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Spring 2014 Course Offerings

Substitution Opportunities for Upper-Level Honors Credit

(Six hours only of substitutions permitted per student)

STUDY ABROAD WAIVER

The Honors College believes strongly in the formative power of studying abroad.  Therefore, the Honors College offers a waiver of 3 hours of upper-level Honors course credits through the successful completion of a Study Abroad Waiver in conjunction with a study abroad program.  Through this process, students may earn a waiver for up to 3 hours of Honors non-seminar credit for a summer session, fall or spring semester abroad. Students who study for two semesters abroad (full summer, fall or spring) may earn a waiver for up to 6 hours of Honors non-seminar credit. Honors seminars may not be waived.  Studying abroad is a type of experiential learning which is most meaningful when accompanied by organized reflection.  The purpose of the Study Abroad Waiver is to provide opportunity for this reflection.  There are two components to the Study Abroad Waiver: an online journal and an academic reflective essay connecting student experiences abroad to a prescribed book read before leaving.  Students are not allowed to complete a Study Abroad Waiver to earn Honors credit during their final semester before graduation.  Contact Lori Lightfoot or Sarah Timmons for more information.

HONORS COURSE CONTRACT

Honors Contracting allows an Honors student to receive Honors credit for a non-Honors course by completing work above and beyond what is required of students in the course.  Only 3000 and 4000-level courses that meet face-to-face are eligible to be contracted. Graduate courses and cross-listed courses may also be taken for Honors credit. Contracting is not permitted during a student’s final semester before graduation. Contact Lori Lightfoot for more information.

 

 

ACCT 2301-H01    Managerial Accounting        (CRN# 45940)                 Prof. D. Collins           TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Prerequisite:  ACCT 2300 and 3.0 GPA
Uses of accounting information for planning decisions about products and services, activities and processes, suppliers and customers, organizational subunits, and time periods as these relate to organizations in changing environments.

FULL

ANSC 4001-H01 SEMINAR Ethics in Research

 (CRN# 29100)                 Prof. S. Prien               W 6:00-8:50 PM

A discussion of ethical issues involving research, including topics of: an overview of ethics, conflicts of interest, plagiarism, data falsification, animal welfare and other topics of ethical concern pulled from current events. Reading assignments will be based on 1) reports of the incident in the popular press and 2) reports and commentary in the Scientific Journals, the latter may include review of the paper(s) triggering the controversy. We will also have three guest lecturers to specifically address topics of ethics in research involving humans, legal aspects of research and the ethics of interacting with industry.  Each student will also be required to write a paper on an ethical topic of the day. The paper will be written in a debate style with the student being required to champion both sides of an ethical argument. An interest in research is required.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

ASTR 1400-H01     Solar System Astronomy               (CRN# 47540)     Prof. M. Clark            MWF 3:00-3:50 PM
ASTR 1400-H51     Non-Credit Lab                                (CRN# 47576)    Staff                             W 4:00-5:50 PM

Solar System exploration is in the middle of exciting times.  There are more robotic explorers scouring the solar system now than ever before.  Join in this exploration while taking your natural science course.  Learn all about our nearest neighbors, and what makes the Earth unique in the solar system.  Study the latest missions and find out how to see the latest images even before the scientists do!  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

ATMO 1300-H01   Intro. to Atmospheric Science         (CRN# 25795)     Prof. D. Haragan       TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: Due to some duplication of content, students who have taken Honors Integrated Science with an Atmospheric Science component are not eligible for this class.
Corequisite:  Any section of ATMO 1100 Lab
A descriptive treatment of the science of the atmosphere in its modern dress.  Since all activity in the atmosphere is a response to solar energy, the course will begin with an introduction to radiation, atmospheric composition and the resulting heat balance of the earth-atmosphere system. This will be followed by consideration of the forces that control the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric motion.  Finally, the focus will shift to a discussion of contemporary issues related to atmospheric science such as global warming, environmental pollution, climate change, severe storms and weather modification. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

BIOL 1404-H01     Biology II                                           (CRN# 39712)     Prof. M. Dini                   MW 2:00-3:20 PM
BIOL 1404-H51     Non-Credit Lab                                 (CRN# 39713)     Staff                                R 2:00-4:50 PM

Exams T 5:30-8:00 PM
Prerequisite: BIOL 1403 with a B- or better                                                                                                                      
Co-requisite:  BIOL 1404-H51 Lab Fundamentals of organismal biology, population biology and biological diversity.  Second semester of an integrated course recommended for majors in biological and related sciences. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

CHEM 1308-H01   Principles of Chemistry II                 (CRN# 25855)     Prof. D. Casadonte        TR 9:30-10:50 AM
CHEM 1308-701    Required Review Session                 (CRN# 37059)     Prof. D. Casadonte         M 5:00-6:30 PM
CHEM 1308-702    Required Review Session                 (CRN# 37060)     Prof. D. Casadonte         T 5:00-6:30 PM

Exams W 7:00-9:00 PM
Prerequisite: CHEM 1307/1107 with a B- or better.

Co-Requisite: CHEM 1308-701/702, any CHEM 1108, MATH 1451 or AP Level High School Calculus course.

Now that you have some of the basics under your belt, see how you can apply them to some more advanced aspects of chemistry, the world around you, and maybe even to your career.  This course continues what we started in CHEM 1307.  We will cover chemical kinetics (Why do reactions go at different rates?  What makes the processes of a diamond forming and a bomb exploding the same and different?), acid/base and ionic equilibrium (a must for medical school – ask anyone who has taken the MCAT), thermodynamics (great stuff for engineers), electrochemistry (it powers much in our lives), nuclear chemistry (a very relevant topic in this day and age), coordination chemistry (What makes compounds the colors that they are, anyway?  What is chirality?), and much, much more. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

CHEM 3306-H01   Organic Chemistry II          (CRN# 25859) Prof. M. Fuertes   MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307/1107, CHEM 1308/1108, CHEM 3305 with a B- or better

Co-requisite: CHEM 3106 strongly recommended.
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify and predict reagents and products for the synthesis and reactions of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives and aromatic compounds, including regiochemistry and stereochemistry as appropriate.  2) Draw detailed mechanisms for representative examples of addition or addition/elimination reactions of carbonyl compounds and of electrophilic aromatic substitution.  3) Integrate their knowledge of reactions to propose new or modified reactions and multi-step syntheses and to relate these reactions to pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry applications.  4) Interpret NMR spectra of organic molecules.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

COMS 3358-H01  Business and Professional Communication  (CRN# 45931)  Prof.  D. Roach TR 8:00-9:20 AM

This course is designed to introduce you to basic skills, principles, and contexts of communication in business and professional settings. Verbal and nonverbal elements of oral communication are emphasized. Practice is provided in skills and principles associated with presentations, interviews, and meetings. The course fulfills the Oral Communication component of the University's General Education requirements. The course is based on research evidence and business trends indicating that in addition to fundamental effectiveness in communication skills, quality presentation-making is one of the most prevalent and important job tasks in careers today. In light of this, presentation assignments in the course stress basic skills of idea generation, message development, and message delivery.   THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENT.

