the best understanding of our natural world, but there will be many opportunities for discussion, challenge, and interaction over all of these topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3304-H01    Music and Crisis           (CRN# 26134)             Prof. M. Berry                             TR 3:30-4:50 PM

SEMINAR

In this course, we will explore how different societies in different times and different places have used music to deal with periods of extreme crisis. The course will examine three historical moments: AIDS in the 1980s, the rise of West Coast rap, and music after 9/11. We will also consider a few individuals in light of the artwork they created in response to personal crises. We will look at how music was created, performed, and used by society both during and in the aftermath of these events. We will read accounts (primary and secondary) of these events and listen to pieces of music created in response to them.  We will discuss therapeutic uses of music performance and composition. Students will be asked to keep a journal over the course of the class that records their use of music in their daily lives, particularly in cases where they use music to deal with difficult situations. The class will culminate in a final written project that explores the relationship between music and crisis during an historical moment of the student’s choice. No reading knowledge of music or performing ability is required to succeed in this class.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

  FULL

HONS 3305-H01    Seminar in European Fine Arts    (CRN# 40049)       Prof. J. Brink      TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM  

SEMINAR

Note: This course is required for Honors Arts and Letters (HAL) majors.

This will be a sweeping survey of the major genres and examples of the fine arts from the Renaissance to the present.  We will explore personalities and creative work that have shaped the Western world,  from Leonardo DaVinci and Michelangelo Buonorotti, to Pablo Picasso and August Rodin, from Giovanni Palestrina to Benjamin Britten, from Michelozzo di Bartolommeo to Frank Lloyd Wright, from Molière and Jean Baptiste Racine to Oscar Wilde and Tom Stoppard.  We will examine and discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, music, dance, theatre, photography, and film, within their literary and cultural contexts.  In addition to group readings, viewings, listenings, and discussion, students will make both oral and written presentations on selections throughout the semester. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS REQUIREMENT AND 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HONS 4300-H01    Individual Honors Research           (CRN# 26158)     Contact: Donna Srader    (806) 742-1828   

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis/project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

  FULL

HONS 4301-H01          Constitutional Law              (CRN#43158)            Prof. R. Rosen             MTWR 8:00-8:50 AM

SEMINAR

First day of class will be Wednesday, January 12, 2011 in room 153 (Lanier Auditorium).

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5410.  Application to take this course is required. Applications are due Friday, October 29th in the Honors College. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only.  This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students.  Students subsequently admitted to the TTU School of Law will have this course waived from their law school degree plan provided a "C+" or higher is earned in the class.  Class commences one week earlier than TTU undergraduate classes.

A study of the federal judiciary’s doctrine and practice of judicial review; judicial power and the jurisdiction of the federal courts; the powers of Congress, including its power to regulate commerce; the power of the states to regulate commerce; the separation of powers; and the protection of private rights, privileges, and immunities under the Constitution, including the rights of due process, equal protection, freedom of expression, and freedom of religion. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HUM 2302-H01   The Western Intellectual Tradition II    (CRN# 26165)        Prof. C. Bradatan     TR 2:00 -3:20 PM

                            (Renaissance to 21st Century)

Note: This course is required for Honors Arts and Letters (HAL) majors.

Note: Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must visit with Dr. Bradatan (costica.bradatan@ttu.edu) before receiving a permit.

Why is a given literary, philosophical or artistic work considered “novel,” “innovative” or “revolutionary”? How is it that the new appears against a certain intellectual background? To what extent is novelty some “objective” characteristic, intrinsic to the work itself and to what extent is it the result of its interaction with the intellectual/artistic environment within which it emerges? What roles do extraneous factors (such as competition and demands of the market, political pressure/sponsorship, ideological and religious censorship) play in the genesis of novelty? What are the major patterns of intellectual and artistic change in the Western modern world? These are some of the questions that we will be addressing in the class. This interdisciplinary course proposes a close look at some of the intense “knots” of novelty in philosophy, literature, and the arts from Renaissance to our times, with the aim of bringing about a better understanding of how cultural history works and how the new is being produced. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES CREDIT.

