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Summer 2011 & Fall 2011 Course Offerings

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Advising Information

Fall 2011 First-Year Experience Courses

Quick Links:         Substitutions Summer Intersession 2011 Courses                                   Summer II 2011 Courses | Fall 2011 Courses |  Fall 2011 Seminars

Substitution Opportunities for Upper-Level Honors Credit

(Six hours only of substitutions permitted per student)

STUDY ABROAD WAIVER

The Honors College believes strongly in the formative power of studying abroad.  Therefore, the Honors College offers a waiver of 3 hours of upper-level Honors course credits through the successful completion of a Study Abroad Waiver in conjunction with a study abroad program.  Through this process, students may earn a waiver for up to 3 hours of Honors non-seminar credit for a summer session, fall or spring semester abroad. Students who study for two semesters abroad (full summer, fall or spring) may earn a waiver for up to 6 hours of Honors non-seminar credit. Honors seminars may not be waived.  Studying abroad is a type of experiential learning which is most meaningful when accompanied by organized reflection.  The purpose of the Study Abroad Waiver is to provide opportunity for this reflection.  There are two components to the Study Abroad Waiver: an online journal and an academic reflective essay connecting student experiences abroad to a prescribed book read before leaving.  Students are not allowed to complete a Study Abroad Waiver to earn Honors credit during their final semester before graduation.  Contact Thomas Reynolds at 742-1828 for more information.

HONORS COURSE CONTRACT

Honors Contracting allows an Honors student to receive Honors credit for a non-Honors course by completing work above and beyond what is required of students in the course.  Only 3000 and 4000-level courses that meet face-to-face are eligible to be contracted. Graduate courses and cross-listed courses may also be taken for Honors credit. Contracting is not permitted during a student’s final semester before graduation.  See Donna Srader at the Honors College (742-1828) for more information and for an application to contract a course.

SUMMER INTERSESSION 2011 COURSES

 

EVHM 4350-H01       EVHM Capstone Experience:             (CRN #33443)         Prof. K. Caswell                          TBA

                               Leadership and Landscape                 SEMINAR

Note: There is a special course fee of $550; the Honors College will subsidize $500 of this fee, and students will pay only tuition and $50.

Note: Formerly known as NHH 4350-H01.

Course dates: May 11-26, 2011 (Intersession)

Prerequisite: Instructor approval is required; email Professor Caswell at Kurt.Caswell@ttu.edu.

The outdoors is our classroom in this field experience course. Students will spend two weeks traveling in canoes on a western river, while honing skills in leadership and group dynamics, creative writing, critical reading, and primitive camping. Students will take on leadership roles, and be offered peer feedback on judgment and decision making. In addition, we’ll attend to experiences in solitude and in community in nature, and make a point of exploring the flora, fauna, geology, weathers, archaeology, and history of the river canyon.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF HONORS SEMINAR CREDIT FOR NON-EVHM MAJORS AND MINORS.

SUMMER II 2011 COURSES

 

COMS 2300-H01    Public Speaking             (CRN #30288)                Prof. M. Gibson             MTWRF 12:00-1:50 PM

Jerry Seinfeld once stated that “According to most studies, people's number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. Death  is number two. Does that sound right? This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you're better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.” Come learn how to master the art of public speaking! Communication is more than just getting a message from point A to point B; true communication happens on a deeper level to create more positive results.  Join us as we discover ways to communicate more effectively personally and professionally. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENT.

 

HONS 2314-H01      Latin American Cinema          (CRN #30394)         Prof. G. Elbow            MTWRF 8:00-9:50 AM

SEMINAR

Note: Students are only allowed to take one  lower-level seminar to cover one of their two required seminars.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

What can we learn about a place from its movies?  Find out the answer to this question, learn how to watch and evaluate films, and practice your Spanish and/or Portuguese comprehension, all while watching some of the best movies Latin America has produced.  Films that will be viewed are from many different Latin American countries, but especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico, which are the region’s most important film producers.  Films are in Spanish or Portuguese with English subtitles.  Don't expect many happy endings, but you will get an insight into the history, culture, and politics of some of Latin America's most important countries. Instead of exams, grading is based on short essays (about 1000 words) that evaluate the aesthetic elements (use of cinematography, costume, setting, musical score, dialogue, color, etc) of the films and comments on social, political, and cultural context as appropriate.  Since class meets every day, we will watch pairs of films that are related by theme, director, or another element. You will write your essay on the film pairs (i.e., after every two films). This will require you to prepare two essays per week (7 essays for the session).  A concluding assignment asks students to summarize their impressions of Latin American cinema, as represented in films shown during the semester, and to compare Latin American and U.S. cinema. Warning: Latin Americans have different attitudes than North Americans when it comes to what is shown on film. Some of the films that will be shown in class contain nudity, explicit sex and prostitution, violence, and homosexuality.  Knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese is helpful but not necessary to enjoy this course and receive a good grade.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS, MULTICULTURAL, AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3301-H01    Joan of Arc: The Most Famous      (CRN #30473)         Prof. J. Brink       MTWRF 10:00-11:50 AM