FULL

ECO 2302-H01  Principles of Economics II                   (CRN# 25872)       Prof. R. Al-Hmoud  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM      

Note: ECO 2301 not required before 2302
This is the second course in a two-course sequence introducing students to the principles of economics. This study of macroeconomics looks at the entire economy and the aggregates or total levels of income, employment, and output that measure the performance of the whole economy. To understand how the economy works, this course provides a blend of economic theory, institutional material, and real-world applications. The determinants and policy implications of short-term fluctuations in output and long-term economic growth are discussed. A large portion of class time will be used to discuss related questions in which you might be interested. Also, due to the nature of this course, a good part of each class will be reserved to discuss many contemporary events that are related to macroeconomic theory and policy. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR REQUIREMENT.

 

ECO 3333-H01  International Economics         (CRN# 36724)     Prof. M. Rahnamamoghadam     MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: ECO 2301 and ECO 2302
At the start of the twenty-first century, international aspects of economics remain as important and controversial as ever.  Concerned individuals, including, of course, college students, can hardly avoid a passing acquaintance with such newsworthy events as the long-standing American trade deficits, the ongoing controversies associated with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), monetary union in Europe, intellectual piracy in China, etc.  International economics uses the same fundamental methods of analysis as other branches of economics to analyze the root causes of all these controversies.  The subject matter of international trade, then, consists of issues raised by the special problems of economic interaction between sovereign states.  In this course, we will develop several standard models in international trades such as the comparative advantage theory of trade and trades according to the relative availability of resources.  The models then can be used to analyze the pattern of trade, the gains from trade, and the effect of an international trade on distribution of income within each trading country.  In the process, it is our hope that after taking this course, you will be better able to answer many of the above raised questions and understand how international trade affects our country, and that you will know how to evaluate the implications of government policies that are undertaken to influence the level and direction of international transactions.

FULL

ENGL 2307-H01    Introduction to Fiction: Short Stories from Around the World: A Comparative Approach

(CRN# 43030)     Prof. W. Aycock             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: Bachelor of Science students may fulfill both Core Curriculum Humanities credit and Sophomore Literature credit with this course. This course is not repeatable.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and 1302

During this semester, English 2307, “Studies in Fiction,” will feature five different approaches to the study of fiction, involving both short stories and novels.  First, students will read early examples of short fiction from the nineteenth century, such as those created by Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, and Melville.  The second part of the course will involve short fiction from the end of the nineteenth century, especially the works of Guy de Maupassant.  The third part of the course will involve the rise of the detective story, with works of Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Agatha Christie.  This portion will also feature Conan Doyle's novel The Hound of the Baskervilles and a film version of the work. The fourth part of the course will feature notable short stories from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. During the final part of the course, students will read two novels, García Márquez's Love in the Time of Cholera and Louise Erdrich's The Round House.  Students will be required to write two essays (or one essay and one oral report), write a research essay, and take a mid-term exam and a final exam. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND/OR SOPHOMORE LITERATURE REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

ENGL 2391-H01  Introduction to Critical Writing             (CRN# 42246)     Prof. K. Caswell     TR 12:30-1:50 PM  

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302
Join Professor Kurt Caswell on a journey through four genres and four worlds while mastering critical writing in ENGL 2391: Critical Writing. You'll explore Shakespeare's Othello; Ceremony, Leslie Marmon Silko's novel about a young American Indian war veteran; the Pulitzer Prize winning book about Iraq and Afghanistan, The Forever War by Dexter Filkins; and The Epic of Gilgamesh, the oldest story in the world. The course will focus on the writing process rather than content, and students will engage in meaningful discussion about these books toward this end. We'll build a dynamic, lively community of writers, and learn by sharing our work with each other.  This class is reading and writing intensive.THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANTIES CREDIT.

 

ENGL 3382-H01 SEMINAR Women Writers: Pain & Hysteria In Gothic Literature

(CRN# 49126)  Prof. M. Purinton  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM  

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 AND 6 hours of 2000 level English courses.

In this seminar, we will read British Gothic literature written by women from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries that explores anxieties associated with bodily pain and mental anguish, often figured as grotesques and ghosts. We will poke and prod into haunted and isolated castles; we will inspect trap doors, secret passageways, labyrinth tunnels; we will creep into the crypts, graveyards, cloisters; and we will sojourn through the threatening forests and exotic landscapes in search of potential meanings for the pain and hysteria we encounter.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

ENGR 2392-H01  Engineering Ethics and Its Impact On Society  (CRN# 47745)  Prof. W. Marcy     MWF 9:00-9:50AM  

In the honors section of ENGR 2392 (formerly ENGR 4392), students will be expected to explore important ethical concepts and current engineering issues in-depth.  Assignments and discussions will focus on the connection between conceptual analysis and day-day engineering practice.  Students will be asked to describe the nature and extent of their obligations as engineers.  Contemporary challenges in engineering practice will be explored along with methods of ethical analysis.  Students should walk away with a better appreciation of the ethical foundations of engineering as well as with useful tools (such as the cross-impact analysis) for ethical analyses.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANTIES REQUIREMENT.

FULL

EVHM 1302-H01   Introductory Fieldcraft      (CRN# 45824)                 Prof. S. Tomlinson         R 2:00-4:50 PM  

Note: All classes are held outside after first day. This course is open to Honors and non-Honors students alike. Special Course Fee: $125 to Outdoor Pursuits Center to cover costs of required field trips. This EVHM course will focus on the way field skills and interpretation of landscape and environment are used in the natural history tradition. We will cover keeping a comprehensive nature journal, identifying flora and fauna, mapmaking and orienteering, and the many ways technology and science affect society and the environment. Students will also learn to interpret and express their field experiences through writing and drawing. Weekly field trips and a camping trip to the Lesser Prairie Chicken Festival in Milnesand, NM are required. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE CREDIT.