 

MATH 1351-H01          Calculus I                (CRN# 43366)                 Prof. A. Solynin              TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with grade of B or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with grade B or better.

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals. Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts. In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered. Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.



MATH 1352-H01       Calculus II                  (CRN# 26209)                 Prof. E. Allen                  MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

MATH 1352-H02       Calculus II                  (CRN# 26212)                 Prof. R. Barnard            MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1351 with a grade of B or higher.

Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, applications.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2350-H01        Calculus III                 (CRN# 26214)                 Prof. M. Neusel               MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1352 with a grade of B or higher.

We will extend the ideas of integration and differentiation developed in Calculus I to functions of several variables. We will begin with partial derivatives and multiple integrals and then move to line and surface integrals.  We conclude with the famous Green's Theorem and Stokes's Theorem. One of the special features of this class will be the inclusion of online material through a WebCT supplement.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2360-H01         Linear Algebra           (CRN# 26219)                 Prof. R. Kirby                 MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1352 with a grade of B or higher.

This course will involve a balance of theory, application and computation.  The many uses of linear algebra will be emphasized in conjunction with the philosophy that serious applications of linear algebra require some computing capability.  To this end the course will involve significant use of MATLAB.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MATH 3350-H01      Higher Math for Engineers         (CRN# 26226)           Prof. R. Byerly     TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                                    & Scientists I

Note: This course does not provide credit toward a Math major.                                                                                

Prerequisite:  MATH 2350 with a grade of B or higher.

Ordinary differential equations.  Laplace transforms.  Other selected topics.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.

 

MATH 4000-H01   Biomathematics for Undergraduates     (CRN# 37054)     Prof. L. Allen        TR 9:30-10:50 AM

SEMINAR

Note: MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.

Prerequisites: MATH 3350 or MATH 3354

The goal of this course is to introduce students to mathematical modeling techniques in the life sciences. Students will learn how to formulate and analyze mathematical models by applying mathematical techniques studied in this course. The models will take the form of ordinary or partial differential equations, whose dynamics change over time and/or space. Students will learn: (1) to formulate differential equation models to describe population growth, competition, predation, and spatial spread, (2) to calculate steady-state solutions of the equations, (3) to apply methods for analyzing local and global behavior of the models, (4) to apply phase plane methods for systems of two ordinary differential equations, and (5) about the principles of bifurcation theory. Some classic and recent applications from the life sciences will be studied in detail, such as population growth with harvesting, drug treatment models, cellular dynamics of an infection within a host, predator-prey and competition dynamics, and spread of disease in a population. Textbook: An Introduction to Mathematical Biology by Allen. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT. 

  FULL

MATH 4000-H02   History of Mathematics        (CRN# 43033)         Prof. C. Seaquist         TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

SEMINAR

Note: MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.

Prerequisites: MATH 1351 or consent of instructor.

This course will present an overview of the history of Western mathematics from the Ancient Greece to the modern era. More specifically it will cover the development of three main subjects: arithmetic, geometry, and calculus. In examining arithmetic we will discuss the development of number systems, algorithms and devices for performing calculation, and the main applications that have promoted its growth including business, science, and number theory. In examining the development of geometry we will see how classical synthetic geometry led to the axiomatic method that replaced an ad hoc approach and how this development in turn led to a crisis in geometry that is still to be

resolved. Finally we will focus on how various ideas about measurement, which grew out of classical geometry, were eventually brought into harmony with the idea of number by Descartes, Dedekind, and others. Furthermore, we will study the ideas behind the development of the calculus by Eudoxus, Archimedes, Descartes, and Fermat. We will then show how these ideas came together under Newton and Leibnitz. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 
FULL

ME 2322-H01      Engineering Thermodynamics I         (CRN# 26202)           Prof. W. Oler            TR12:30-1:50 PM

Co-requisites: MATH 2350, PHYS 1408

The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (solid mechanics, statistics, and dynamics). Engineering Thermodynamics is the introductory course for the thermal sciences. Course topics include properties of pure substances, ideal gas behavior, first and second law analysis, and applications to energy conversion devices and thermodynamic cycles. Honors Thermodynamics I includes a supplementary thermodynamic system design project and extensive use of computer-aided parametric explorations of thermodynamic systems. Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.