                              Teenager in History                               SEMINAR

Arguably the most famous teenager in history, Joan of Arc has been embraced as a symbol for France, for feminism, for the right, for the left, in fact for nearly the whole spectrum of human identification.  That she lived, that she played a very important role in relieving France of an “invading” army (the English and their Burgundian allies), that she was captured, tortured, tried and executed, all are without doubt.  Just how she has become a symbol for such a variety of “causes”, even the inspiration for a television series of a modern girl, is more problematic. And that’s what we’re going to investigate, almost like a “cold case” approach to the facts and myths of her life, trial, and death.   We possess the trial transcript, drawn up by the prosecution.  In other words, the responses to the prosecution’s questions (there was no defense!) ascribed to this nineteen year old illiterate peasant girl were preserved by those most intent on seeing her discredited and found guilty of a vast array of charges , principal among which was witchcraft.  We will look at the facts, the facts, but not nothing but the facts in a seminar built on individual reports by the class.  Where does truth lie and where does myth begin?  This is rich material, from the transcript to histories, to plays and films and art.  The fascinating life and larger than life impact of this teenager will be a microcosm for how history “treats” figures for purposes that spontaneously present themselves. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FALL 2011 COURSES

 

ACCT 2300-H01    Introduction to Accounting            (CRN #20419)         Prof. A. Collins      MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, Sophomore standing, and a C or better in any college-level mathematics course.

This course is the first course in the accounting sequence, and introduces students to all aspects of external financial reporting.  Content includes a basic introduction to the preparation of financial statements and the study of annual reports. Course includes discussion of current topics in financial reporting and research on financial statements of companies listed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

ANSC 3401-H01     Reproductive Physiology            (CRN #10532)          Prof. S. Prien           MW 6:00-7:20 PM

ANSC 3401-H50     Non-Credit Lab                              (CRN #10541)          Prof. S. Prien               W 1:00-2:20 PM

ANSC 3401-H70     Discussion                                        (CRN #10548)          Prof. S. Prien               R 5:00-5:50 PM

Prerequisite: ANSC 2202 and 2306 or ANSC 3405.

Corequisite: ANSC 3401-H50 Lab and ANSC 3401-H70 Discussion

This course will provide students with an opportunity for an in-depth study of the reproductive process as it occurs in farm animals. This course differs from the regular section and will target highly motivated students with a unique integrated intellectual experience. As such, the fundamental aspects of reproductive physiology and management will be presented using a more interactive and personalized approach. Topics covered in the course include male and female reproductive anatomy, endocrine glands, sex determination, cloning, artificial insemination, and embryo transfer.

CANCELLED

ARCH 4311-H01     Architecture in Non-Western Societies       (CRN #21570)       Prof. J. Aranha     R 6:00-8:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: This course is cross-listed with ARCH 4311-001, in which eligible non-Honors students may enroll without permission from the Honors College.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Arch 4311 in fall 2011 focuses on architecture and the built environment in India.  Students will be introduced to how architecture can give formal expression to complex ideas such as universal order, religious beliefs, cultural values and social organization by studying Indian architecture. The course introduces students to the factors and forces that shaped and continue to shape the built environment in India. Via lectures, readings and discussion the course provides students with an introductory understanding of ideas, meanings and symbolisms that are expressed in Indian architecture, introduces them to the multicultural, multi-ethnic and multi religious diversity of India past and present and prepares them for a mandatory study tour to India (during winter break) at the end of the course. Topics of readings and discussions will focus on Hindu, Islamic, Colonial, Modern and Contemporary architecture. Only Junior or Senior classifications will be permitted. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MULTICULTURAL AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

ASTR 1400-H01     Solar System Astronomy          (CRN #26601)       Prof. M. Clark            MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

ASTR 1400-H51     Non-Credit Lab                            (CRN #26602)                 Staff                       W 4:00-5:50 PM

ASTR 1400-751      Discussion                                   (CRN #26603)                 Staff                           TBA

Solar System exploration is in the middle of exciting times.  There are more robotic explorers scouring the solar system now than ever before.  Join in this exploration while taking your natural science course.  Learn all about our nearest neighbors, and what makes the Earth unique in the solar system.  Study the latest missions and find out how to see the latest images even before the scientists do!  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.   

FULL

ATMO 1300-H01     Intro. to Atmospheric Science    (CRN #24738)       Prof. D. Haragan    MW 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Note: Due to some duplication of content, students who have taken Honors Integrated Science with an Atmospheric Science component are not eligible for this class.

Corequisite:  Any section of ATMO 1100 Lab

A descriptive treatment of the science of the atmosphere in its modern dress.  Since all activity in the atmosphere is a response to solar energy, the course will begin with an introduction to radiation, atmospheric composition and the resulting heat balance of the earth-atmosphere system. This will be followed by consideration of the forces that control the state of the atmosphere and atmospheric motion.  Finally, the focus will shift to a discussion of contemporary issues related to atmospheric science such as global warming, environmental pollution, climate change, severe storms and weather modification. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

BIOL 1403-H01     Biology I                                (CRN #13607)                 Prof. M. Dini                  MW 2:00-3:20 PM

BIOL 1403-H51     Non-Credit Lab                   (CRN #13614)                 Staff                               R 2:00-4:50 PM 

                                                                                                                                                  Exams T 6:00-7:30 PM   

Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: 1) One year of HS Biology; AND 2) Freshmen must meet one of the following criteria: SAT of 1100, ACT of 27, or AP Biology score of 3. Instructor strongly recommends taking CHEM 1307 first.

Corequisite: BIOL 1403-H51 Lab section.