 

EVHM 3306-H01 SEMINAR Current Readings in Natural History

(CRN# 45819)                 Prof. K. Caswell             TR 2:00-3:20 PM

Did you know that Texas Tech houses one of the most important and extraordinary collections of natural history papers in the world? This class explores the lives and work of contemporary nature writers whose archival papers are housed here in the Southwest Collections/Special Collections Library. We’ll read four books by writers whose work is part of this collection and in doing so, explore a diversity of landscapes (mountains, rivers, oceans, deserts, and the plains), and cover a diverse range of topics, including environmentalism, evolution, anthropology, Eastern philosophy, American Indian spirituality, travel, and a sense of place. We’ll spend time in the archive conducting independent research, and write both critically and creatively. Three of the writers we read will be visiting campus in April for a major conference centered on the archive. This course includes a required weekend field experience with Barry Lopez. This course is reading and writing intensive.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

EVHM 3350-H01 SEMINAR

Advanced Fieldcraft: Prairies and Rainforests     (CRN# 45822)       Prof. M. McGinley         TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

The effects of the current drought in Texas have reinforced how strongly physical factors can influence the ecology and society of a region.  This course will examine how the physical environment influences ecological, historical, societal, and environmental issues.  We will contrast two distinctly different parts of the world: our local region, the semi-arid High Plains of Texas, and the wet, tropical region of South East Asia.  Students will work to develop educational materials that will be on public display.  Students in this course will also participate in the Encyclopedia of Earth's (EoE: http://www.eoearth.org/) Student Science Communication Project.  See an example of published student work at http://www.eoearth.org/article/Rivers_of_Texasand develop material for the South East Asian Bat Conservation Research Unit (http://www.seabcru.org/) This course is writing intensive, as students will write articles that will be submitted for review for inclusion in the EoE and SEABCRU website.   This course will include local field trips (but unfortunately, no trips to the rainforests).  This course may be repeated for credit with approval from EVHM program director.THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT FOR NON-EVHM MAJORS.

FULL

HIST 2300-H01      History of the US to 1877        (CRN# 25904)     Prof. R. Verrone            MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 before taking HIST 2301.
This course will introduce students to the major problems and themes in U.S. History from 1492 to Reconstruction.  We will look closely at the founding documents and primary sources of information, with emphasis on important figures. There will be an assortment of readings, papers, discussions and tests throughout the semester.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM U.S. HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

 

HIST 2301-H01      History of the US Since 1877        (CRN# 25911)     Prof. K. Williams           TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: You need not take HIST 2300 before taking HIST 2301.
This course is designed as an introduction to U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction in 1877 to the first decade of the twenty-first century. This class will highlight important themes, especially the broad issues of social, political, and cultural conflict, and in particular, problems of race, class, gender, imperialism, and political party shifts. The emphasis in this class will be on history from the "bottom up,” which means that we will generally focus on the daily struggles of ordinary people rather than the lives and thoughts of politicians and other public figures (although both groups will play a role in our analysis). We will use this “bottom-up” approach to explore what it means to be “American,” and how that definition changes over time and space. It is my idealistic hope that you will leave this course at the end of the semester with a real sense of the how historical trends and events have affected the world around you—in other words, by the end of the semester, you should be able to use the history that we discuss to understand today’s national news.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM U.S. HISTORY REQUIREMENT. 

 

HIST 3337-H01 SEMINAR Science in American Society

(CRN# 49832)                 Prof. G. Bell & T. Reid          T 6:00-8:50 PM

This is the Honors seminar that examines some of the basic issues involved in the interplay that exists in our modern society between science and the general society in which it functions.  Taught by a practicing scientist and a constantly questioning historian, our focus is to dwell on some of the specific topics that have historically dominated science/societal interactions, such as:  What is science? What is the difference between science and technology? What contributions do scientists make to society and how does society respond to science? To what extent should society set the agenda for science? To what extent should science take social and political issues into account in their research programs? How should we evaluate conflicts between scientific findings and religious beliefs? What are the ethical implications of scientific developments such as the potential to reshape the human genome, to modify food crops and domestic animals genetically, or to use fetal stem cells to cure diseases?   This class is intended for both science and non-science students. The instructors of this course take the approach that scientific explanations for natural phenomena which have been proposed by scientists and evaluated by their peers (and which have been used repeatedly to create the technology that we take for granted in our daily life) provide the best understanding of our natural world, but there will be many opportunities for discussion, challenge, and interaction over all of these topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 1304-H01 SEMINAR

The Superhero in Film, Television, And Popular Culture       (CRN# 25938)                 Prof. R. Weiner  M 6:00-8:50 PM

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.
With the release of the X-Men movie in 2000, superhero films have become the model for what a “summer blockbuster” should be, especially in the last decade. In 2012, The Avengers broke records and became one of the most popular films of the year. Domestically, two superhero films, The Avengers (2012) and The Dark Knight (2008), are numbers three and four, respectively, in the list of all-time top-grossing films. Hollywood producers now comb Comic-Con searching for properties to film.  However, the superhero feature film as a distinct genre didn’t exist as we know it 30 years ago. This course will look at the history of the superhero in film and its rise as a distinct genre in popular culture. Topics include early superhero films and serials, gender and superheroes, franchise reboots, sequel exhaustion, and issues of adaptation. We will also look at the history of superheroes in television, including live action and animation, as well as popular culture in general. Through reading, discussion, lecture, and viewing of selected films, students should gain an understanding of how the superhero is different from other heroes in literature and film. We will also analyze the role of the super-villain.  Please note this course will be reading and writing intensive.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 1304-H02 SEMINAR Analyzing Popular Music: Theory and Practice

(CRN# 50176)           Prof. T. Cimarusti         TR 12:30-1:50PM

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

Music  . . . . rap, rock, hip-hop, metal, jazz? Have you always wanted to understand how the music that YOU listen to works? Can you articulate in musical terms why your favorite popular song/artist resonates with you, your beliefs, your values? And how do popular music composers construct their music in order to heighten the meaning of their message? This course will begin with an introduction to music theory, providing students not only the ability to read and write music, but to understand the varied approaches to musical composition and their meaning in contemporary pop music. The second half of the course will focus on the analysis of both assigned popular songs and those that are particular favorites among students. As a direct reflection of popular culture, subculture, and current events, popular music provides insight into values, issues, and social, political, and economic factors, cultural/personal identities. We will consider issues of musical change, globalization and hybridization, music as a populist expression and political protest, and the influence of technology, the recording industry, and marketing (e.g., album covers, music video, etc). Such issues will be explored through directed reading and listening assignments, written assignments, field assignments, mini-presentations of musical analyses, and focused class discussion. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 2314-H01 SEMINAR Latin American Cinema