FULL

MGT 4380-HS1      Strategic Management                (CRN# 26237)          Prof. C. Duran           W 2:00-4:50 PM

Prerequisites: Business students only who have completed BLAW 3391, ISQS 3344, FIN 3320, MKT 3350, MGT 3370, and MGT 3373 with grades of C or higher and are in their final semester. 

Strategic Management is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business administration students. This is an exciting, challenging course that focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students use all the knowledge and concepts acquired from prior business courses, integrate them with new strategic-management techniques, and use them to chart the future direction of different organizations. The major responsibility of students in this course is to make objective strategic decisions and to justify them through oral presentations and written case studies. This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily discussion based, but also has written components. Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course. This Honors course periodically contains a service learning experience and case. Service learning is an active learning technique that combines application of course concepts, interaction with a community partner, and reflective components. The students will have the chance to apply the strategic management concepts learned in this course in a real world setting. NO COBA CLASSIFICATIONS PERMITTED.

 

MKT 3350-HS1    Introduction to Marketing        (CRN# 26239)          Prof. D. Laverie       TR 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Prerequisite: BAUD or BA major; ECO 2301 or 2305

Introduction to Marketing is an overview of the field of marketing. The course covers principles, practice and strategies that drive successful marketing of products, services, people and ideas. In addition, ethical and global issues related to marketing will be covered. The course will be delivered through lectures and experiential learning. Students will be offered the opportunity to develop a marketing plan for a local agency as a service learning project.

 

MUHL 2301-703       Music as Cultural History I:        (CRN #44575)         Prof. T. Cimarusti     F 10:00-10:50 AM

                                     Honors Lab

Prerequisite: MUSI 1200 and permission of instructor (see Linda Gregston for permit)
Co-requisite: MUHL 2301-001

Music MUHL2301 is the first semester of a three-semester sequence on the history and evolution of style in music in the European tradition, spanning from the late Baroque period to the end of the nineteenth century. Our goal is to examine the cultural forces (philosophical, economic, social, and political) that helped shape music during this period. An examination of works by Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Chopin, and others will reveal how composers and their music are a reflection of the culture in which they live. Our goal then is to develop, sharpen, and employ critical thinking skills pertaining to music of the common practice period. Class and/or group discussions of assigned readings and listening excerpts and a final research project will provide students an opportunity to hone both oral and written skills.

 

MUHL 2303-703       Music as Cultural History III:          (CRN #43681)             Prof. C. Smith     F 11:00-11:50 AM

                                     Honors Lab

Prerequisite: MUSI 1200 and permission of instructor (see Linda Gregston for permit)

Co-requisite: MUHL 2303-001

In the “Long” 20th Century—that is, roughly from the height of the Industrial Revolution of the 1850s, through global conflicts, diasporas, and global consciousness, and continuing into the 1980s—the pace of musical change, and of music’s interaction with and reflection of complex cultural trends, quickened drastically. With the advent of new technologies from the cotton gin to the electric light to the Internet, composers’ and performers’ ability to develop new music, and audiences’ ability to consume that music, expanded as never before. Thus, the history of 20th century music in that same “Long” century is, in some key ways, a history of cultural change in Europe and the Americas. Understanding these contexts helps us understand their music; conversely, understanding that music helps us understand historical, political, social, and cultural change. In MUHL 2303, the capstone semester of a three-semester sequence on the history and evolution of style in music in the European tradition, we will build upon your experience (including MUSI 1200 and the Music Theory sequence), to develop informed, critical perspectives on what happened in this period, and why it happened. We will develop critical reading, listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in the overlapped fields of music and cultural history, and will deploy these tools in specially designed readings and group discussion, and in a research project which fulfills the Writing Intensive requirement.         

  FULL

EVHM 1302-H01   Introductory Fieldcraft     (CRN# 26242)     Prof. S. Tomlinson             W 2:00-4:50 PM

Note: All classes held outside after first day. This course is open to Honors and non-Honors students alike.