Honors Biology I is designed especially with the sophomore life sciences major in mind.  This course helps students build a strong foundation in cell biology, biochemistry, genetics (both molecular and classical), reproductive and developmental biology and evolutionary biology.  Along with helping students construct a knowledge base in biology, the course will also challenge students to think about problems as biologists think about them.  Rather than listening to lectures, students in this course will do their basic research/reading outside of class, whereas class time will be used to refine and clarify understanding, often in the context of small groups.  Students in this course are expected to take a very active and responsible role in their education as biologists.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

CHEM 1307-H01   Principles of Chemistry I           (CRN #14787)             Prof. D. Casadonte     TR 9:30-10:50 AM

CHEM 1307-701    Required Review Session          (CRN #24719)             Prof. D. Casadonte     M 5:00-6:30 PM

CHEM 1307-702    Required Review Session          (CRN #24730)             Prof. D. Casadonte     T 5:00-6:30 PM

Note: Exams will be held on Wednesday evenings from 7:00-9:00pm. Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: At least one year of HS Chemistry, a grade of A in CHEM 1301 OR a passing score on the Chemistry Placement Exam AND a score of 600/26 or better on the Math portion of the SAT/ACT.  This course is open only to Honors students.

Corequisite: any CHEM 1107 Lab section.

This course focuses on a study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry including nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, molecular structure and geometry, bonding concepts and paradigms, thermochemistry, states of matter, the physical characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases, phase transitions, and an introduction to solution properties. This course has a limited enrollment, and as such provides opportunities for direct faculty-student interaction, small group discussion, and hands-on and inquiry-based learning. This course is recommended for students who plan careers in chemistry or in the physical and biological sciences, as well as in medicine or engineering.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

CHEM 3305-H01   Organic Chemistry I            (CRN #14791)            Prof. M. Fuertes         MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                                                                                                                                    Exams R 7:00-9:00 PM

Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to Honors students.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, CHEM 1107, CHEM 1308 and CHEM 1108 with a grade of B- or better.

Corequisite: CHEM 3105 strongly recommended.

Organic chemistry, the chemistry of carbon compounds, underlies almost all the stuff of modern life, including combustion, biochemistry, food, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. The first semester course begins with the language of organic chemistry, the symbols and concepts that we use to describe, understand and predict the structure and bonding of organic molecules. We then discuss some of the fundamental reactions of organic molecules. The emphasis is on understanding simple reactions so they can be applied to more complex systems. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

FULL

COMS 3358-H01    Business and Professional           (CRN #27811)          Prof. D. Roach        TR 8:00-9:20 AM

                                    Communication

This course is designed to introduce you to basic skills, principles, and contexts of communication in business and professional settings. Verbal and nonverbal elements of oral communication are emphasized. Practice is provided in skills and principles associated with presentations, interviews, and meetings. The course fulfills the Oral Communication component of the University's General Education requirements. The course is based on research evidence and business trends indicating that in addition to fundamental effectiveness in communication skills, quality presentation-making is one of the most prevalent and important job tasks in careers today. In light of this, presentation assignments in the course stress basic skills of idea generation, message development, and message delivery.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM ORAL COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENT. 

 

ENGL 2307-H01    Introduction to Fiction: The Great    (CRN #14820)      Prof. J. Shelton    TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                                    War in Fiction

Note: Bachelor of Science students may fulfill both core curriculum Humanities credit and Sophomore Literature credit with this course.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302

This course will examine the Great War (1914-1918) in fictional representation, including fictionalized memoirs.  The first war to be fought with modern weapons, but one in which 19th century tactics were used, the Great War continues to live in European imagination as the determinative event of the 20th century.  By looking at fictional texts about this historical event, we will consider how writers have used and altered conventions of fiction in order to enable their representations of the war.  In order to contextualize fictional practices, we will read a bit of war poetry, some historical documents, critical essays, and quasi-fictional texts.  The preliminary reading list includes All Quiet on the Western Front, Regeneration, Mrs. Dalloway, and Undertones of War.

 

EVHM 2302-H01    The Literature of Place           (CRN #28345)                 Prof. S. Tomlinson         T 2:00-4:50 PM

                            (Formerly Landscapes)                   SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

Note: Formerly NHH 2302-H01.

What is a landscape? How do landscapes shape us, and how do we shape them? This course explores these questions by looking at the many different landscapes around us (neighborhoods, gardens, coffeehouses, food, cemeteries…) and their meanings through reading, discussion, writing, and art. Students will also study and think about landscapes through painting and drawing, and create landscape journals using book- and journal-making techniques. Students do not need artistic “talent” to benefit from this course, only a willingness to explore and work hard. Required field trips around Lubbock. Students must have access to a bicycle. Though there is some drawing and painting in this class, this course is reading, writing, and discussion intensive. Field trips! Bicycles! Local food! How could you go wrong? THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

EVHM 3300-H01       Writing for Publication       (CRN #28346)     Prof. K. Caswell             TR 12:30-1:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Formerly known as NHH 3300-H01.

A writing workshop in creative nonfiction focused on the relationship between people and nature. Students will practice a variety of structural and stylistic approaches with an eye toward developing their personal voice. Research – scientific, philosophical, cultural, theological – will be a major part of the writing process. Students will also learn how to submit their writing for publication. A final student reading will be open to the public.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

EVHM 3305-H01       Ecology                          (CRN# 28347)                 Prof. M. McGinley         MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: This course provides 3 hours of Biology elective credit for Biology majors, but will not substitute for credit toward the Biology core courses.  This course is different than BIOL 3309.