(CRN# 40048)                 Prof. G. Elbow                W 6:00-8:50 PM

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.
What can we learn about a place from its movies?  Find out the answer to this question, learn how to watch and evaluate films, and practice your Spanish and/or Portuguese comprehension, all while watching some of the best movies Latin America has produced.  Films that will be viewed are from many different Latin American countries, but especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico, which are the region’s most important film producers.  Films are in Spanish or Portuguese with English subtitles.  Don't expect many happy endings, but you will get an insight into the history, culture, and politics of some of Latin America's most important countries. Instead of exams, grading is based on short essays (about 1000 words) that evaluate the aesthetic elements (use of cinematography, costume, setting, musical score, dialogue, color, etc.) of the films and comments on social, political, and cultural context as appropriate.  Essays are due each week after the first week of the semester. In addition, you will be asked to join a group of 4 or 5 students to work on a film scenario or script that elaborates on a theme from one or more of the films viewed during the semester.  On the last day of class each group will do an oral presentation of their scenario or script along with a written copy. Warning: Latin Americans have different attitudes than North Americans when it comes to what is shown on film. Some of the films that will be shown in class contain nudity, explicit sex and prostitution, violence, and homosexuality.  Knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese is helpful but not necessary to enjoy this course and receive a good grade.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS, MULTICULTURAL, AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 2314-H02 SEMINAR Europe and Its Cinema

(CRN# 49968)                         Prof. C. Bradatan           T 6:00-8:50 PM

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

This interdisciplinary seminar proposes an introduction to the study of the European culture through the masterpieces of its cinema. We will look at some of the most significant social, political, cultural and intellectual developments in 20th and 21st century Europe as seen through works by major European directors: Serguei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Vittorio de Sica, Andrei Tarkovsky, Luis Buñuel, Ingmar Bergman, Roberto Rosselini, Emir Kusturica, and others. Consistent with the Honors College’s philosophy, we will consider their films interdisciplinarily: both aesthetically, as works of art in and for themselves, but also as “windows” (distorting and enriching at the same time) through which we can have access to the world that these works come from, to their social, political, intellectual and artistic contexts. Such masterpieces testify to the immense richness and complexity of cinema as a medium: an art film always reveals itself as work of art, but it also speaks of wars and revolutions, anxieties and phantasms, major social upheavals, new philosophical ideas and artistic avant-gardes, scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS, MULTICULTURAL, AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.    

 

HONS 3300-H01    Individual Honors Research     Contact: Honors Associate Dean     (806) 742-1828   

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis project application on file.
Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Associate Dean.

FULL

HONS 3301-H01 SEMINAR Shakespeare’s Violent Men

(CRN# 26002)                 Prof. K. Caswell             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Men make war. And men – not women – commit violent crimes. In the United States, almost 90% of all homicides are committed by men. Shakespeare's men are no different. Indeed, they are some of the most violent characters in literature. In Troilus and Cressida, Ulysses claims that the masculine appetite for violence and war is a "universal wolf" that will at last "eat up himself."  This course explores Shakespeare’s tragic plays and their treatment of masculine violence. We will work with Macbeth, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, King Lear, and The Tempest. We will also address the universal themes of ambition and human endurance, fatal desire and sublimation, family heritages and dynamics, as well as the wish to live forever. We’ll work with films of most of the plays, and read aloud in class often.  This class is reading and writing intensive. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H02 SEMINAR Philosophical Issues and Problems In Human Caring

(CRN# 26015)      Prof. K. Ketner               TR 9:30-10:50 AM

This course focuses upon a fundamental question: How shall I best live MY professional life? Originally designed for health pre-professionals, we now endeavor to ask this question in the context of any profession. Class procedures feature intensive open discussions of short readings, keeping a journal (about one paragraph per class meeting), 4 hours of community service by student teams with a presentation by each team to the class, and a 10-page term paper (rewriting encouraged).  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H03 SEMINAR Philosophical Filmmakers: Bergman, Kurosawa, Kieslowski

(CRN# 26031) Prof. C. Bradatan W 6:00-8:50 PM

Should philosophy be the monopoly of “professional” philosophers alone? Can philosophical questions be raised, and answers attempted, through other means of expression than the traditional ones (i.e., academic books and journal articles)?  If they can, and if, furthermore, “the medium is the message,” then how exactly does the adoption of non-conventional forms of expression (art cinema, for example) change the philosophical content itself?  How do artists and thinkers, brought up in different cultures come to tackle the same set of “universally human” issues such as death, finitude, solitude, quest for meaning?  This interdisciplinary course seeks to answer such questions through an in-depth discussion of the oeuvres of three major 20th century filmmakers: Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) and Krzysztof Kieslowski (1941-1996).  Films such as The Seventh Seal (1957) and Wild Strawberries (1957), by Bergman; Rashomon (1950) and Dersu Uzala (1975), by Kurosawa, Blind Chance (1981), and The Decalogue (1989-1990), by Krzysztof Kieslowski, have always struck viewers as intensely philosophical. We now have a chance to develop this perception into a more articulated understanding. For this purpose, we will be using not only scholarly literature dedicated to these films and directors, but also works of philosophy and literature by such authors as Nietzsche, Camus, Tolstoy, Unamuno, Rorty, Žižek and others.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H04 SEMINAR

U.S. Women’s History: Founding Mothers, Freedom Fighters, and Fish Without Bicycles

(CRN #50178)                 Prof. K. Williams          TR 12:30-1:50 PM                                 
                                     
A famous historian once said, “Well-behaved women rarely make history.” The subfield of Women’s History seeks to remedy this problem by incorporating women into the traditionally male narrative of American history. Although they are often left out or given only token inclusion, women are integral to the story of building this nation, and their experiences reveal an entirely new perspective on the familiar stories that are a part of our culture. This course is designed to teach you the historical narrative of the United States through the eyes of past women, using primary documents from each era we discuss, and through the eyes of historians who study these women, using secondary sources that provide an academic perspective and a broader context. Each week in this course, we will read and discuss both kinds of sources in an attempt to understand how United States History might look significantly different if viewed through the eyes of its female participants, and why such a perspective might matter to twenty-first century students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H05 SEMINAR Booms, Busts, and Dust: Writings about Texans and their Land