Special Course Fee: $125 to Outdoor Pursuits Center to cover costs of required field trips.

This EVHM course will focus on the way field skills and interpretation of landscape and environment are used in the natural history tradition.  We will cover keeping a comprehensive nature journal, identifying flora and fauna, mapmaking and orienteering, and the many ways technology and science affect society and the environment. Students will also learn to interpret and express their field experiences through writing and drawing. Weekly field trips and a camping trip to the Lesser Prairie Chicken Festival in Milnesand, NM are required. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE CREDIT.  

 

EVHM 3306-H01   Current Readings in Natural History      (CRN# 37042)     Prof. K. Caswell   TR 12:30-1:50 PM

SEMINAR

Current Readings explores the lives and work of contemporary nature writers. We’ll read about a diversity of landscapes (mountains, rivers, oceans, deserts, and the plains), and explore a diverse range of topics, including environmentalism, evolution, anthropology, Eastern philosophy, American Indian spirituality, travel, and a sense of place. We’ll write creatively too, short, focused essays which allow us to engage with places we know and places we want to know better. This course is reading and writing intensive. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

EVHM 3350-H01       Advanced Fieldcraft:      (CRN# 43034)        Prof. S. Tomlinson          T 2:00-4:50 PM

                              Sustainability And Community        SEMINAR

Special course fee to cover field trip costs: TBA

What is a “locavore?” Is wind power an entirely good thing or does it come with costs? What are victory gardens and why are they making a comeback? This course examines these questions and others as we explore what it means to live sustainably, particularly as it relates to the ecosystem of the semi-arid Southern High Plains. We will read about and discuss issues related to water in the west, energy, sustainable agriculture, gardens—both ornamental and food-producing, and how all of this fits into the environment and the culture of community. Students will take several field trips over the course of the semester to see various economically successful sustainable ventures. They will also learn to grow their own organic victory gardens. This course is writing intensive. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT FOR NON-EVHM MAJORS.

 

EVHM 4300-H01       EVHM Senior Portfolio                                (CRN# 26250)                 Contact: Susan Tomlinson

Senior portfolio class, independent study. EVHM majors and minors only. Students must see Dr. Susan Tomlinson for a permit.

 

PHYS 1408-H01           Principles of Physics I             (CRN# 38215)          Prof. R. Lichti             TR 12:30-1:50 PM

PHYS 1408-H51         Principles of Physics I Lab      (CRN# 40765)         Prof. R. Lichti            F 8:00 AM-10:50 AM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisites:  MATH 1351

Corequisites:  PHYS 1408-H51 or -507 Lab.

Calculus-based introductory physics course. Mechanics, kinematics, energy, momentum, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics.

The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

PHYS 2401-H01          Principles of Physics II           (CRN# 33817)         Prof. W. Glab          MWF 8:00-8:50 AM

PHYS 2401-H51          Principles of Physics II Lab     (CRN# 41373)        TBA                        R 11:00 AM-1:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisites: PHYS 1408, MATH 1352

Co-requisites: PHYS 2401-H51

Calculus-based introductory physics. Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and optics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.


H01 FULL
H02 FULL

POLS 2302-H01     American Public Policy            (CRN# 26258)          Prof. I. Leslie          TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

POLS 2302-H02     American Public Policy            (CRN# 37169)          Prof. I. Leslie          TR 12:30-1:50 PM

American residents and citizens are currently facing a number of important public questions. As members of the national community, we have a responsibility to engage in careful, public deliberation about the contemporary economic crisis, state and federal education policy, academic freedom issues, church and state separation debates, immigration policies, national security, increasing racial polarization, and anti-Arab and anti-Latino sentiment. In this course we will examine public policies pertinent to these issues and the political rhetoric that surrounds policy formation. The major assignments for this course are a research essay, and in-class presentation. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM POLITICAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

POLS 3300-H01    Selected Topics in POLS:               (CRN# 43135)          Prof. I. Leslie               TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                              African-American Political Thought              SEMINAR