Note: Formerly known as NHH 3305-H01.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the field of ecology for students in EVHM.  This course will examine ecology of individuals, populations, and communities and introduce you to the techniques that ecologists use to develop hypotheses (including mathematical modeling) and test their hypotheses in the lab and the field. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HIST 2300-H01      History of the U.S. to 1877        (CRN# 14852)            Prof. B. Hahn              TR 12:30-1:50 PM

This course lets you answer for yourself some of the thorniest questions in American history: how did this disparate set of British colonies become one nation? Why did the national structure break apart into Civil War less than a century later? Readings, writing assignments, and discussions all provide access to the methods historians use to answer such questions and investigate the human condition. Primary source readings will inform your analysis of debates concerning historical events and processes, while the textbook and secondary sources provide both the necessary narrative spine and many alternative explanations that historians have considered for these claims. This hands-on examination of historical issues requires your active engagement and participation, so come prepared to think! THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM U.S. HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HIST 3361-H01      British History                     (CRN# 18827)                 Prof. G. Bell                    TR 9:30-10:50 AM

SEMINAR

Note: A small number of spaces in the course are reserved for non-Honors History majors.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Few periods and few nations in the totality of human history are quite so important as Great Britain in the modern era.  This small island nation, during this time, came to dominate much of the known world, and she left a lasting impression on the majority of the peoples of the world.  Besides establishing a vast empire, and seeing coming into existence out of that empire many of the modern countries that we recognize (the United State, Canada, South Africa, India, etc.), Britain also led the way in resisting the fascists dictatorships in World War II, in peaceably adopting socialistic reforms, as well as other social, economic, and political marks of modernity, and managed, as well, to leave a lasting legacy of laws, language and social mores that define much of modernity.  It is a subject well worth studying.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

HONS 1302-H02    Seminar in Healthcare            (CRN #20086)                 Profs. R. Rolfe               T 6:00-8:50 PM

                                                                                       SEMINAR                     & C. Myers

Note: Preference will be given to Honors freshmen and sophomores. Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

The Honors College Seminar in Healthcare introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of healthcare professionals in the disciplines of medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, pharmacy, and research.  Healthcare professionals will provide personal and professional insight into the roles and responsibilities of the different disciplines, current healthcare issues, technologies, ethics, and the requirements and expectations of students applying for admission into healthcare fields of study.  Students will have the unique opportunity to meet faculty and professionals in practice.  Highlights of the class will include tours of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center’s (TTUHSC) gross anatomy lab, the TTUHSC diagnostic laboratories, the Garrison Center, the SimLife Center and the Student Synergistic Center, as well as attendance at the TTUHSC Community Medical School.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE REQUIREMENT AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 2311-H01            The Middle East                  (CRN #24736)            Prof. M. Maqusi        MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

                                  In a Globalizing World                     SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

This course is aimed at offering an introductory study of contemporary Middle East issues, with particular reference to and emphasis on issues of cultural (including brief comparative readings of the three monotheistic religions), economic and socio-political reforms as well as contemporary developments of Middle Eastern international relations.

THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES, MULTICULTURAL AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

CANCELLED

HONS 2311-H02      Social Justice, Constitutionalism,    (CRN #28752)     Prof. I. Leslie       TR 8:00-9:20 AM

                                   and Public Rhetoric

Historically, emerging democracies have looked to the United States for a model of constitutional democracy. However, contemporary American politics are defined by contentious debates about constitutional interpretations of a number of important public issues, including, for example: states' rights; globalization and the contemporary American economic crisis; the regulation of corporate power; state and federal education policy; church and state separation; immigration policy; national security; prison privatization and militarization; the death penalty; police brutality; and anti-Arab, anti-black, and anti-Latino sentiment, and the political tensions that increasing racial polarization creates between constitutional ideals of equal protection and free speech. In this course, we will critically examine competing interpretations of the US Constitution and definitions of social justice. We will define background assumptions that competing political moralities entail. We will also ask which perspectives, if any, elite political actors tend to marginalize in contemporary public deliberation. The major assignments for this course are regular quizzes, a research essay, and an in-class presentation. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT, HUMANITIES CREDIT AND MULTICULTURAL CREDIT.

FULL

HONS 2314-H01    Europe and Its Cinema           (CRN #24737)             Prof. C. Bradatan           T 6:00-8:50 PM

SEMINAR

Note: Students may take only one lower-level seminar to fulfill Honors seminar requirements.  The second seminar must be a 3000 or 4000 level course.

This interdisciplinary seminar proposes an introduction to the study of the European culture through the masterpieces of its cinema. We will look at some of the most significant social, political, cultural and intellectual developments in 20th and 21st century Europe as seen through works by major European directors: Serguei Eisenstein, Jean Renoir, Vittorio de Sica, Andrei Tarkovsky, Luis Buñuel, Ingmar Bergman, Roberto Rosselini, Emir Kusturica, and others. Consistent with the Honors College’s philosophy, we will consider their films interdisciplinarily: both aesthetically, as works of art in and for themselves, but also as “windows” (distorting and enriching at the same time) through which we can have access to the world that these works come from, to their social, political, intellectual and artistic contexts. Such masterpieces testify to the immense richness and complexity of cinema as a medium: an art film always reveals itself as work of art, but it also speaks of wars and revolutions, anxieties and phantasms, major social upheavals, new philosophical ideas and artistic avant-gardes, scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS, MULTICULTURAL, AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3300-H01    Individual Honors Research                         Contact: Donna Srader           (806) 742-1828   

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

FULL

HONS 3301-H02    Bridging the Gap Between the          (CRN #14946)        Prof. K. Ketner        TR 9:30-10:50 AM