(CRN# 40513)   Prof. K. Baake   TR 12:30-1:50 PM

This course will examine historical and present day writings about Texas culture and its environment, particularly relating to the oil industry, water issues, and agriculture. We will examine various writing genres to ask how Texans and non-Texans have understood the state’s unique business and environmental history. Course material will include novels in which Texas farmers and ranchers face drought and other hardships, a memoir of a young girl growing up in the oil fields, folk tales and songs, and essays and magazine articles about the rise and fall of several colorful and notorious Texas businessmen. We will also consider reports and planning texts that look toward future environmental challenges that Texans face. Students will participate in class discussions and write response papers to the literary, technical, and historical documents, as well develop a research project of their choosing.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H06 SEMINAR Heroic Lives

(CRN #50179)                 Senator B. Krueger      MW 3:00-4:20 PM

This course seeks to explore how exceptional men and women have significantly influenced the lives of millions of people, in their own and later generations, for the benefit of society.  We shall study the character, behavior, and development of these figures to assess whether there are unifying or repetitive patterns among them.  Further, why did these figures rise above others of their time to merit attention and study in the 20th and 21st centuries?  Most important, however, is to ask ourselves:  What can we learn from these heroic figures that we, as private individuals and as public citizens, can absorb or emulate in order to lead richer, fuller lives and contribute positively to our own and future generations?  The class will focus on a different historical figure each week.  The class will be led by a professor experienced in teaching university courses concerning domestic and foreign governmental policy.  He has served as a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Texas, and as a U.S. Ambassador to three different nations, and as Special Representative of the U.S. Secretary of State to the fourteen nations of the Southern African Development Community. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3302-H02 SEMINAR Early Clinical Experience

(CRN# TBA)      Prof. L. Johnson          MW 1:00-1:50 PM, W 2:00-4:50PM

Note: Application to take this course is required.  Early Clinical Experience Applications are due Friday, October 25th to Sarah.Timmons@ttu.edu in the Honors College. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only.  Eligible students must have junior standing by hours or be May/August/Dec 2015 TTU graduates (as shown on the Tech system) with steady progress made toward completion of medical school science requirements. Sophomore and senior applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Students must submit to a criminal background check and will need to pass a TB test prior to entry in the class.
This course block provides the framework for Pre-Med students to learn the fundamental concepts of the various roles and responsibilities of physicians. Learning occurs in several settings including classroom instruction, small group forums, and clinical settings.   The students also explore ethical, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of clinical care through these various learning settings. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CIRRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3304-H01 SEMINAR Bones, Botanicals, and Birds

(CRN# 26134)                 Prof. S. Tomlinson         T 2:00-4:50 PM

John James Audubon used to wander the countryside for weeks on end, looking for new birds to paint. This is common knowledge, but did you know that when he found the birds he wanted, he shot them and used wire armatures to pose their lifeless bodies into incredibly dynamic scenes—and changed the face of natural history illustration forever. Well, we won’t be doing any of that in this course (either wandering around shooting birds or changing the face of illustration forever), but we will be learning to illustrate the natural world. We may even hear more ―inside‖ stories about Audubon and other natural history illustrators in the process. This course is an introduction to basic nature and science illustration techniques, ranging from initial sketches in the field and lab to final product in the studio. Students are expected to draw and paint, but do not need artistic ―talent‖ to benefit from—or enjoy—this course. If you have an interest in drawing, nature, or both, this is definitely the course for you. And if you have always thought you could not draw a stick, let alone a bone, beetle, or bird, then this is also the course for you! Prepare to be surprised at what you can do. Required field trips.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3304-H03 SEMINAR The American Musical As Social Document

(CRN# 45854)                 Prof. D. Chansky          TR 9:30-10:50 AM

The musical is arguably the most American of theatre forms. This class investigates important social issues, problems, causes, and tensions that are present in a genre too often dismissed as “just entertainment.” If you love musicals you should probably already recognize how many deal with race (Show Boat, Finian’s Rainbow, Caroline or Change); politics (Of Thee I  Sing, Let ‘em Eat Cake); prejudice (South Pacific, West Side Story); history (1776, Pacific Overtures, Ragtime; Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson), personal problems requiring therapy  (Lady in the Dark; Next to Normal); Criminals and the legal system (Assassins, Chicago, Parade) and “commitment issues” (Company). The musical is also a genre in which tough, strong women can be the rule as much as the exception (Gypsy, Funny Girl, Call Me Madam, Wicked). In this class we will begin with a recent musical and some critical reading in order to gain an understanding of the intersections between social pressures, story, characters, and music. From there, we will loop back to the early part of the twentieth century and proceed chronologically to return to the present, concluding with the 2010 Broadway production of Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson as a postmodern, hip, rock look at a nexus of social issues that are both historical (the obvious subject of the show) and present-day (all the connections it is meant to summon). THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3304-H04 SEMINAR Intersections of Film and Dance

(CRN# 47447)                Prof. A. Duffy               MW 9:30-10:50 AM

This course is an overview of the ways in which dance and film influence each other and work in tandem to create complex meaning and understanding, beginning with examples from the 1960s and progressing to current trends.  In doing so, this course will expand the student’s knowledge of the human condition and human cultures as expressed and evidenced through the art form of concert dance, performance art, multimedia art works, and film.  Students will engage in observing dance in video format, critically reading and writing about performance, discussing the various art forms, and exploring performance criticism.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3305-H01 SEMINAR Seminar in European Fine Arts

(CRN# 43997)                Prof. J. Brink                  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Note: This is a required course for all HAL majors. Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must visit with Dr. Brink before obtaining a permit. (jim.brink@ttu.edu)
This will be a sweeping survey of the major genres and examples of the fine arts from the Renaissance to the present. We will explore personalities and creative work that have shaped the Western world, from Leonardo DaVinci and Michelangelo Buonorotti, to Pablo Picasso and August Rodin, from Giovanni Palestrina to Benjamin Britten, from Michelozzo di Bartolommeo to Frank Lloyd Wright, from Molière and Jean Baptiste Racine to Oscar Wilde and Tom Stoppard. We will examine and discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, music, dance, theatre, photography, and film, within their literary and cultural contexts. In addition to group readings, viewings, listenings, and discussion, students will make both oral and written presentations on selections throughout the semester.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 4300-H01    Individual Honors Research     Contact: Honors Associate Dean     (806) 742-1828

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis/project application on file.
Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Associate Dean.