Since the American Founding, African-American political thinkers have provided a critical counterpoint to mainstream, American public rhetoric.  In this course, we will discuss the distinctive contribution of black commentators to American political thought. We will analyze how the experiences of slavery and sociopolitical exclusion have influenced the ways black men and women have theorized the meaning of freedom in America. We will study the works of Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Toussaint L’Ouverture, David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Anna Julia Cooper, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B Dubois, among others. The major assignments for this course are a research paper and an in-class presentation. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

  FULL

PSY 4000-H01    Narratives of Mental Disorders          (CRN# 36958)          Prof. J. Clopton          R 2:00-4:50 PM

 SEMINAR

Note: Students must register for 3 hours of variable credit using hyperlink. No adds after first day of class.

Many individuals with mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, have written diaries and autobiographies.  Even though these narratives are often ignored by mental health professionals and by educators, they are so interesting to the general public that some of them have become bestsellers.  In this course, we will read and discuss a small sample of books written by individuals with mental disorders.  We will be reading about 100 to 200 pages each week.  Class participation and in-class writing assignments will be the basis for course grades.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

PSY 4324-H01        Cognition                         (CRN# 43134)                 Prof. J. Marsh                 TR 12:30-1:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Why did I forget my professor’s name? How did I not see that cyclist crossing the street? Why do I donate to some charities and not others? All of these questions circle around one greater point: What makes me think the way I do? This is the central question addressed by researchers in the field of cognitive psychology. This course provides an introduction to the field of cognitive psychology and the major research areas within it. Through lectures, discussions, and primary readings, we will explore the major theories within the fields of memory, attention, perception, decision-making, reasoning, and language. The goal of this course is to help students think critically about how our minds actually work. Students’ grades in this course will be determined by a combination of in-class exams, class discussion   participation, and a final paper project that will help students develop their own research ideas relevant to cognitive psychology. Students from all majors are welcome and encouraged to enroll. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

Spring 2011 Seminar Offerings

HDFS 4343-H01             Child Development and the Law TR 11:00AM-12:20PM   CANCELLED

HIST 4373-H01               Tudor-Stuart England TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM   FULL

HONS 2311-H01           The Middle East in a Globalizing World (Humanities and Multicultural Credit)  MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

HONS 2314-H01             Europe and Its Cinema (Visual & Performing Arts and Multicultural Credit) M 6:00-8:50 PM  FULL

HONS 3301-H01             Science Fiction as Literature (Humanities Credit) TR 12:30-1:50 PM  FULL

HONS 3301-H02             Philosophical Issues and Problems in Human Caring (Humanities Credit) TR 9:30-10:50 AM  FULL

HONS 3301-H03             Seeing Films Philosophically (Humanities Credit) T 6:00-8:50 PM          FULL    

HONS 3301-H04             The Literature of Travel and Adventure (Humanities Credit) TR 9:30-10:50 AM   FULL

HONS 3302-H01      Perspectives on Technology & Culture (Technology & Applied Science Credit) MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

HONS 3302-H02             Science and Society (Technology & Applied Science Credit) T 6:00-8:50 PM  FULL

HONS 3304-H01             Music and Crisis (Visual & Performing Arts)   TR 3:30-4:50    FULL

HONS 3305-H01             Seminar in European Fine Arts (Visual & Performing Arts Credit) TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM  FULL

HONS 4301-H01             Constitutional Law MTWR 8:00-8:50 AM

MATH 4000-H01             Biomathematics for Undergraduates 9:30-10:50 AM

MATH 4000-H02             History of Mathematics TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM  FULL

EVHM 3306-H01               Current Readings in Natural History TR 12:30-1:50 PM

EVHM 3350-H01               Advanced Fieldcraft: Sustainability T 2:00-4:50 PM

POLS 3300-H01             Special Topics in POLS: African-American Political Thought TR 2:00-3:20 PM

PSY 4000-H01               Narratives of Mental Disorders R 2:00-4:50 PM   FULL

PSY 4324-H01               Cognition TR 12:30-1:50 PM FULL