                                    Sciences and the Humanities                      SEMINAR

One often encounters the assumption that there is an overwhelming separation between science and the arts/humanities. This course will consider that alleged division, and explore the hypothesis that the divide is an illusion.  We will consider the possibility that these disciplines include unifying common features when viewed through the lens of interdisciplinary study of methods.  Another feature of the class will be the opportunity to open a dialogue between these two grand aspects of human intellectual endeavor.  For this semester, we will focus on the special topic of religion as it might function in this context.  Assignments: Term Paper, Journals (one page per class meeting), xeroxed readings to be provided as class proceeds, one textbook.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3301-H05    Africa’s Role in the                  (CRN #14968)                 Prof. T. Nagy               W 2:00-4:50 PM

                              Contemporary World                                    SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

Africa is the continent least understood by Americans; it is often presented by the media as a land of war, famine, and pestilence.  This course will present Africa's contemporary reality – the positive as well as the negative – by examining major current issues after briefly surveying Africa's history, geography, societies, and culture.  Themes covered will include: political dynamics; regional conflicts; human rights and women's issues; economic development and poverty (including the role played by international assistance); involvement of external forces and globalization; refugees and migration; and environmental and public health crisis (including HIV/AIDS).  The course will also examine Africa's role in current U.S. global policy priorities, including US security concerns.  The required texts are: Understanding Contemporary Africa (edited by April and Donald Gordon); Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe); and supplemental articles designated by the instructor and available in a compendium.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3302-H02    Great Books in Science            (CRN #14998)         Prof. M. Maqusi       MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

SEMINAR

The course is focused on the development of scientific thought and science throughout human history. In order to achieve this objective, selected reading material is solicited from different eras spanning the ancient Greek times (circa 300/350 BCE), and journeying through the enlightenment era (circa 1600-1700+), and then on to modern times (circa 1900-2000).  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM TECHNOLOGY AND APPLIED SCIENCE AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3303-H01    The Science of the Mind        (CRN #15005)          Prof. J. Beck         TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

SEMINAR

Cognitive science seeks to understand the mind by integrating findings from such variegated disciplines as philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, anthropology, evolutionary biology, and artificial intelligence. Among the core principles guiding cognitive science are that mental processes are typically unconscious and computational; that the mind is a biological organ housed  in the brain and shaped by evolution; and that many mental capacities are modularly implemented and innate. We will examine these core principles and apply them to understand a wide range of phenomena, including perception, language, mental imagery, attention, logical reasoning, mathematical reasoning, morality, intelligence, navigation, and consciousness.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

H02 FULL


H03 CANCELLED

HONS 3303-H02    International Affairs              (CRN #15013)           Prof. I. Leslie              TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                               In the Global Community                           SEMINAR

HONS 3303-H03    International Affairs              (CRN #23559)           Prof. I. Leslie          TR 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

                               In the Global Community                           SEMINAR

This course examines the ways in which the international community and its institutions (the United Nations, World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund) impact – and fail to impact - international relations and domestic politics in an increasingly cosmopolitan world. We will ask questions about the role, real and ideal, of the international community in developing nations and economies, in conflict situations around the world, and in black market activities, such as drug trafficking and slavery.  Of course, we cannot understand any of these issues without venturing into economics. Similarly, we will have to pay special attention to the role of cultural differences in international relations.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP BEHAVIOR AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

CANCELLED

HONS 3304-H01      Mozart and the Enlightenment     (CRN# 15019)           Prof. T. Cimarusti       TR 4:00-5:20 PM

SEMINAR

This course will examine the life and music of one of music history’s most fascinating composers, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, focusing on aesthetic, philosophical, and political forces that shape his music, as well as in-depth analyses of select works. Our goal will be to explore various methodologies (e.g., biography, compositional process, reception history) that will illuminate our understanding of this composer – not only as a rather eccentric musical figure, but also as an individual, a professional, and a myth. Topics will include Mozart as a child prodigy, the Enlightenment, Eighteenth-century operatic and symphonic practices, chamber music, and Mozart in film. No music experience is necessary for enrollment.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

FULL

HONS 3304-H02    The Arts as Social and          (CRN #15022)         Prof. A. Duffy            MW 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

                                    Political Statement                                         SEMINAR

The Arts as Social and Political Statement will focus on the impact of the arts on American society from  the early 1900s to present day. A sweeping introduction to specific works that have drawn controversy, asked questions, and opened minds will be included. We will look mostly at performance art, dance, and visual art as catalysts for social and political expression. Specific artists studied will include Pablo Picasso, Karen Finley, Bill T. Jones, Martha Graham, and Robert Mapplethorpe among others. We will ask questions of the artists and of each other in effort to determine art’s position in society, and whether it truly promotes effectual change.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 3304-H03    The American Musical         (CRN #24735)                Prof. D. Chansky            TR 2:00-3:20 PM

                                    As Social Document                                       SEMINAR

The musical is arguably the most American of theatre forms. This class investigates important social issues, problems, causes, and tensions that are present in a genre too often dismissed as “just entertainment.” If you love musicals you should probably already recognize how many deal with race (Show Boat, Finian’s Rainbow, Caroline or Change); politics (Of Thee I  Sing, Let ‘em Eat Cake); prejudice (South Pacific, West Side Story); history (1776, Pacific Overtures, Ragtime; Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson), personal problems requiring therapy  (Lady in the Dark; Next to Normal); Criminals and the legal system (Assassins, Chicago, Parade) and “commitment issues” (Company). The musical is also a genre in which tough, strong women can be the rule as much as the exception (Gypsy, Funny Girl, Call Me Madam, Wicked). In this class we will begin with a recent musical and some critical reading in order to gain an understanding of the intersections between social pressures, story, characters, and music. From there, we will loop back to the early part of the twentieth century and proceed chronologically to return to the present, concluding with the 2010 Broadway production of Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson as a postmodern, hip, rock look at a nexus of social issues that are both historical (the obvious subject of the show) and present-day (all the connections it is meant to summon). THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AND HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS.