FULL

HONS 4301-H01 SEMINAR Constitutional Law

(CRN# 43158)     Prof. R. Rosen     MTWR 8:00-8:50 AM

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5410. Constitutional Law Application to take this course is required. Applications are due Friday, October 25th to sarah.timmons@ttu.edu in the Honors College. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students. Students subsequently admitted to the TTU School of Law may have this course waived from their law school degree plan provided that a C+ or higher is earned in the class. Class commences one week earlier than TTU undergraduate classes.
A study of the federal judiciary’s doctrine and practice of judicial review; judicial power and the jurisdiction of the federal courts; the powers of Congress, including its power to regulate commerce; the power of the states to regulate commerce; the separation of powers; and the protection of private rights, privileges, and immunities under the Constitution, including the rights of due process, equal protection, freedom of expression, and freedom of religion.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

CANCELLED

HONS 4301-H02 SEMINAR The Rule of Law as the Foundation For our Democracy and our Nation’s Security

(CRN# 45959)     Prof. W. Huffman     TR 3:30-4:50 PM

America’s founders were well aware of the abuses that can flow from the Rule of Man – in our case the “man” being the King of England.  As American Patriot Thomas Paine wrote in his influential Federalist Papers, America would be different: “in England, the King is the Law, in America the Law will be King.”  The basic concept that the law would be King in America was, in turn, the driving force behind many provisions of our Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Equal protection, due process, justice, and liberty itself all connote a process where all persons receive the protections of the law, and no person is above the law.  And that is one definition of the Rule of Law.  This course will examine the precepts of the Rule of Law as established in the Constitution, Laws, and Treaties of the United States in two related contexts: American leaders, especially lawyer-leaders, who have embodied the letter and the spirit of the Rule of Law in their leadership, and the role the Rule of Law plays in the critical decisions that have marked America’s history and will continue to define its future – especially focusing on our National Security.  The course materials will be augmented by student presentations concerning past National Security Law decisions, e.g., Does killing an American citizen by drone strike comport with our Constitution and the Rule of Law?; and possible future decisions, e.g, What domestic and international legal authority must the President have to intervene in Syria?  What is the proper balance between the First Amendment and National Security regarding the Wikileaks trials?  This course will be taught in seminar format and is limited to 18 students.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 4301-H03 SEMINAR Property Law

(CRN# 50409)     Prof. G. Beyer     MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5310. Property Law Application to take this course is required. Applications are due Friday, October 25th to Sarah.Timmons@ttu.edu  in the Honors College. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students. Students subsequently admitted to the TTU School of Law may have this course waived from their law school degree plan provided that a C+ or higher is earned in the class. Class commences one week earlier than TTU undergraduate classes.
An introduction to the law of personal property and real property, including estates and other interests in land, real property marketing and conveyancing, and landlord and tenant problems.  Students receiving a grade of C+ or better in the course who later matriculate at the Texas Tech University School of Law may not be required to repeat the course if approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs when another course or courses are available in the same subject area which may be taken in substitution for equivalent credit hours which will then be a part of such student’s required first-year curriculum. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 4301-H04 SEMINAR Criminal Law

(CRN# 47663)     Prof. B. Shannon     MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5310. Criminal Law Application to take this course is required. Applications are due Friday, October 25th to Sarah.Timmons@ttu.edu  in the Honors College. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students. Students subsequently admitted to the TTU School of Law may have this course waived from their law school degree plan provided that a C+ or higher is earned in the class. Class commences one week earlier than TTU undergraduate classes.
Inquiry into the sources and goals of the criminal law, limitations on the state’s power to define criminal liability, general principles of liability and defenses, and the characteristics of particular crimes.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HUM 2302-H01 SEMINAR The Western Tradition II: Renaissance to 21st Century

(CRN# 26165)     Prof. J. Brink                  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: This course is required for all HAL majors. Non-Honors students who wish to take this course must obtain permission from Dr. Brink (jim.brink@ttu.edu) before receiving a permit.
Why is a given literary, philosophical or artistic work considered “novel,” “innovative” or “revolutionary”? How is it that the new appears against a certain intellectual background? To what extent is novelty some “objective” characteristic, intrinsic to the work itself and to what extent is it the result of its interaction with the intellectual/artistic environment within which it emerges? What roles do extraneous factors (such as competition and demands of the market, political pressure/sponsorship, ideological and religious censorship) play in the genesis of novelty? What are the major patterns of intellectual and artistic change in the Western modern world? These are some of the questions that we will be addressing in the class. This interdisciplinary course proposes a close look at some of the intense “knots” of novelty in philosophy, literature, and the arts from Renaissance to our times, with the aim of bringing about a better understanding of how cultural history works and how the new is being produced.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

ISQS 2340-H01 Introduction to Information Systems in Business

(CRN# 50180) Prof. M. Wetherbe   MW 2:00-3:20pm

This course is designed to introduce students to information systems and examine how these powerful systems have fundamentally reshaped modern organizations along with our society.  This course focuses on the key components of information systems – people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage.  To address this, an innovative applied learning approach is used in this class. The assignments are Collaborative Action Learning Exercises that simulate real world application of knowledge.  Preparation for these activities is class lecture/discussion along with homework.  Classroom performance in the action learning exercises is used for evidence of learning. Assessment of learning includes peer review  evaluations.  In addition, students prepare and present a Management Report scheduled as their final exam for the semester.

 

MATH 1451-H01   Calculus I with Applications     (CRN# 49573)  Prof. A. Ibraguimov            T 11:00-11:50 AM
MATH 1451-H01   Non-Credit Applications Lab                             Prof. A. Ibraguimov            TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or score of 3 on the AP AB Calculus exam and a score of 5 on the MPE; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with B- or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with B- or better.
Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MATH 1452-H01   Calculus II with Applications     (CRN# 45955)     Prof. G. Williams           MW 1:00-2:50 PM

MATH 1452-H01   Non-Credit Applications Lab

Prerequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better.
Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, applications.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 1452-H02   Calculus II with Applications     (CRN# 46038)     Prof. L. Roeger              M 9:00-9:50 AM

MATH 1452-H02   Non-Credit Applications Lab                                 Prof. L. Roeger              MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1451 with a grade of B- or better.
Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, applications.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MATH 2360-H01   Linear Algebra                        (CRN# 26219)                 Prof. E. Allen     MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1352 with a grade of B- or better.
This course will involve a balance of theory, application and computation.  The many uses of linear algebra will be emphasized in conjunction with the philosophy that serious applications of linear algebra require some computing capability.  To this end the course will involve significant use of MATLAB.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2450-H01   Calculus III with Applications          (CRN# 45951)             Prof.  L. Juan        T 2:00-2:50 PM
MATH 2450-H01   Non-Credit Applications Lab                                               Prof.  L. Juan        TR 12:30-1:50 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1452 with a grade of B- or better.
Partial differentiation; functions of several variables; multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes Theorem.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 3342-H01   Mathematical Statistics for Engineers and Scientists