 

HONS 4300-H01    Individual Honors Research                         Contact: Donna Srader             (806) 742-1828

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Honors College and approved Honors thesis/project application on file.

Contents will vary to meet the needs of students.  Independent work under the individual guidance of a faculty member, who must be either a member of the graduate faculty or approved by the Honors Dean.

FULL

HONS 4301-H01      Contracts Law (LAW 5404)          (CRN #24624)          Prof. B. Shannon       MTWR 9:00-9:50 AM

SEMINAR

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTU Law School Course LAW 5402. Student evaluation will be based upon a final examination administered at the end of the semester.  Application  to take this course is due on Tuesday, March 22nd.  Enrollment is limited to Honors students only. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis for undergraduate students (form required). First day of class is August 22nd in the Law Building (Room 106).

A study of the enforceability of promises, the creation of contractual obligations, performance and breach, the impact of the contract on the legal relationships of nonparties, and the examination of contract doctrine in three settings: personal services, sales of goods, and construction contracts.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

 

HONS 4301-H02        Early Clinical Experience I       (CRN# 24626)       Prof. Lara Johnson        W 1:00-4:50 PM

Note: This course is cross-listed with TTUHSC School of Medicine course MSCI 5080.  Eligible students must be May/August/Dec 2013 TTU graduates (as shown on the Tech system) with steady progress made toward completion of medical school science requirements. Students must submit to a criminal background check and will need to pass a TB test prior to entry in the class.  APPLICATION DEADLINE: JUNE 3. Enrollment is limited to Honors students only.  This course is assessed on a pass/fail basis for undergraduate students (form required).  Contact Cheryl Carroll for questions.

This block, which begins Sept 1 and ends May 1, provides the framework for PMED students to learn the fundamental concepts of the various roles and responsibilities of physicians. Learning occurs in several settings including classroom instruction, small group forums, as well as in the clinic providing direct patient care and other community-based settings. The students are assigned to Master Clinical Teachers to learn history-taking and physical examination skills. The students also explore ethical, cultural, psychological, and economic dimensions of clinical care through these various learning settings. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF JR/SR LEVEL HONORS CREDIT.

 

HUM 2301-H01      The Western Tradition:         (CRN #15030)          Prof. C. Bradatan       TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

                                    Beginnings to Renaissance

SEMINAR

Note: Non-Honors students requesting to enroll in HUM 2301 must contact Professor Bradatan  for approval before receiving a permit to enroll.

Why is a given literary, philosophical or artistic work considered “novel,” “innovative” or “revolutionary”? How is it that the new appears against a certain intellectual background? To what extent is novelty an “objective” characteristic, intrinsic to the work itself and to what extent is it the result of its interaction with the intellectual/artistic environment within which it emerges? What roles do extraneous factors (such as competition and demands of the market, political pressure/sponsorship, ideological and religious censorship) play in the genesis of novelty? What are the major patterns of intellectual and artistic change in the West? These are some of the questions that we will be addressing in the class. The seminar is an introduction to the Western humanities from Antiquity to Renaissance, with a special emphasis on the issues of novelty, originality, “paradigm shift,” and intellectual change. The course proposes a close look at some of the intense “knots” of novelty, first of all in philosophy and literature, but also in the arts, with the aim of bringing about a better understanding of how cultural history works, what the main “patterns of change” in the Western tradition are, how originality is possible, and how the new is produced.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT.

H01 FULL

H02 FULL

MATH 1351-H01   Calculus I                        (CRN #15043)                 Prof. C. Monico              MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

MATH 1351-H02   Calculus I                        (CRN #15044)                 Prof. L. Roeger            MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

MATH 1351-H03   Calculus I                        (CRN #22344)                 Prof. A. Ibraguimov      TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: Score of 7 on Math Placement Exam; or score of 3 on AP AB Calculus and score of 5 on Math Placement Exam; or 660/29 on the Math section of the SAT/ACT; or MATH 1350 or 1550 with grade B or better; or score of 5 on MPE and MATH 1321 with grade B or better; or MATH 1321 with grade A.

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 1352-H01   Calculus II                      (CRN #15046)                Prof. L. Juan                TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Prerequisite: MATH 1351 with a grade of B- or better.

Methods of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, applications.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

FULL

MATH 2350-H01   Calculus III                     (CRN #15050)                 Prof. E. Allen                  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1352 with a grade of B- or better.

Partial differentiation; functions of several variables; multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes Theorem.  Honors Calculus expands on the regular calculus course by looking in depth into why the concepts work, rather than merely using the concepts.  In addition, various additional applications and topics that should be interesting to students will be covered.  Honors calculus does not require more work than regular calculus, but rather more interesting approaches to the topics.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 2360-H01   Linear Algebra                     (CRN #15055)                 Prof. R. Byerly               TR 9:30-10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 1352 with a grade of B- or better.

This course will involve a balance of theory, application and computation.  The many uses of linear algebra will be emphasized in conjunction with the philosophy that serious applications of linear algebra require some computing capability.  To this end the course will involve significant use of MATLAB.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MATH 3350-H01   Higher Math for Engineers          (CRN #21206)        Prof. L. Allen        TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

                              and Scientists

Note: This course is open to Math minors, but does not fulfill degree requirements for Math majors.

Prerequisite: MATH 2350 with a grade of B- or better.

Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and other selected topics.  This course will be enriched for Honors students with additional readings, projects, and/or expositions.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT.

 

MBIO 3401-H01    Principles of Microbiology    (CRN #28217)     Prof. M. San Francisco     MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

                                                                                                                 & Prof. J. Zak 

MBIO 3401-H51    Lab                                              (CRN #15253)                                                 TR 9:30-11:20 AM

Prerequisite: CHEM 1307, CHEM 1308, BIOL 1403, BIOL 1404

Principles of Microbiology is a survey of the microbial world.  We cover the breadth of microbiology.  From the early developmental stages of the discipline to its enormous growth and role in our understanding of disease, metabolic processes, molecular biology, the ecology of the planet, gene regulation, immunity and food safety.  From bioterrorism to biotechnology and the most important bio-geochemical processes on the plant; from the depths of the oceans to life in extra terrestrial environments.  This will be a text- and literature-driven, discussion-based interactive course!

 

ME 2301- H01         Statics                        (CRN #24854)            Prof. J. Hanson                              TR 2:00-3:20 PM

Prerequisites: Math 1352, Phys 1408

The Mechanical Engineering discipline may be broadly divided into two fundamental topical areas: thermal sciences (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer) and mechanical sciences (statics, solid mechanics, and dynamics).  Statics is the introductory course for the mechanical sciences.  Course topics include the fundamental principles and analysis procedures for particles, rigid bodies, and systems of rigid bodies in static equilibrium and an introduction to solid mechanics or the determination of stresses and deformations in bodies in static equilibrium. Honors Engineering Mechanics I also includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis.  Although this course is designed for engineering majors, it is also appropriate for non-majors with a potential interest in engineering or a general interest in technological topics.  The Honors section of Statics differs from normal sections as it includes an introduction to the numerical methods of structural analysis, and is much smaller in order to allow more opportunities for student-faculty interaction.

 

MGT 4380-H01      Strategic Management            (CRN #15064)           Prof. C. Duran                W 2:00-4:50 PM

Prerequisites: Business students only who have completed BLAW 3391, ISQS 3344, FIN 3320, MKT 3350, MGT 3370, and MGT 3373 with grades of C or higher and are in their final semester.  No COBA classifications permitted.

Strategic Management is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business administration students. This is an exciting, challenging course that focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students use all the knowledge and concepts acquired from prior business courses, integrate them with new strategic-management techniques, and use them to chart the future direction of different organizations. The major responsibility of students in this course is to make objective strategic decisions and to justify them through oral presentations and written case studies. This course is taught using active learning and experiential techniques and is primarily discussion-based, but also has written components. Critical thinking skills are required for the experiential exercises and case analyses and will be enhanced during this course. This honors course periodically contains a service learning experience and case. Service learning is an active learning technique that combines application of course concepts, interaction with a community partner, and reflective components. The students will have the chance to apply the strategic management concepts learned in this course in a real world setting.

 

MKT 3350-H01          Introduction to Marketing          (CRN #24601)          Prof. J. Wilcox         TR 12:30-1:50PM

Prerequisite: Eco 2301 or AAEC 2305 or Eco 2305

Students must have a declared business major or minor or BAUD classification

The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the discipline of marketing, both as a philosophy of business and as a series of business practices. The course will explore the field of marketing, as it directs the organization’s resources to satisfy customers’ wants and needs through the exchange process, at a reasonable profit to the organization. Specifically, we will examine how marketers: understand consumers’ needs and wants; develop products and services that provide superior value; and how they price, distribute, and promote products and services effectively, both domestically and internationally. The course will direct your study of the organization (either a profit-oriented firm or a non-profit organization) as a market entity existing in a competitive environment. The emphasis will be on understanding the importance of quality, value, and customer relationship management in obtaining a competitive advantage in today’s marketplace. In addition, we will consider the ethical and societal issues related to marketing. The course will emphasize service learning where you will work with a real client organization to solve marketing problems through research and analysis.

 

MUHL 2302-703      Music as Cultural History II:         (CRN #26308)           Prof. S. Houck        F 11:00-11:50 AM

                                The Early Period (Honors Lab)

Note: Students wishing to take the 703 lab section, should see Linda Gregston, advisor for the School of Music.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1200 and MUHL 2301

Corequisite: MUHL 2302 -001

When does our current history of music begin?  Who were some of the first composers and performers, and what did they do that still informs modern music?  The answers to these questions and many more can be found in Music-MUHL 2302, which is the second semester of a three-semester sequence on the history and evolution of style in music in the European tradition.  Designed to build on your experience in MUSI 1200 and to coordinate with studies in the Music Theory sequence, this course draws on both “classical” and “folk” musical traditions.  The course seeks to develop a set of tools that lets us hear, read, speak, and write accurately and insightfully about many different musical repertories from the early period (c. prehistory to 1700).  Emphasis will be placed on the historical context of music making, recognizing that music is a product of, but also helps to produce the concepts of culture that surround it.  This is a writing intensive course that will include a substantial research project in addition to regular listening and reading assignments.