(CRN# 47451)     Prof. J. Surles                 MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 2450. MATH 3342 and 4342 cannot both be counted toward a mathematics major or minor.
This course is designed to cover topics from mathematical statistics that are of interest to students from engineering and/or the sciences. Topics will include descriptive statistics, elementary probability, random variables and their distributions, mean, variance, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of variance.  In addition, students will get hands-on experience in the process of experimentation, data collection, and analysis via a group project where students will propose an experiment, get approval, design the experiment and data collection methodology/protocols, run/conduct the experiment and gather data, then analyze the data and draw conclusions.  This will all be presented in a written report as well as an oral presentation before their peers.

FULL

MATH 3350-H01   Higher Math for Engineers And Scientists     

(CRN# 26226)                 Prof. L. Allen                  TR 12:30-1:50 PM                         

Note: This course is open to Math minors, but does not provide credit toward a Math major.
Prerequisite: MATH 2450 with a grade of B- or better.
Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and other selected topics.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 4000-H01 SEMINAR History of Mathematics

(CRN# 37054)                 Prof. C. Seaquist             TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Note: MATH 4000 may substitute for anything above MATH 2360 for Math minor per department.
Prerequisites: MATH 1451 or consent of instructor.
This course will present an overview of the history of Western mathematics from the Ancient Greece to the modern era. More specifically it will cover the development of three main subjects: arithmetic, geometry, and calculus. In examining arithmetic we will discuss the development of number systems, algorithms and devices for performing calculation, and the main applications that have promoted its growth including business, science, and number theory. In examining the development of geometry we will see how classical synthetic geometry led to the axiomatic method that replaced an ad hoc approach and how this development in turn led to a crisis in geometry that is still to be
resolved. Finally we will focus on how various ideas about measurement, which grew out of classical geometry, were eventually brought into harmony with the idea of number by Descartes, Dedekind, and others. Furthermore, we will study the ideas behind the development of the calculus by Eudoxus, Archimedes, Descartes, and Fermat. We will then show how these ideas came together under Newton and Leibnitz. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

ME 2301- H01         Statics                      (CRN# 50504)                      Prof. J. Hanson                          MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisites: MATH 1452 and PHYS 1408.
The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (statics, solid mechanics, and dynamics).  Statics is the introductory course for the mechanical sciences.  Course topics include the fundamental principles and analysis procedures for particles, rigid bodies, and systems of rigid bodies in static equilibrium and an introduction to solid mechanics or the determination of stresses and deformations in bodies in static equilibrium. Honors Engineering Mechanics I also includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis.  Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics.

 

ME 2322- H01         Engineering Thermodynamics I        (CRN# 45657)         Prof. E. Anderson      TR 11:00-12:20 AM

Prerequisites: MATH 1452, PHYS 1408
The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (solid mechanics, statistics, and dynamics). Engineering Thermodynamics is the introductory course for the thermal sciences. Course topics include properties of pure substances, ideal gas behavior, first and second law analysis, and applications to energy conversion devices and thermodynamic cycles. Honors Thermodynamics I includes a supplementary thermodynamic system design project and extensive use of computer-aided parametric explorations of thermodynamic systems.
Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics.

 

MGT 4380-HS1      Strategic Management                 (CRN# 50393)                 Prof. C. Duran     W 2:00-4:50 PM

Prerequisites: Business students only who have completed BLAW 3391, ISQS 3344, FIN 3320, MKT 3350, MGT 3370, and MGT 3373 with grades of C or higher and are in their final semester.  No COBA classifications permitted.
Strategic Management is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business administration students. This is an exciting, challenging course that focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students use all the knowledge and concepts acquired from prior business courses, integrate them with new strategic-management techniques, and use them to chart the future direction of different organizations. The major responsibility of students in this course is to make objective strategic decisions and to justify them through oral presentations and written case studies. This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily discussion-based, but also has written components. Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course. This honors course periodically contains a service learning experience and case. Service learning is an active learning technique that combines application of course concepts, interaction with a community partner, and reflective components. The students will have the chance to apply the strategic management concepts learned in this course in a real world setting.

FULL

MKT 3350-H01          Introduction to Marketing     (CRN# 26239)          Prof. J. Wilcox                         MW 1:00-2:20 PM

Prerequisite: ECO 2301 or AAEC 2305 or ECO 2305
The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the discipline of marketing, both as a philosophy of business and as a series of business practices. The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization’s resources to satisfy customers’ wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. Specifically, we will examine how marketers: understand consumers’ needs and wants; develop products and services that provide superior value; and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally. The course will direct your study of the organization (either a profit-oriented firm or a non-profit organization) as a market entity existing in a competitive environment. The emphasis will be on understanding the importance of quality, value, and customer relationship management in obtaining a competitive advantage in today’s marketplace. In addition, we will consider the ethical and societal issues related to marketing. The course will emphasize service learning where you will work with a real client organization to solve marketing problems through research and analysis.

FULL

PHYS 1408-H01     Principles of Physics I            (CRN# 45874)                Prof. W. Glab     TR 12:30-1:50 PM
PHYS 1408-H51     Principles of Physics I Lab    (CRN# 45875)                Staff                    M 11:00 AM-12:50 PM
PHYS 1408-751     Principles of Physics I Recitation  (CRN# 46008)      Staff                    M 3:00-3:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.
Prerequisite:  MATH 1451
Corequisite:  PHYS 1408-H51 Lab and PHYS 1408-751 Recitation.
Calculus-based introductory physics course. Mechanics, kinematics, energy, momentum, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

PHYS 2401-H01     Principles of Physics II                 (CRN# 33817)                 TBA                 TR 12:30-1:50 PM
PHYS 2401-H51     Principles of Physics II Lab         (CRN# 41373)                 Staff                 W 2:00-3:50 PM
PHYS 2401-751     Principles of Physics II Recitation  (CRN# 46006)            Staff                  R 2:00-2:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.
Prerequisites: PHYS 1408 and MATH 1452
Corequisite: PHYS 2401-H51 and PHYS 2401-751 Recitation.
Calculus-based introductory physics. Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and optics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