 

PHYS 1408-H01     Principles of Physics I            (CRN# 15076)               Prof. W. Glab             TR 12:30-1:50 PM

PHYS 1408-H51     Principles of Physics I Lab      (CRN# 18087)                 Staff                              M 2:00-3:50 PM

PHYS 1408-719      Discussion                               (CRN #28218)                   Staff                              F 2:00-2:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisite:  MATH 1351

Corequisite:  PHYS 1408-H51 Lab, PHYS 1408-719

Calculus-based introductory physics course. Mechanics, kinematics, energy, momentum, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

PHYS 2401-H01     Principles of Physics II                (CRN# 22775)         Prof. R. Lichti              TR 9:30-10:50 AM

PHYS 2401-H51     Principles of Physics II Lab          (CRN# 22776)                 Staff                       W 2:00-4:50 PM

Note: This course is open to Honors students and non-Honors Physics and Engineering majors.

Prerequisites: PHYS 1408 and MATH 1352

Corequisite: PHYS 2401-H51

Calculus-based introductory physics. Electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and optics. The Honors section differs from the regular sections in its small class size and increased opportunities for discussion. This section is specifically taught for Physics majors as well as Honors students. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 4 HOURS OF THE CORE CURRICULUM NATURAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

 

PSY 3301-H01        Psychology of the Arts              (CRN# 20332)        Prof. S. Harter       TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

SEMINAR

In this course we will examine applications of psychological theories and methodologies to the arts, including artistic creativity, production, and appreciation.  The format encourages dialogue about issues in the psychology of the arts.  Class discussions, presentations, a final paper, and other class exercises encourage students to actively make meaning and apply course content to their own interests and experience, critically considering issues presented in class readings and discussions and elaborating beyond readings to generate creative applications of material.  Issues considered include similarities and differences between science and art, the potential contributions that psychology can make to understanding artistic processes, and the potential contributions that the arts can make to psychology.  We examine psychological theories and methods used in the study of creativity and the arts from specialties within psychology including developmental, perceptual, cognitive, social, biological, and clinical.  THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

FULL

PSY 3304-H01        Introduction to Social Psychology    (CRN #20418)      Prof. K. DeMaree      TR 2:00-3:20 PM

SEMINAR

Prerequisite: PSY 1300

Why is it that the driver who cuts you off is a jerk, but when you cut someone off, it is only because you nearly missed your exit? Who do people find attractive? Why do some people justify a slice of cheesecake after ordering a healthy salad for lunch? Why are people prejudiced? How can we reduce aggression, increase helping, or increase recycling? These are some of the questions that social psychologists address. In this course, students will learn that an understanding of the ways that other people affect our thoughts, feelings, and behavior can lend insights into predicting, explaining, and changing our own as well as others’ behavior. This course offers an intensive introduction to social psychology, going beyond the textbook to include active discussion of original research articles, paper assignments that ask you to apply course content to the real world, and class presentations. THIS COURSE FULFILLS 3 HOURS OF THE HONORS SEMINAR REQUIREMENT.

Fall 2011 Seminars

ARCH 4311-H01            Architecture in Non-Wester Societies   (Multicultural Credit)       R 6:00-8:50 PM CANCELLED

EVHM 2302-H01            The Literature of Place     (formerly EVHM 2302)         T 2:00-4:50 PM

EVHM 3300-H01            Writing for Publication  (formerly EVHM 3300)   TR 12:30-1:50 PM

EVHM 3305-H01             Ecology    (formerly EVHM 3305)   MWF 2:00-2:50 PM FULL

HIST 3361-H01               British History   TR 9:30-10:50 AM  FULL

HONS 1302-H02             Honors Seminar in Healthcare (Technology & Applied Science Credit)  T 6:00-8:50 PM FULL

HONS 2311-H01             The Middle East in a Globalizing World (Humanities & Multicultural Credit)  MWF 9:00-9:50 AM FULL

HONS 2311-H02             Social Justice, Constitutionalism, and Public Rhetoric       TR 8:00-9:20 AM CANCELLED

HONS 2314-H01             Europe And Its Cinema (Visual & Performing Arts and Multicultural Credit)  T 6:00-8:50 PM  FULL

HONS 3301-H02             Bridging the Gap Between the Sciences and Humanities (Humanities Credit)  TR 9:30-10:50 AM  FULL

HONS 3301-H05             Africa’s Role in the Contemporary World (Humanities Credit)  W 2:00-4:50 PM  FULL

HONS 3302-H02             Great Books In Science (Technology & Applied Science Credit)  MWF 10:00-10:50 AM

HONS 3303-H01             The Science of the Mind (Individual or Group Behavior Credit)  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM    FULL

HONS 3303-H02             International Affairs in the Global Community (Individual or Group Behavior Credit)  TR 2:00-3:20 PM FULL

HONS 3303-H03             International Affairs in the Global Community (Individual or Group Behavior Credit)  TR 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM CANCELLED

HONS 3304-H01             Mozart and the Enlightenment (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)            TR 4:00-5:20 PM   CANCELLED

HONS 3304-H02             The Arts as Social and Political Statement (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  MW 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

HONS 3304-H03             The American Musical as Social Document (Visual & Performing Arts Credit)  TR 2:00-3:20 PM  FULL

HONS 4301-H01             Contracts Law  TBA    FULL

HUM 2301-H01                The Western Tradition (Humanities Credit)   TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

PSY 3301-H01                Psychology of the Arts  TR 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

PSY 3304-H01                Introduction to Social Psychology  TR 2:00-3:20 PM FULL