POLS 2302-H01     American Public Policy                 (CRN# 26258)    Prof. T. Meredith     MWF 11:00-11:50AM

Note:  You need not take POLS 1301 and 2302 in any particular order.
We are currently in an age of radical change. Public policies, from health care to education policy, punishment to corporate regulation – are under a new scrutiny in the contemporary climate of economic crisis, and for many citizens, existential crisis – crises that are about the very means by which Americans will live. In this course we will examine particular public policies, their impact on the masses of Americans, and on specific subpopulations (such as Latinos and African Americans) to better understand the significance of this transformative period in public policy that the nation is now undergoing. The major assignments for this course are weekly writing assignments, an in-class presentation of a research topic of your choosing that is relevant to the course material, and a final essay exam.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM POLITICAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

POLS 3361-H01 SEMINAR Introduction to International Relations

(CRN# 45991)                Prof. M. Rybalko           MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

This course offers an introduction to the study of international relations.  The course will focus on the causes of conflict and cooperation between nations, sources of terrorism, counter-terrorism strategies, and current issues related to international security.  Specific issues the class will address include:  why do nations go to war; under what conditions are nations most likely to resort to conflict or diplomacy; what are the factors that give rise to terrorism; how can terrorist activity be prevented; and what are the current and future issues influencing international security (e.g., population trends, globalization, food security and natural resources).  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

PSY 4000-H01 SEMINAR Narratives of Mental Disorders

(CRN# 36958)                 Prof. J. Clopton              M 2:00-4:50 PM

Note: Students must register for 3 hours of variable credit using hyperlink. No adds after first day of class.
Many individuals with mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, have written diaries and autobiographies. Even though these narratives are often ignored by mental health professionals and by educators, they are so interesting to the general public that some of them have become bestsellers. In this course, we will read and discuss a small sample of books written by individuals with mental disorders. We will be reading about 100 to 200 pages each week. Class participation and in-class writing assignments will be the basis for course grades.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

SOC 1301-H01        Introduction to Sociology     (CRN# 47019)               Prof. J. Dunn     MWF 12:00-12:50 PM

Society and the social groups to which we belong influence a great deal of our lives – how we feel, how we act, and what we believe.  This course uses the sociological perspective to uncover hidden social forces, social institutions, and social problems.  It is my aim that you will leave this course with an appreciation for and the ability to identify those social forces in the media and in your daily life.  Specifically, we will focus on the link between societal and individual circumstances, and how individuals are affected and constrained by their environments.  You should expect to speak up in class and have a respectful dialogue with your classmates and I.  This class helps to fulfill the requirement of “Social and Behavioral Sciences” in the core curriculum. The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase the student’s knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas.  Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS THREE HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR REQUIRMENT.

 

SPAN 2302-H01     Second Course in Spanish II     (CRN# 45511)                 Prof. J. McNutt     TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: SPAN 2301
This course emphasizes listening, reading, written and oral skills in order to develop students' communicative competence. In addition, this course will place significant stress on the development of students' intercultural competence through reading texts and written assignments.  The development of all these crucial skills are integrated in a highly interactive and fun environment in which students practice and improve their Spanish every day.

FULL

THA 2301-H01       Introduction to Acting          (CRN# 50182)                 Prof. W. Gelber     MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

All people are performers. Everyday we “present” a different side of ourselves to the various persons with whom we come in contact.  We are all skilled at a kind of “deception” which allows us to transform our voices and our bodies as needed to get what we want. As children, we learn what works and what doesn’t work in our interactions with adults. These become ingrained in us.  In this course, we remind ourselves what our different sides consist of, we learn strategies for acquiring our needs, we learn to relate to each other, to sympathize and even empathize with people different from ourselves.  We become better citizens in a global society. In the study of acting we learn to be better sociologists, psychologists, public speakers, athletes, managers, anthropologists, parents, children, friends.  In short, we learn much more about the human condition in order to reflect it to others. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS REQUIREMENTS.

 

SPRING 2014 HONORS SEMINARS

ANSC 4001-H01   Ethics in Research  W 6:00-8:50 PM

ENGL 3382-H01   Women Writers:  Pain & Hysteria in Gothic Literature (Humanities Credit)  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

EVHM 3306-H01   Current Readings in Natural History  TR 2:00-3:20 PM

EVHM 3350-H01   Advanced Fieldcraft  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

HIST 3337-H01     Science in American Society  T 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 1304-H01   The Superhero in Film, Television, and Popular Culture (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  M 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 1304-H02   Analyzing Popular Music: Theory and Practice TR 12:30-1:50PM

HONS 2314-H01   Latin American Cinema (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  W 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 2314-H02   Europe and Its Cinema T 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 3301-H01   Shakespeare’s Violent Men (Humanities Credit)  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

HONS 3301-H02   Philosophical Issues and Problems in Human Caring (Humanities Credit)  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

HONS 3301-H03   Philosophical Filmmakers: Bergman, Kurosawa, Kieslowski (Humanities Credit)  W 6:00-8:50 PM

HONS 3301-H04   U.S. Women’s History:  Founding Mothers, Freedom Fighters, and Fish Without Bicycles  TR 12:30-1:50 PM

HONS 3301-H05   Booms, Busts, and Dust: Writings About Texans and Their Land (Humanities Credit)  TR 12:30-1:50 PM

HONS 3301-H06   Heroic Lives MW 3:00-4:20 PM

HONS 3302-H02   Early Clinical Experience MW 1:00-1:50 PM, W 2:00-4:50PM

HONS 3304-H01   Bones, Botanicals, Birds (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  T 2:00-4:50 PM

HONS 3304-H03   The American Musical As Social Document (Visual & Performing Arts Credit) TR 9:30-10:50AM

HONS 3304-H04   Intersections of Film and Dance (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  MW 9:30-10:50 AM

HONS 3305-H01   Seminar in European Fine Arts (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

HONS 4301-H01   Constitutional Law  MTWR 8:00-8:50 AM

HONS 4301-H02   The Rule of Law as the Foundation for our Democracy and our Nation’s Security  TR 3:30-4:50 PM

HONS 4301-H03   Property Law MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

HONS 4301-H04   Criminal Law  MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

HUM 2302-H01     Western Intellectual Tradition II  (Humanities Credit)  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

MATH 4000-H01   History of Math  TR 9:30-10:50 AM

POLS 3361-H01   Introduction to International Relations  MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

PSY 4000-H01     Narratives of Mental Disorders  M 2:00-4:50 PM